Dispatches from elsewhere wiki

Dispatches from elsewhere wiki DEFAULT

Dispatches from Elsewhere

First released

March 1,

Executive producer

Jason Segel
Scott Rudin
Eli Bush
Garrett Basch

Dispatches from Elsewhere is an AMC anthology drama television series premiering on Sunday, March 1, The series was created by Jason Segel who also directed the pilot, serves as executive producer, and has a starring role.

The series is based on documentary film The Institute.

Synopsis[]

Official synopsis for Dispatches from Elsewhere from AMC's website:

Dispatches from Elsewhere follows a group of ordinary people who stumble onto a puzzle hiding just behind the veil of everyday life. They will come to find that the mystery winds far deeper than they ever imagined.

Cast and characters[]

Starring:

Recurring:

Episodes[]

#TitleFirst aired
1PeterMarch 1,
2SimoneMarch 2,
3JaniceMarch 9,
4FredwynnMarch 16,
5ClaraMarch 23,
6EveryoneMarch 30,
7Cave of KelpiesApril 6,
8LeeApril 13,
9The CreatorApril 20,
10The BoyApril 27,

Gallery[]

Promotional images[]

Promotional stills[]

First look images released for the series:

Trailers[]

Dispatches From Elsewhere Official Trailer Premieres March 1

Dispatches From Elsewhere Official Trailer Premieres March 1

External links[]

References[]

Sours: https://dispatches-from-elsewhere.fandom.com/wiki/Dispatches_from_Elsewhere

Welcome to Dispatches from Elsewhere Wiki

DFE.jpg
Dispatches from Elsewherefollows a group of ordinary people who stumble onto a puzzle hiding just behind the veil of everyday life. They will come to find that the mystery winds far deeper than they ever imagined.

The series premieres on AMC this Sunday, March 1, The second episode will air the following evening on Monday, March 2, , with subsequent episodes continuing to air weekly on Monday nights.

Characters

Episodes

Peter (episode)

Peter
airs Sunday, March 1,

Simone (episode)

Simone
airs Monday, March 2,

Janice (episode)

Janice
airs Monday, March 9,

Fredwynn &#; Clara &#; Everyone &#; Cave of Kelpies &#; Lee &#; The Creator &#; The Boy

Trailer

Dispatches_From_Elsewhere_Official_Trailer_Premieres_March_1

News feed

Sours: https://dispatches-from-elsewhere.fandom.com/wiki/Dispatches_from_Elsewhere_Wiki
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&#;Dispatches From Elsewhere&#; Finale: Jason Segel On Injecting Himself Into His Series&#; World And What He Knows About A Possible Season 2

SPOILER ALERT: This story includes details from tonight&#;s finale of AMC&#;s Dispatches from Elsewhere.

In Monday&#;s season finale of Dispatches from Elsewhere, we finally learn the backstory of one mysterious, recurring character, with the unexpected entry of another into the narrative.

Titled “The Boy,” episode 10 of the freshman AMC drama opens on a boy in a black-and-white world, watching such classics as The Muppet Show and Harold and Maude on his small retro TV. Inspired by what he’s seen, the boy becomes an actor, ending up in the clown makeup we’ve seen him wear since episode 3.

Auditioning for a room of executives with a rendition of “Make ‘Em Laugh”—the iconic song from Singin’ in the Rain—the young thesp shoots to stardom, only to realize that show business isn’t all he hoped it would be.

Related Story

&#;Dispatches From Elsewhere&#;: Jason Segel Talks Casting Trans Actress Eve Lindley As Love Interest & Possibilities For Season 2 - TCA

Jason Segel in &#;Dispatches from Elsewhere&#;

Subsequently, we transition to a meeting where a familiar face describes his struggles with alcohol, and how lost and empty he feels after being used up by the industry that made him a star. At first, we think this is Peter—the character that series creator-star Jason Segel has played throughout Season 1. Soon, though, we learn that this isn’t Peter—that the person speaking is Segel, himself.

After the meeting, Jason bonds with Simone (Eve Lindley) over his inability to figure out his next move. He is then quickly inducted into the same mysterious game (or social experiment) the series has explored all along.

