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I2S Sound Tutorial for ESP32

hello,
I want to us an i2s mic so when i talk i can hear my self from the other side i wrote this Programm below using the buffer and the left and right side of the esp32 but it seems not to be working can you help me

tim

#include “esp_system.h”

#include “esp_log.h”

#include “driver/i2s.h”

#include “freertos/ringbuf.h”

#include

#include

// micro port
#define I2S_PORT I2S_NUM_1

// haut parleur Port
#define I2S_PORT_0 I2S_NUM_0

//haut parleur
#define I2S_WS_PIN_OUT 22

#define I2S_SCK_PIN_OUT 26

#define I2S_DATA_PIN_OUT 25

// micro
#define I2S_IN_NUM (1)

#define I2S_IN_BCK_IO (GPIO_NUM_14)

#define I2S_IN_WS_IO (GPIO_NUM_33)

#define I2S_IN_DO_IO (-1)

#define I2S_IN_DI_IO (GPIO_NUM_32)

#include

char* i2s_read_buff;
char* ptr_write_buff;
char* i2s_write_buff;

//SPH0645 Microfon // 32-Bit Modus, 24 Bit Daten, 2er-Komplement, MSB first, Rest wird mit 0 rausgetaktet

// SEL wird für linker/rechter Kanal benötigt

// SEL hier: GND

static const char *TAG = “I2s”;

//buf_len = 1024; // 8 Bytes pro gelesenes Sample => 128 Samples => 3ms Buffer

//buf_len = 4096; // 8 Bytes pro gelesenes Sample => 512 Samples => 12ms Buffer

//buf_len = 8192; // 8 Bytes pro gelesenes Sample => 1024 Samples => 24ms Buffer

#define buf_len (8192)

void setup()
{
i2s_setpin();
i2s_start(I2S_PORT);
i2s_start(I2S_PORT_0);

}
void loop()

{

}

void task_megaphone(void *pvParams)
{

char *buf = (char *)calloc(buf_len, sizeof(char));
struct timeval tv = {0};
struct timezone *tz = {0};
gettimeofday(&tv, &tz);
uint64_t micros = tv.tv_usec + tv.tv_sec * 1000000;
uint64_t micros_prev = micros;
uint64_t delta = 0;
uint32_t delta2=0;

int16_t value_16bit=0;
char*p_value_16bit= (char*)&value_16bit;
int cnt = 0;
uint16_t i=0;
int bytes_to_write = 0;
size_t bytes_written=0;
while(1)
{
char*buf_ptr_read = buf;
char*buf_ptr_write = buf;
// read whole block of samples
size_t bytes_read = 0;
while(bytes_read == 0) i2s_read(I2S_PORT, buf, buf_len, &bytes_read,10);
// Mikrophone liefert 32 Bit pro Kanal (L/R) – also 4 Bytes pro Kanal;
// Mikrophone liefert also 8 Bytes links und rechtes zusammen
uint32_t samples_read = bytes_read / 8; // 2 / (I2S_BITS_PER_SAMPLE_32BIT / 8);
// Mikrofon gibt nur Mono aus
// convert 2x 32 bit stereo -> 1 x 16 bit mono
float max=0;
for(i = 0; i max) max=abs(value_16bit);
buf_ptr_write += 4; //2 * (I2S_BITS_PER_SAMPLE_16BIT / 8);
buf_ptr_read += 8; //2 * (I2S_BITS_PER_SAMPLE_32BIT / 8);

}
cnt += samples_read;
if(cnt >= 44100) {

gettimeofday(&tv, &tz);
micros = tv.tv_usec + tv.tv_sec * 1000000;
delta = micros – micros_prev;
micros_prev = micros;
delta2=delta;
cnt = 0;
}

buf_ptr_write = buf;

for(i = 0; i < samples_read; i++) {

buf_ptr_write[0] = *p_value_16bit++; // low
buf_ptr_write[1] = *p_value_16bit; // high

// right

buf_ptr_write[2] = buf_ptr_write[0]; // low
buf_ptr_write[3] = buf_ptr_write[1]; // high

// Ausgabe (write) hat 4 Bytes pro Sample (2×2 Bytes = 2×16 Bit)

buf_ptr_write += 4; //2 * (I2S_BITS_PER_SAMPLE_16BIT / 8);

}

// local echo

//rechne Anzahl zu schreibende Byes aus:

bytes_to_write = samples_read * 4; //2 * (I2S_BITS_PER_SAMPLE_16BIT / 8);
i2s_write(I2S_PORT_0, buf, bytes_to_write, &bytes_written,portMAX_DELAY);

}
}

void i2s_install()
{
const i2s_config_t i2s_config_in =
{
.mode = i2s_mode_t(I2S_MODE_MASTER | I2S_MODE_RX),
.sample_rate = 44100,
.bits_per_sample = i2s_bits_per_sample_t(32),
.channel_format = I2S_CHANNEL_FMT_RIGHT_LEFT,
.communication_format = i2s_comm_format_t(I2S_COMM_FORMAT_I2S | I2S_COMM_FORMAT_I2S_MSB),
.intr_alloc_flags = ESP_INTR_FLAG_LEVEL1, // default interrupt priority
.dma_buf_count = 14,
.dma_buf_len = 64,
};

const i2s_config_t i2s_config_out =
{
.mode = i2s_mode_t(I2S_MODE_MASTER | I2S_MODE_TX),
.sample_rate = 44100,
.bits_per_sample = i2s_bits_per_sample_t(16),
.channel_format = I2S_CHANNEL_FMT_RIGHT_LEFT,
.communication_format = i2s_comm_format_t(I2S_COMM_FORMAT_I2S | I2S_COMM_FORMAT_I2S_MSB),
.intr_alloc_flags = 0, // default interrupt priority
.dma_buf_count = 32,
.dma_buf_len = 64,
.use_apll = 0,
.tx_desc_auto_clear= true
};

i2s_driver_install(I2S_PORT, &i2s_config_in, 0, NULL);
i2s_driver_install(I2S_PORT_0, &i2s_config_out, 0, NULL);
}

void i2s_setpin()
{
const i2s_pin_config_t pin_config_in =
{
.bck_io_num = I2S_IN_BCK_IO,
.ws_io_num = I2S_IN_WS_IO,
.data_out_num = I2S_IN_DO_IO,
.data_in_num = I2S_IN_DI_IO ,
};
const i2s_pin_config_t pin_config_out =
{
.bck_io_num =I2S_SCK_PIN_OUT ,
.ws_io_num = I2S_WS_PIN_OUT,
.data_out_num = I2S_PIN_NO_CHANGE,
.data_in_num = I2S_DATA_PIN_OUT,
};
i2s_set_pin(I2S_PORT, &pin_config_in);
i2s_set_pin(I2S_PORT_0, &pin_config_out);
}

void app_main(void) {

i2s_install();

i2s_setpin();
i2s_start(I2S_PORT);
i2s_start(I2S_PORT_0);

xTaskCreate(&task_megaphone, "task_megaphone", 16384, NULL, 20, NULL);

while (1)

{

vTaskDelay(1000 / portTICK_PERIOD_MS);

}

}

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Sours: https://diyi0t.com/i2s-sound-tutorial-for-esp32/

This library allows you to use the I2S protocol on SAMD21 based boards (i.e Arduino or Genuino Zero, MKRZero or MKR1000 Board).

To use this library


I2S (Inter-IC Sound), is an electrical serial bus interface standard used for connecting digital audio devices together. It is used to communicate PCM audio data between integrated circuits in an electronic device.