Setting out to find himself, Jason surrenders to the unknown, learning a couple of fundamental lessons along the way: 1) Neither he nor his pain is unique, and that’s OK; and 2) the only thing he needs to know at any given time is what to do next. Following confrontations with Simone and the boy in makeup (i.e., his younger self), Jason learns to take responsibility for his life, his choices and his pain, channeling the new perspective into a script called Dispatches from Elsewhere.

The season ends with Jason sitting in a field, surrounded by the series’ key characters, who comment on what they’ve seen. Jason directly addresses the audience—and in the series’ most meta moment yet, the camera pans out to reveal the entire cast and crew who brought Dispatches from Elsewhere to life.

Speaking with Deadline ahead of tonight&#;s broadcast, Segel discussed the inspiration behind the finale, the challenges of crafting his first series, and the prospect of a second season for the AMC anthology.

DEADLINE: How long have you had the finale for Dispatches in mind? 

JASON SEGEL: The whole season was really planned out. It’s so intricate, the way the storylines interweave throughout the season, that there really wasn’t another way to do it, besides having it all pretty firmly planned by the time we started shooting. We had basically all of the scripts by the time we got into production, so I was driving towards the finale, all the way from the end of the pilot.

DEADLINE: In the finale, you bring yourself into the series&#; world. How did you decide on the version of yourself you would play, and how honest you would be with that performance?

SEGEL: Well, I guess first off, the whole premise of the show is that we are all much more alike than we are led to believe—and if we were willing to be brave and honest with each other, it would be met with a familiar acceptance. “This person is me, in a lot of ways.”

So, what I asked myself was, do you mean it? [laughs] Do you really believe that? And if so, then prove it. So, that’s when I felt like the finale was an opportunity to say, “You know this premise of the show that we’ve been selling you, that we’re all in this together? Well, here. I’ll go first.”

DEADLINE: You’ve talked about this series as a more grown-up version of what you did with Forgetting Sarah Marshall, in terms of “baring it all.” In the case of that film, that phrase took on a quite literal meaning. But here, in a move that’s strikingly personal, you take us into your experience with Alcoholics Anonymous.

SEGEL: Well, I don’t talk about that specifically, for reasons of anonymity, but I do go into my journey…You know, just like we wrote Clara in the show, and the way that we use the little boy as a metaphor, you really set out into the world thinking that you’re going to accomplish everything and take the world by storm. Then, I think we all go through these different trials in our life—and to me, the more we talk about them with each other, the more freedom we have from them.

DEADLINE: Dispatches from Elsewhere is based on an “alternate reality” game created by artist Jeff Hull, which was depicted in the doc The Institute. Reportedly, you went through your own version of this experience as an initiation into Hull’s world, with hopes of securing the rights necessary to make the series. Was the finale intended, then, as a re-creation of that experience?

SEGEL: Yeah. The experience that I went through, I did right as I was doing End of the Tour, this movie about David Foster Wallace, so I was also reading Infinite Jest, and contemplating all these kind of lofty ideas about meaning and art. So, I think it caught me at exactly the right time—or we caught each other at exactly the right time—because I reacted to it in such a visceral way, where I thought, “Right. This is what good art is supposed to feel like. It’s supposed to make you feel taken over; you’re supposed to feel like a part of it, not just a witness to it.”

So, I really reacted strongly to going through the experience, and tried as hard as I could to make the TV show feel that same way. That was our big challenge, going through it. Like, what is the artistic value of taking a three-dimensional, living experience and turning it into a two-dimensional TV show? That’s when I started to have these ideas about [the series]—that it had to be weekly, so a community could form around the show and talk about it, and then to make the finale interactive.

DEADLINE: The finale&#;s interactive segment features a number of people directly addressing the camera—saying, for instance, “I am Melissa, and I am you.” Who did you have record these videos?

SEGEL: There are some people involved tangentially with the show, who we let be involved in the finale. But then, there has been, all along, an interactive component of the show that has been going on in the background, in the digital space. People who solved certain puzzles were encouraged to submit videos, so they’re the faces of the community that formed around the show.

DEADLINE: News hasn’t yet come regarding a second season of Dispatches. Do you have any updates?

SEGEL: I have no updates, no.