An I2S bus that follows the Philips standard is made up of at least three wires:

  • SCK (Serial Clock): is the clock signal also referred as BCLK (Bit Clock Line);
  • FS (Frame Select): used to discriminate Right or Left Channel data also referred WS (Word Select);
  • SD (Serial Data): the serial data to be transmitted;

As detailed below, the device who generates SCK and WS is the Master.

The SCK line has a frequency that depends on the sample rate, the number of bits for channel and the number of channels in the following way:

Frequency = SampleRate x BitsPerChannel x numberOfChannels

In a typical setup, the sender of audio data is called a Transmitter and it transfers data to a Receiver at the other end. The device that controls the bus clock, SCK, together with the Word Select - WS - signal is the Master in the network and in any network just one device can be Master at any given time; all the other devices connected are in Slave mode. The Master can be the Transmitter, or the Receiver, or a standalone controller. The digitized audio data sample can have a size ranging from 4 bits up to 32.

As a general rule of thumb, the higher the sample rate (kHz) and bits per sample, the better audio quality (when the digital data is converted back to analog audio sound).

For more information about the I2S protocol see the I2S specifications.

Examples

  • SimpleTone : Generate a simple tone over I2S
  • InputSerialPlotter : Show over the serial plotter the input waveform captured by an I2S microphone


Last revision 2019/12/24 by SM

Sours: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/I2S
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I2S Theremin © GPL3+

Arduino I2S library

The new Arduino I2S library allows you to send and receive digital audio data on the I2S bus. This example aims to show how to use this library to drive an I2S DAC to reproduce sound computed within the Arduino sketch.

For more information about the library and how it works read the library page.

I2S Connections

The I2S DAC used in this example needs only 3 wires for the I2S bus (plus power supply). Connections for the I2S on the Arduino MKRZero are the following:

  • SD (Serial Data) on pin A6;
  • SCK (Serial Clock) on pin 2;
  • FS (Frame or Word Select) on pin 3;

How it works

A theremin has basically two controls:

In this example these two parameters are changed moving two slide potentiometers, but you can modify it to read them using for example a ping sensor! In this way your theremin will be more realistic!

The two potentiometers are wired in a voltage divider fashion, so moving them you will get (from ) values in the range 0 - 1023. These values are then mapped to between the minimum and maximum frequency and the minimum and maximum volume.

The sound sent on the I2S bus is a simple sine whose frequency and amplitude is changed according to the potentiometers reading.

Sours: https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/Arduino_Genuino/i2s-theremin-cec47a

CD player, as an indispensable audio product in the 20th century, has a transport and a DAC in one box. But, do you ever wonder how is the information for transport connected to the DAC inside of a CD player? The Inter-IC Sound(I2S) Bus is the key!

In this blog, I will cover the following topics:

  • Introduction to Inter-IC Sound(I2S)
  • Inter-IC Sound(I2S) v.s. Inter-Integrated Circuit(I2C)
  • What is I2S?
  • I2S Operation Modes
  • I2S with Arduino and Raspberry Pi

Introduction to Inter-IC Sound(I2S)

Similar to the CD player, lots of digital audio systems need the (V)LSI ICs for processing:

  • DAC and ADC
  • Digital signal processors
  • Error correction for CD and digital recording
  • Digital filters
  • Digital input / output interface

Standardized communication structures are critical for manufacturers in order to increase the flexibility of the system. I2S is designed for this purpose.

Inter-IC Sound(I2S) or Integrated Interchip Sound is a digital audio serial bus interface transmission standard defined by Philips in February 1986 (revised June 1996). It aims to transmit digital audio data between the internal devices of the system, such as CODEC, DSP, digital input/output interface, DAC, ADC and digital filter.

Be careful not to confuse I2S with the other Phillips Semiconductor protocol, Inter-Integrated Circuit(I2C), which was released in 1982.

Inter-IC Sound(I2S) v.s. Inter-Integrated Circuit(I2C)

Inter-IC Sound(I2S)

  • Used to connect digital audio devices. It is an electrical bus interface standard as well.
  • Low jitter connection since the data and clock signal transmit separately.
  • Support full-duplex / half-duplex
  • Support master/slave mode
  • Support multiple channels, since the variant of I2S supports multi-channel time-division multiplexing
  • Delivers fully digital audio signal chain. It eliminates ADC/DACs and pre-amplifier usually found in the traditional audio chain
  • No issue with synchronization with the use of master clock

Inter-Integrated Circuit(I2C)

  • I2C includes electrical and timing specifications, and an associated bus protocol.
  • Low-speed and two-wire serial data connection bus.
  • Bi-directional data transfer.
  • Used for signals transmission between ICs on the same PCB.
  • Two lines only between multiple masters and multiple slaves, Serial Dara(SDA) and Serial Clock(SCL).
  • Synchronous communication, it has a global clock signal between masters and slaves.
  • Support different data rates, e.g. 100Kbps, 400Kbps, 1Mbps, and 3.4Mbps.
  • Unique start and stop condition. Start and stop bits as well as ACK bit is used for every 8 bits of data transfer.
  • No fixed length to transfer

In Summary, the I2C bus is used to connect the microcontroller and its peripheral devices while the I2S bus focuses on the audio data transmission between digital audio devices.

But, what is I2S and what does it actually do?

What is I2S?

The bus has only to handle the audio signal, while the other signals, such as sub-coding and control, are transferred separately. To minimize the number of pins, there are three lines defined in the I2S bus:

  • word select line (WS)
  • continuous serial clock line (SCK)
  • serial data line (SD)

The device generating SCK and WS is the master. However, it is hard to define the master for the system with several transmitters and receivers. In this case, a system master is defined as controlling the flow of digital audio data between various ICs. Hence, transmitters need to generate data under the control of an external clock and act as a slave.

word select line

A word select line is the channel selection signal, indicating the channel selected by the transmitter.

  • WS = 0, channel 1 (left)
  • WS = 1, channel 2 (right)

WS may change either on a trailing or leading edge of the serial clock, but it doesn’t need to be symmetrical.

In the slave, the signal is latched on the leading edge of the clock signal. The WS line changes one clock period before the MSB is transmitted allows the slave transmitter to derive synchronous timing of the serial data that will be set up for transmission. Furthermore, it enables the receiver to store the previous word and clear the input for the next word.

Clock line

Officially “continuous serial clock (SCK)”, typically written “bit clock (BCLK)”, is the synchronization signal in the module which is provided externally in slave mode and internally generated in master mode.

SCK = Sampling frequency (e.g. 48kHz, 44.1kHz, etc) * word length (16bit, 24bit, 32bit) * 2 (left and right channels)

Take propagation delays between the master clock and the data and/or word select signals into account, the total delay is the sum of:

  • the delay between the external(master) clock and the slave’s internal clock; and
  • the delay between the internal clock and the data and/or WS signals.

Data line

The serial data is transmitted in two’s complement with the MSB first. The MSB is transmitted because of different word lengths between transmitter and receiver.

  • If the system word length is greater than the transmitter word length, the word is truncated (LSBs are set to ‘0’) for data transmission.
  • If the receiver is sent more bits than its word length, the bits after the LSB are ignored.
  • If the receiver is sent fewer bits than its word length, the missing bits are set to zero internally.

The MSB has a fixed position, whereas the position of the LSB depends on the word length. The sender always sends the MSB of the next word one clock period after the WS changes.

Serial data sent by the transmitter may be synchronized with either falling or rising edge of the clock signal. However, the serial data must be latched into the receiver on the rising edge of the clock signal.

I2S Operation Modes

Based on the position of SD relative to SCK and WS, I2S is divided into three different operation modes: Phillips Standard, Left Justified Standard, Right Justified Standard.

Phillips Standard

Phillips Standard is a special case of left-justified, which is delayed by a change of one clock bit from the standard left justified standard. The data MSB of both left and right channels are valid after the second SCK / BCLK rising edge after WS changes.