DEADLINE: Have you thought through ideas for a second season? Tonight’s finale seems like a natural conclusion to the series. But at the same time, Dispatches has been couched as an anthology, which could lend itself to new characters and storylines.

SEGEL: Yeah, it can be either an anthology or a limited [series], depending on how we decide to proceed. But the idea is that each season is stand-alone—and without giving too much away, each season would profile a specific thing, as the [Jejune] Institute was profiled in the first season.

DEADLINE: Do you have a sense of whether this might be the last time we see our four main characters—Peter, Janice, Fredwynn and Simone?

SEGEL: No, no idea.

DEADLINE: Assuming that’s the case, do you have notions of what might happen to them down the road that you can share?

SEGEL: I don’t, you know? I like the ellipses of it all. I like us imagining what might happen to each of those characters—will they stay in touch, [or] will they not. One of the things I love best about movies that have really impacted me is that they allow my imagination to do some of the work.

DEADLINE: As the first series you’ve created, in which you also star, what kind of learning curve did Dispatches from Elsewhere present?

SEGEL: It was definitely “trial by fire,&#; as our line producer said at the end of it, “though you started by doing the hardest thing.” I think there’s some truth to that, but I also had a lot of help. I had a lot of really talented people around me, and it really was a community that made the show. But yeah…I haven’t had moments where I felt like, “Oh my gosh, I might not pull this off” in like 20 years, and I had a ton of them on this show. So, that was really kind of thrilling. Like, I’ve never had an experience where you show up to shoot one day, and the set is locked. [Laughs] It’s like “Wait, what do we do now?” and you’re like, “I don’t know…I guess we can rewrite it to be out here.” It’s really cool, man. It felt a lot like when I was making stuff when I was in my early 20s.

DEADLINE: Clearly, this is a very personal project for you. What were some of the best aspects of bringing it to life?

SEGEL: I think the first thing you said about it being a personal project is really key, because one of the things I’ve realized, especially as I’m getting older, is that they should all be personal projects. You only get to make so many things, and especially to do it like this—to start with idea, and carry it all the way to it existing—it’s a lot of time and work. So, you start to ask yourself, “What is worth that work and time?”

To me, I’ve found having something that you really want to express, when the only way you know how to do it is through art, is a really good motivator. It felt like everybody involved was there because they had something that they wanted to express, so that was a real joy. From the DP to the art director, to the costumer to all my actors, everyone was there because they had something to say, and that was really cool.

DEADLINE: Dispatches began airing in February, prior to the new normal of self-quarantine brought on by the coronavirus pandemic—and now, as Season 1 wraps up, it’s almost hard to recall what life was like before it. It seems like the times we’re living in now have accentuated the themes of your show—particularly, the need for community.

SEGEL: To me, the pandemic has highlighted those elements that were already rearing their head. It’s been a really strange several years, and not just politically. I think we’ve had the best of intentions with things like social media, but I think the jury is still out on if it actually brings us closer together, or if we’re just sort of staring at our phones all day. [Laughs] So, I don’t know. It’s clear because I made the show, but I’ve been feeling this way for a long time.

DEADLINE: How has the pandemic affected you? Have you been writing throughout this period?

SEGEL: I am, yeah. You know, first, my heart and mind are with the people who are suffering, so it’s largely that. Then, besides that, you start to think about, “What do we all have to say about this period?” None of us have experienced anything like this, so to see how we process it, I think will be a really interesting thing, over the next few years.

DEADLINE: What’s next for you? Will we see more TV series from you in the future?

SEGEL: Yeah. I have some shows in mind that I’ve been writing, and I have some scripts done. And I always have movies in mind, so I’m working on all that kind of stuff. It’s interesting: These things have a life of their own. One or two of them tend to become like the alpha idea, and turn some of the other ideas into runt ideas. So, I’m just waiting to see what emerges from the litter.

DEADLINE: Have the How I Met Your Mother creators ever approached you for a possible reboot or spinoff?

SEGEL: No. Honest to God, we literally have never had that conversation…But who knows? Maybe someday, Lily and Marshall [will] have their moment in the sun.

DEADLINE: Recently, you’ve said that you’re more interested in working behind the camera than in chasing roles. Do you see yourself continuing to act, outside of the projects that you spearhead?