Left Justified Standard

Left Justified Standard is not widely used, it is not delayed by one clock relative to BCLK. The MSB of both channels is valid after the first rising edge of SCK / BCLK after WS changes.

Right Justified Standard

Right Justified Standard, also called Japanese format, Electronic Industries Association of Japan(EIAJ) or SONY format. The LSB of the left channel is valid at the rising edge of SCK / BCLK before the falling edge of WS, while the LSB of the right channel is valid at the rising edge of SCK / BCLK before the rising edge of WS.

Compared to Left Justified Standard, the disadvantage of Right Justified Standard is that the receiving device must know the word length of the data to be transmitted in advance.

Please be careful, for Right Justified Standard and Left Justified Standard:

  • WS = 1, channel 1 (left)
  • WS = 0, channel 2 (right)

It is opposite to the Phillips Standard!

I2S with Arduino and Raspberry Pi

with Arduino

There is a library called ‘I2S library’ that allows you to use the I2S protocol on SAMD21 based boards. For the detailed information about the I2S library, please refer to ‘I2S library‘.

With the use of I2S bus, a low jitter audio data transmission between digital devices is achieved. Now, it’s time to build your real-time MIDI music player with this I2S protocol! In Seeed, a music shield is designed for this purpose which is compatible with  Arduino, Seeeduino, Seeeduino Mega, and Arduino Mega.

with Raspberry Pi

You are a fan of Raspberry Pi? Don’t worry, there is a perfect suite for you. ReSpeaker 4-Mic Array for Raspberry Pi is a 4 microphone expansion board for Raspberry Pi designed for AI and voice applications. This means that you can build a more powerful and flexible voice product that integrates Amazon Alexa Voice Service, Google Assistant, and so on.

There are other versions also available in the market:

Please follow and like us:

Tags: Arduino, audio protocol, I2S, Inter-IC Sound Bus(I2S), Raspberry Pi

Sours: https://www.seeedstudio.com/blog/2020/05/11/basic-electronics-high-quality-audio-with-inter-ic-soundi2s-bus/

Arduino i2s

The Inter-IC Sound (I2S) Protocol

The Inter-IC Sound protocol, or I2S, is a protocol for tramsmitting digital audio from one device to another. It transfers pulse-code modulated (PCM) audio data, the standard for digital audio, from one integrated circuit (IC) to another. The standard was developed by Philips in the 1980’s and 90’s.

I2S can be used to send pre-recorded audio files from a microcontroller to an amplifier or Digital-to-Analog converter (DAC). It can also be used to digitize audio from a microphone. There is no compression protocol in I2S itself, so you can’t play MP3 or OGG files or other audio formats that compress the audio, but you can play WAV files.

The MKR Zero, the Nano 33 IoT, and the other Arduino modules in the MKR family can communicate using I2S. In the examples that follow, you’ll see how to use an I2S amplifier to play WAV files from an SD card, and how to analyze audio coming from an I2S microphone.

Note that on the Nano 33 IoT, you will need to activate the I2S bus by adding the following line after the library includes:

You’ll see that in the Wave Playback examples below.

Examples

There are additional examples available on the ArduinoSound Library page.

If you plan to play .wav files using the ArduinoSound library using the examples here, The .wav file must be formatted as follows:stereo, signed 16-bit, 44100Hz. There’s a good tutorial on the Arduino site on how to do this using the free audio editing software Audacity.

Your SD card needs to be formatted as FAT32 or FAT16. There are some instructions on the Arduino site on formatting your card, as well as the Adafruit site. If you’re formatting on MacOS, you can use the DiskUtility app, but you must format your disk as MS-DOS (FAT).