SEGEL: Yeah. I mean, listen. There is nothing more peaceful than doing a movie where you’re just an actor, where you just have one job. It may be my favorite time in my life; I feel really, really comfortable and happy when I’m doing it. [But] my career has never been built that way. The parts that I wanted to play were never coming very easily to me, so one of my first instincts was, “Well, then write them.” So, I think that’s like part of my DNA now, is if you’re not getting offered the parts you want to play, then create them.

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Sours: https://deadline.com//04/dispatches-from-elsewhere-jason-segel-seasonfinale-interview-spoilers/
Behind this world is a world that's been hidden from you. New series coming to AMC in A lot of names in this. First episode was weird. Jason's stuff can be weird. Cool to see him act, direct and produce the pilot.

Dispatches From Elsewhere cast: André Benjamin, Sally Field, Richard E. Grant. Dispatches From Elsewhere Release Date: 1 March Dispatches From Elsewhere Episodes: Dispatches From Elsewhere is looking full of Drama. Now I,m going to tells you all about Dispatches From Elsewhere TV Series ().

Dispatches From Elsewhere is an American Drama TV Series (). André Benjamin, Sally Field, Richard E. Grant are the main cast of Dispatches From Elsewhere TV Series (). Behind this world is a world that’s been hidden from you. New series coming to AMC in A lot of names in this. The first episode was weird. Jason’s stuff can be weird. Cool to see him act, direct and produce the pilot.

It’s like watching Jason Segel channeling Michel Gondry channeling was Anderson channeling terry Gilliam channeling rod serling. This looks like a Syfy show with the budget of a CW show. Dispatches From Elsewhere cast: André Benjamin, Sally Field, Richard E. Grant.

Dispatches From Elsewhere Release Date: 1 March Dispatches From Elsewhere Episodes: The whole thing gives me a super culty vibe. A lifetime opportunity to work on a show for AMC called Dispatches From Elsewhere, it airs this Sunday. I highly recommend everyone check it out.

Dispatches From Elsewhere Plot:

Four customary individuals feel there’s something missing in their lives, however can’t exactly place what it is, are united by some coincidence – or maybe it’s by plan.

Dispatches From Elsewhere Wiki:

TV Series: Dispatches From Elsewhere ()
Network: AMC
Main Stars: André Benjamin, Sally Field, Richard E. Grant
Genres:Drama
Country:USA
Language: English
Release Date: 1 March (USA)
Season: 1
Episodes: 10
Filming Locations: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Also KnownAs: Dispatches from Elsewhere, Dispatches From Elsewhere Season 1

Dispatches From Elsewhere TV Series () Poster

Dispatches From Elsewhere Cast:

André Benjamin As Fredwynn
Sally Field As Janice
Richard E. Grant As Octavio
Eve Lindley As Simone
Jason Segel As Peter
Cecilia Balagot As Clara
Tara Lynne Barr As Young Janice
Joe Forbrich
Cherise Boothe As Lee
Amanda Schoonover As Waitress
Ernest DiLullo Sr. As Audience Member
James Easter Bradford As Alternate Dimension Peter
Jennifer Butler As Jejune
Sean Patrick Folster As Sasquatch
Basil Kershner As Jejune
Terez Land As Diner Patron
Jeffrey Mowery As Camera Operator
Dante W Renzulli As Elsewhereian
Scot Teller As Dick Crew
Jayson Ward Williams As Boss
Heather Capuano As Salsa Dancer
Bella Dontine As JeJune
Deanna Dunagan As Nana
Bryan Enright As Audience Member
Joseph D Fisher As Octavio’s Bodyguard
Jibril Goodman As Audience member
Cherie Klenieski As Audience Member
Bob Leszczak As Pedestrian
Chelsea Marie Marlowe As Peter’s Coworker
John McKeever As Francis

Dispatches from Elsewhere is great and you should watch it. Jason Segel returns to television in AMC’s latest drama, ‘Dispatches From Elsewhere.’ After a commercial break, in the middle of streaming Better Call Saul, the app dropped me into the middle of Dispatches from Elsewhere. AMC’s ‘Dispatches from Elsewhere’ starring Jason Segel, André Benjamin, Sally Field & Richard E. Grant to feature original score by Atticus Ross, Leopold Ross & Claudia Sarne.

The series is as intriguing as it is heartfelt thanks to stylishly imaginative storytelling and richly developed characters. Jason Segel’s Dispatches from Elsewhere Series Premiere Sneak Peek. This new AMC Networks show Dispatches From Elsewhere is my new dreampunk jam.

Dispatches From Elsewhere cast: André Benjamin, Sally Field, Richard E. Grant. Dispatches From Elsewhere Release Date: 1 March Dispatches From Elsewhere Episodes: I’m really enjoying the aesthetic, which verges on vaporwave at times.

Sours: https://bestmoviecast.com/dispatches-from-elsewhere-cast-episodes/

Elsewhere wiki from dispatches

Dispatches from Elsewhere

American television series

Dispatches from Elsewhere is an American drama television series created by and starring Jason Segel that premiered on March 1, , on AMC.[1][2]

Premise[edit]

The series, set in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, follows "a group of ordinary people who stumble onto a puzzle hiding just behind the veil of everyday life. They will come to find that the mystery winds far deeper than they ever imagined."[3]

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

  • Jason Segel as Peter, a data worker struggling to find meaning in his life
  • André Benjamin as Fredwynn, an intelligent yet paranoid man dedicated to figuring out the truth
  • Eve Lindley as Simone, a trans woman seeking an escape from her feelings of isolation
  • Richard E. Grant as Octavio Coleman, Esq., the enigmatic head of the Jejune Institute
  • Sally Field as Janice Foster, an optimistic empty-nester trying to reclaim her sense of identity

Recurring[edit]

  • Tara Lynne Barr as Young Janice[4]
  • Cecilia Balagot as Clara
  • Cherise Boothe as Lee
  • Travis Burnett as Clown-Faced Boy
  • Joe Forbrich as The Milkman
  • Sean Patrick Folster as Bigfoot

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Jason Segelcreated the series and portrays the lead character.

On July 28, , it was announced that AMC had given the production a series order. The series was created by Jason Segel who also directed the pilot and serves as executive producer alongside Scott Rudin, Eli Bush, and Garrett Basch.[5][3][6][7] The series is based on the documentary film The Institute, which is the story of "Jejune Institute", an alternate reality game set in San Francisco.[8]

Segel said that he chose to shoot in Philadelphia because during location scouting he was surprised to learn that the city is full of colorful public art; he said seeing the Magic Gardens for the first time was the moment he knew Philly was the right location for the show.[9]

Early versions of the script were set in an unspecified city, and then were rewritten to be about specific Philadelphia locations.[9]

Casting[edit]

Alongside the series order announcement in July , it was announced that Jason Segel would star in the series.[3] In April , Richard E. Grant, Sally Field and Eve Lindley were added to the cast, with Andre Benjamin joining in July.[10][11]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography for the series commenced in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in July [3]

Future[edit]

In an interview in April after the first-season finale, Jason Segel commented on the possibility of a second season: "[I]t can be either an anthology or a limited [series], depending on how we decide to proceed. But the idea is that each season is stand-alone—and without giving too much away, each season would profile a specific thing, as the [Jejune] Institute was profiled in the first season."[12]

Episodes[edit]

Broadcast[edit]

Outside the US where the show is broadcast on AMC, in the UK it premiered on April 29, , on BT TV.[23]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the series has an 86% rating with an average score of out of 10 based on 36 reviews. The website's critical consensus is, "A weird and whimsical journey into the unknown, Dispatches from Elsewhere's experimental approach doesn't always coalesce, but committed performances and a genuine sense of wonder make it a trip worth taking."[24] On Metacritic, it has a score of 66 out of based on 16 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[25]

Keith Phipps of TV Guide gave it a 4/5 rating and wrote, "What is going on is no clearer at the end of the first four episodes. That also doesn't really matter all that much. The series is as intriguing as it is heartfelt thanks to stylishly imaginative storytelling and richly developed characters."[8]Alan Sepinwall of Rolling Stone gave it a 3/5 star review and wrote, "Does Dispatches From Elsewhere earn its quirkiness? It's hard to tell based on the limited sample of episodes AMC made available to critics. But it's not boring, and its optimism is appealing in and of itself."[26]