I2S Electrical Connections

I2S is a synchronous serial bus protocol, meaning that you can connect multiple devices on the same common wires. The connections for an I2S bus are:

  • Serial clock (SCK) or Bit Clock (BCLK): the line that carries the clock signal
  • Frame Select (FS), also called Word Select (WS), or Left-Right Clock (LRC): determines left and right channels
  • Data, also called Digital Out (DOUT) or Digital In (DIN) depending on the application: the data signal itself.

The controlling device sends the clock signal, just like in other synchronous serial protocols like I2C and SPI. For more on the technical details, see the I2S specification, as explained on Cypress’ site.

The Arduino I2S and the ArduinoSound libraries support I2S.

The typical connections are as follows:

  • BCLK connects to pin D2 of the MKR board or A3 of the Nano 33 IoT board
  • LRC connects to pin D3 of the MKR board or A2 of the Nano 33 IoT board
  • DIN/DOUT connects to pin A6 of the MKR board or D4 of the Nano 33 IoT board

This wiring is shown in Figure 1 with a MSX98357 I2S audio amplifier. You can attach a speaker to this amp and play audio that you read from a MKR Zero’s SD card, generated by the microcontroller’s I2S output. Figure 2 shows the corresponding wiring for a Nano 33 IoT, which also needs an external SD card if you plan to play .WAV files.

Figure 1. MAX98357 I2S audio amplifier connected to a MKR Zero.

Figure 1. MAX98357 I2S audio amplifier connected to a MKR Zero. The amp is mounted on the breadboard below the MKR Zero, with the pins on the left side. There are also two holes marked + and - on the right side of the board for a speaker. The pin connections are shown in Table 1.

Table 1. MKR Zero to MAX98357 I2S Audio Amp Connections

Amp Pin No.Amp Pin functionMKR Zero Pin No.MKR Zero Pin Function
1LRC10D2
2BCLK11D3
3DIN8A6
4GAIN--
5SD--
6GNDGround busGround
7VinVoltage busVoltage

Figure 2. MAX98357 I2S audio amplifier connected to a Nano 33 IoT.

Figure 1. MAX98357 I2S audio amplifier connected to a Nano 33 IoT. The amp is mounted on the breadboard below the Nano 33 IoT, with the pins on the left side. A Sparkfun Level Shifting MicroSD card breakout board is mounted below the amp with the pins on the right side. The pin connections are shown in Tables 2 and 3. Note that the physical pin numbers for other MicroSD breakout boards might be different.

Table 2. Nano 33 IoT to MAX98357 I2S Audio Amp Connections

Amp Pin No.Amp Pin functionNano 33 IoT Pin No.Nano 33 IoT Pin Function
1LRC7A3
2BCLK6A2
3DIN22D4
4GAIN--
5SD--
6GNDGround busGround
7VinVoltage busVoltage

Table 3. Nano 33 IoT to Sparkfun Level Shifting MicroSD Card Connections

MicroSD Pin No.MicroSD Pin functionNano 33 IoT Pin No.Nano 33 IoT Pin Function
1VCCVoltage busVoltage
2CS28D10/CS
3DI29D11/MOSI
4SCK1D13/SCK
5DO30D12/MISO
6CD--
7GNDGround busGround

Figure 3 shows a MKR Zero with a UDA1334 Digital-to-Analog (DAC) module, and Figures 4 through 6 with various I2S microphones. You’ll see this wiring repeated the examples that follow.

The MAX98357 takes an I2S signal as input and outputs analog audio. The UDA1334 DAC module, shown in Figure 3, has no amp, but has a stereo mini jack that you can use to connect it to headphones or an amp.

Figure 3. UDA1334 I2S DAC connected to a MKR Zero.

Figure 3. UDA1334 I2S DAC connected to a MKR Zero. The DAC is mounted below the MKR Zero on the breadboard, with the audio jack pointed to the bottom of the breadboard, away from the MKR Zero. The DAC’s pins, numbered in a U from top left, are: Vin; 3V out; GND; WSEL; DIN; BCLK; LOUT; AGND; ROUT; then on the right, from bottom right: DEEM; PLL; SF0; MUTE; SF1; SCLK. Table 4 details the pin connections between the DAC and the MKR Zero.