Accolades[edit]

For the 32nd GLAAD Media Awards, the series was nominated for Outstanding Limited or Anthology Series.[27]

Alternate reality game (ARG)[edit]

In October , fliers promoting a fictional entity called The New Noology Network (NNN) were found in the U.S. and Canada, advertising a study on recording dreams. This directed people towards the NNN's Twitch channel apparently broadcasting patient sessions live, until it was revealed to be a farce. Shortly after, NNN reached out to get participants to record themselves doing seemingly absurd tasks, similar in nature to the instructions given to participants of The Jejune Institute.[28]

Participants eventually figured out that this ARG was indeed directly connected to Dispatches from Elsewhere. Hidden clues in each episode starting from the second one led to clues tracking the location of a van, furthering the progress of the ARG and mirroring the search for Clara in the show. The final episode featured some of the participants' recordings of tasks from before, particularly recordings of themselves saying "I am (participant's name), and I am you", mimicking a line from the show. Segel himself was responsible for choosing which recordings to use in the finale, and contacting the chosen participants telling them to keep the secret. More clues led to a private video message from Segel thanking participants for their involvement.[29][30]

ARG company Hexagram was responsible for creating the ARG with involvement from Segel, AMC's VP of digital content Kevin Dreyfuss, and AMC's director of digital media Sarah LeTrent.[30][31] Hexagram enlisted Sludge to produce the live interactive content for the ARG, filming on location in New Mexico. Due to the COVID pandemic, instead of a grand finale with a live audience, the remainder of the ARG was re-scripted, telling players to stay safe at home and tune in to the remaining live streams.[31][32]

References[edit]

  1. ^Roots, Kimberly (November 25, ). "Sally Field and Jason Segel Receive Mysterious Dispatches From Elsewhere in New AMC Drama's First Teaser". TVLine. Retrieved February 22,
  2. ^"AMC's "Dispatches from Elsewhere" to Debut with Two-Night Premiere Event". The Futon Critic. December 5, Retrieved February 22,
  3. ^ abcdAndreeva, Nellie (July 28, ). "Jason Segel Anthology Series 'Dispatches from Elsewhere' Gets AMC Series Order". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved July 28,
  4. ^Denise Petski (July 18, ). "Dispatches From Elsewhere: Tara Lynne Barr To Recur In Jason Segel's AMC Anthology Series". Deadline. Retrieved November 27,
  5. ^Baysinger, Tim (July 17, ). "Outkast's Andre Joins Jason Segel's AMC Anthology Series 'Dispatches From Elsewhere'". The Wrap. Retrieved January 8,
  6. ^Maglio, Tony (July 28, ). "AMC Orders Jason Segel Anthology Series 'Dispatches From Elsewhere'". TheWrap. Retrieved July 28,
  7. ^Schwartz, Ryan (July 28, ). "Jason Segel to Star in, Create AMC Anthology Dispatches From Elsewhere". TVLine. Retrieved July 28,
  8. ^ abPhipps, Keith (February 10, ). "Dispatches from Elsewhere Review: Jason Segel Returns to TV With a Bold, Unpredictable Series". TV Guide. Retrieved February 22,
  9. ^ abGray, Ellen (February 25, ). "How Jason Segel fell for Philly and why he made his new TV show here". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved February 26,
  10. ^Thorne, Will (April 9, ). "Richard E. Grant, Sally Field Join Jason Segel Series 'Dispatches From Elsewhere' at AMC". Variety. Retrieved February 22,
  11. ^Saponara, Michael (July 18, ). "André Joins Cast of AMC's 'Dispatches From Elsewhere'". Billboard. Retrieved February 22,
  12. ^Grobar, Matt (April 27, ). "'Dispatches From Elsewhere' Finale: Jason Segel On Injecting Himself Into His Series' World And What He Knows About A Possible Season 2". Deadline. Retrieved May 26,
  13. ^Metcalf, Mitch (March 3, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on March 3, Retrieved March 3,
  14. ^Metcalf, Mitch (March 3, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on March 3, Retrieved March 3,
  15. ^Metcalf, Mitch (March 10, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on March 11, Retrieved March 10,
  16. ^Metcalf, Mitch (March 17, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on March 17, Retrieved March 17,
  17. ^Metcalf, Mitch (March 24, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on March 24, Retrieved March 24,
  18. ^Metcalf, Mitch (March 31, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on April 1, Retrieved March 31,
  19. ^Metcalf, Mitch (April 7, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on April 7, Retrieved April 7,
  20. ^Metcalf, Mitch (April 14, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on April 17, Retrieved April 14,
  21. ^Metcalf, Mitch (April 21, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on April 21, Retrieved April 21,
  22. ^Metcalf, Mitch (April 28, ). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on April 29, Retrieved April 28,
  23. ^Moore, Sam (January 31, ). "Richard E. Grant-starring 'Dispatches From Elsewhere' UK premiere date announced". NME. Retrieved April 24,
  24. ^"Dispatches from Elsewhere: Season 1 ()". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved May 31,
  25. ^"Dispatches from Elsewhere: Season 1". Metacritic. Retrieved May 31,
  26. ^Sepinwall, Alan (February 27, ). "'Dispatches From Elsewhere' Review: A Journey Into the Weird Beyond". Rolling Stone. Retrieved March 2,
  27. ^Shaffer, Claire (January 28, ). "'Schitt's Creek,' 'The Prom' Nominated for 32nd Annual GLAAD Media Awards". Rolling Stone. Retrieved January 29,
  28. ^Andersen, Michelle (October 29, ). "New Noology Network Goes Beyond the Jejune". ARGNet: Alternate Reality Gaming Network. Retrieved February 3,
  29. ^"What Happened To The Elsewhere Society? - Inside A Mind". YouTube. December 14, Retrieved February 3,
  30. ^ abMaas, Jennifer (May 11, ). "An Alternate Reality Game Helped Create the 'Dispatches From Elsewhere' Finale". TheWrap. Retrieved March 22,
  31. ^ abSolomon, Brian (May 18, ). "Behind the Experience: New Noology Network". Linkedin. Retrieved March 22,
  32. ^"New Noology Network". Sludge.io. Retrieved March 22,

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dispatches_from_Elsewhere
Dispatches From Elsewhere (AMC): Episode 1 - TV Review

These days, plenty of television series are based on true stories. But AMC’s new show, Dispatches From Elsewhere, doesn’t sound like one of them. It tells the story of four very different strangers, played by Sally Field, André Benjamin, newcomer Eve Lindley, and showrunner Jason Segel, who are all thrown together via a secret scavenger hunt-like game. In this world, the Jejune Institute, a sort of love child of the DHARMA Initiative and the Church of Scientology, promises to expand human potential through its astounding technological advances, like a camera that can take pictures of the past. Opposing Jejune and its mysterious leader, Octavio Coleman, Esq. (played by Richard E. Grant), is the Elsewhere Society, an Occupy-style outsider movement. The show’s characters are drawn into the world of these dueling and deeply strange organizations, both of which are on the hunt for long-missing young woman named Eva.

In terms of stories that sound as if they could only be fictional, Dispatches From Elsewhere ranks somewhere between Watchmen and Westworld. And yet it’s very much based on real events. Okay, so the Jejune Institute and its dolphin communication technology are made-up creations. But it’s true that, for years, thousands of people embed themselves in this game and its intrigue.

In , flyers very like the ones Peter notices in Dispatches’ premier began popping up around San Francisco. Whether they advertised a “personal human force field” or a “memory to media center” able to “render moving video images from your active memory,” all directed readers to call the Jejune Institute‘s telephone number or visit its website. Those who did were given instructions to visit an office building, where they were inducted into the game via a video featuring a man who claimed to be Jejune founder Octavio Coleman. From there, participants embarked on a treasure-hunt like adventure that brought them deep into the story.

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It was all part of an elaborate alternate reality adventure called Games of Nonchalance, which was created by Oakland-based artist Jeff Hull. In the documentary about the project, The Institute, co-producer Uriah Finley, described it as, “a game that you play by going out into the city and doing things, and as you do that you become part of the story that is unfolding.” Hull said that he wanted the project to encourage “spontaneity and play into our civic spaces.” To pull off the complicated endeavor, its creators recruited actors and also involved regular people and businesses, and hid clues in everyday objects like street signs, bricks, and pay phones. Before the game ended its three-year run in , more than 7, people participated.