Table 4. MKR Zero to UDA1334 I2S DAC Connections

DAC Pin No.DAC Pin functionMKR Zero Pin No.MKR Zero Pin Function
1VinVoltage BusVoltage
23V out--
3GNDGround BusGround
4WSEL11D3
5DIN8A6
6BCLK10D2

The remainder of the DAC’s pins are unconnected.

An I2C microphone generates an I2C signal from acoustic input. There are a few different I2S microphones on the market and they all appear to have slightly different sensitivities, though they all operate with the same code. Figure 4 shows the INMP441 mic, available from various retailers on Amazon. Figure 5 shows the Invensense ICS43434, available from Tindie. Figure 6 shows the SPH0645, available from Adafruit.

Figure 4. INMP441 I2S Mic connected to a MKR Zero.

Figure 4. INMP441 I2S Mic connected to a MKR Zero. The Mic is mounted on the breadboard below the MKR Zero. The Mic’s pins, numbered in a U pattern from top left, are: L/R select; WS; SCK; SD; 3V; GND. Table 5 details the pin connections.

Table 5. MKR Zero to INMP441 I2S Mic Connections

Mic Pin No.Mic Pin functionMKR Zero Pin No.MKR Zero Pin Function
1L/R SEL--
2WS11D3
3SCK10D2
4SD8A6
53VVoltage BusVoltage
6GNDGround BusGround

Figure 5. ICS43434 I2S Mic connected to a MKR Zero.

Figure 5. ICS43434 I2S Mic connected to a MKR Zero. The Mic is mounted on the breadboard below the MKR Zero. The Mic’s pins, numbered in a U pattern from top left, are: 3V; SCK; GND; L/R select; WS; SD. Table 6 details the pin connections.

Pin 1 (3V) is connected to the 3.3V bus. Pin 2 of the mic (SCK) is connected to digital pin 2 on the MKR Zero (physical pin 11). Pin 3 of the mic (GND) is connected to the ground bus. Pin 5 of the mic (WS) is connected to pin 3 of the MKR Zero (physical pin 12). Pin 6 of the mic (SD) is connected to pin A6 of the Arduino (physical pin 8).*

Table 6. MKR Zero to ICS43434 I2S Mic Connections

Mic Pin No.Mic Pin functionMKR Zero Pin No.MKR Zero Pin Function
13VVoltage BusVoltage
2SCK10D2
3GNDGround BusGround
4L/R SEL--
5WS11D3
6SD8A6

Figure 6. SPH0645 I2S Mic connected to a MKR Zero.

Figure 6. SPH0645 I2S Mic connected to a MKR Zero. The Mic is mounted on the breadboard below the MKR Zero with the pins facing to the left. The Mic’s pins, numbered from top to bottom, are: SEL; LRCL; DOUT; BCLK; GND; 3V. Table 7 details the connections.

Pin 2 of the mic (LRCL) is connected to pin 3 of the MKR Zero (physical pin 12). Pin 3 of the mic (DOUT) is connected to pin A6 of the Arduino (physical pin 8). Pin 4 of the mic (BCLK) is connected to digital pin 2 on the MKR Zero (physical pin 11). Pin 5 of the mic (GND) is connected to the ground bus. Pin 6 (3V) is connected to the 3.3V bus.*

Table 7. MKR Zero to SPH0645 I2S Mic Connections

Mic Pin No.Mic Pin functionMKR Zero Pin No.MKR Zero Pin Function
1L/R SEL--
2WS11D3
3SD8A6
4SCK10D2
5GNDGround BusGround
63VVoltage BusVoltage
Sours: https://tigoe.github.io/SoundExamples/i2s.html
My 1602 display for Arduino with I2S covertor

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