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After watching the documentary, Segel “was like, ‘Oh my gosh, this is what I’ve been looking for,’” he told The New York Times. The How I Met Your Mother star reached out to Hull and received the artist’s permission to adapt the game into a fictionalized project.

Dispatches incorporates tons of real-life game elements into the story, including lines from the videos and recordings used in the original project. When Peter first responds to a Jejune Institute flier, the voice on the other line invites him to his induction by telling him that, “to those dark horses with the spirit to look up and see, a recondite family awaits.” It’s a line that played on the “real-life” Jejune Institute phone number. And the show’s characters embody the different approaches real people took to the game. Some players, like Benjamin’s Fredwynne, took it all a little too seriously, while others, like Lindley’s character Simone, approached it as a fun viral game. “I felt like I’d felt before when I was watching a movie, and the movie ended, and I left the movie theater,” one participant interviewed in The Institute said, “and everything outside seem better than it did before that, like the colors are brighter or the world looks like a different place.” Peter says almost the exact same lines in the series’ premier.

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While it’s clear that the series has drawn heavily from Hull’s real-life gameplay, where it’s all going is less obvious. Will Peter, Simone, Fredwynne, and Field’s Janice learn that their game is actually the creation of some intrepid local artists? Or in this world, are the Jejune Institute and the Elsewhere Societyreal. As in, not based-on-a-game real, but real real. We’ll have to watch and see.

Gabrielle BruneyGabrielle Bruney is a writer and editor for Esquire, where she focuses on politics and culture.

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DNewsCafe : Dispatches From Elsewhere is an American Drama TV Series (). André Benjamin, Sally Field, Richard E. Grant are the main cast of Dispatches From Elsewhere TV Series (). Behind this world is a world that’s been hidden from you. New series coming to AMC in A lot of names in this. The first episode was weird. Jason’s stuff can be weird. Cool to see him act, direct and produce the pilot.

Dispatches From Elsewhere Plot

Four customary individuals feel there’s something missing in their lives, however can’t exactly place what it is, are united by some coincidence – or maybe it’s by plan.

Dispatches From Elsewhere Wiki

TV SeriesDispatches From Elsewhere ()
Year
Network / Platform / ChannelAMC
Star CastAndré Benjamin, Sally Field, Richard E. Grant
GenreDrama
CountryUSA
LanguageEnglish
Release Date1st March,
Season1
No of Episodes10
Also Known AsDispatches from Elsewhere, Dispatches From Elsewhere Season 1
IMDb RatingNot Available
Google RatingNot Available
Rotten Tomatoes RatingNot Available
Filming LocationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Dispatches From Elsewhere Cast

  • André Benjamin As Fredwynn
  • Sally Field As Janice
  • Richard E. Grant As Octavio
  • Eve Lindley As Simone
  • Jason Segel As Peter
  • Cecilia Balagot As Clara
  • Tara Lynne Barr As Young Janice
  • Joe Forbrich
  • Cherise Boothe As Lee
  • Amanda Schoonover As Waitress
  • Ernest DiLullo Sr. As Audience Member
  • James Easter Bradford As Alternate Dimension Peter
  • Jennifer Butler As Jejune
  • Sean Patrick Folster As Sasquatch
  • Basil Kershner As Jejune
  • Terez Land As Diner Patron
  • Jeffrey Mowery As Camera Operator
  • Dante W Renzulli As Elsewhereian
  • Scot Teller As Dick Crew
  • Jayson Ward Williams As Boss
  • Heather Capuano As Salsa Dancer
  • Bella Dontine As JeJune
  • Deanna Dunagan As Nana
  • Bryan Enright As Audience Member
  • Joseph D Fisher As Octavio’s Bodyguard
  • Jibril Goodman As Audience member
  • Cherie Klenieski As Audience Member
  • Bob Leszczak As Pedestrian
  • Chelsea Marie Marlowe As Peter’s Coworker
  • John McKeever As Francis

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