Mayo clinic oil pulling

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Debunking 8 Common Dental Myths &#; Misconceptions

The truth: Radiation is a scary word but in reality, dental x-rays do not pose a risk to your health.

In the grand scheme of things, virtually nothing we do on a day-to-day basis exposes us to a dangerous amount of radiation.

Everywhere we go, we’re exposed to what’s known as “background radiation” — essentially the amount of radiation we get just from living our daily lives.

Imagine walking through the security scanner at the airport. The scan is equal to 80 times the daily level of background radiation exposure. A chest x-ray at the hospital is equal to 1, times the background level of radiation.

When it comes to medical x-rays, dental images are very very low in radiation. A full set of dental x-rays (including 4 bitewing x-rays) is less than a single day’s background radiation. It’s about equal to what you’d get from flying in an airplane from Medford to Seattle.

Dental radiation safety is something we take seriously, taking every precaution and investing in imaging technology that uses the least radiation possible.

In other words, dental x-rays shouldn’t be on your list of things to worry about. Their ability to aid in the early detection of dental health problem is invaluable.

Keep reading: Chart to help you better understand the radiation exposure in the world around us.

Sours: https://www.roguevalleydentist.com/dental-health-myths-debunked/

Is Coconut Oil Pulling Safe?

Coconut oil pulling is generally safe, but it could be considered unsafe in the following scenarios:

  • You have an allergy to coconuts or coconut oil.
  • You swallow the coconut oil following the pulling process. When you finish oil pulling, be sure to spit out the oil that has collected bacteria in your mouth. Swallowing it may result in stomach discomfort or diarrhea.
  • You totally replace all toothbrushing, flossing, and other oral care with coconut oil pulling. For proper oral hygiene, brush twice a day — once after breakfast and once before bed — floss once a day, eat a healthy diet, and see your dentist regularly.

Keep reading to learn more about coconut oil pulling and how to do it safely.

What is oil pulling?

Oil pulling is an ancient Ayurvedic oral hygiene therapy. Although there may be other purported benefits to using oil pulling, this alternative therapy is meant primarily to remove bacteria and stimulate saliva production.

Oil pulling is basically swishing oil — such as coconut oil, sesame oil, or olive oil — around your mouth. As you swish the oil around your mouth, it is “pulled” between the teeth. When you are done, you spit out the oil.

Many people suggest that oil pulling can improve oral health with minimal risks.

In fact, a study on oil pulling indicated that there were no adverse reactions to any hard or soft tissues of the oral cavity. But it’s important to note that this study used refined sunflower oil, not coconut oil.

Why coconut oil?

Recently, coconut oil has become popular for oil pulling because it:

  • has a pleasant taste
  • is easily available
  • has high amounts of antimicrobial lauric acid

A few studies have looked at which oil is best for oil pulling. Some have indicated that coconut oil is a good choice:

  • A study concluded that for reducing the severity of gingivitis, coconut oil pulling is more effective than oil pulling with sesame oil.
  • A study found that for reducing the bacteria associated with tooth decay (Streptococcus mutans), coconut oil pulling was as effective as the prescription mouthwash chlorhexidine.
  • A highlighted the strong bactericidal properties of lauric acid.
  • A indicated that the lauric acid in coconut oil, when mixed with alkalis in saliva, reduces plaque adhesion and accumulation.

How do you oil pull?

If you’ve used mouthwash, you know how to oil pull. Here’s how:

  1. First thing in the morning, on an empty stomach, put about 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in your mouth.
  2. Swish the oil all around your mouth for about 20 minutes.
  3. Spit out the oil.
  4. Brush your teeth as you regularly do.

Consider spitting out the oil into a tissue and then throwing it in the trash to avoid oil building up and clogging your drain pipe.

Are there any side effects?

Although typically not dangerous to your health, you might experience a few minor side effects from oil pulling. For instance, at first, putting oil in your mouth might make you feel a little nauseous.

Other potential side effects may include:

These side effects tend to diminish as you become used to oil pulling. For example, the sore jaw and headache may be caused by the rigorous motion of swishing the oil, which you may not be accustomed to doing.

Takeaway

Oil pulling with coconut oil is a simple way to possibly reduce potential cavities, gingivitis, and bad breath.

Coconut oil pulling is generally considered low risk, but it could be unsafe if you:

  • have a coconut allergy
  • swallow it after the pulling process
  • use it as your only oral hygiene method

If you’re considering the addition of coconut oil pulling or any other alternative therapy to your dental regimen, discuss it with your dentist before starting.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/health/coconut-oil-pulling-dangers
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Oil pulling and importance of traditional medicine in oral health maintenance

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Oil pulling is a popular natural remedy for detoxing the mouth and improving oral health. But does it actually work? Learn what dental professionals have to say about the success of oil pulling and the best ways to keep your mouth healthy and happy.

Plenty of people swear by natural remedies when it comes to whitening teeth and detoxing the mouth. Oil pulling is an ancient practice believed to help remove impurities from the body and improve oral health. With any oral health remedy, it's important to get the facts and talk with your dentist to decide what's best for you.

What is Oil Pulling?
Oil pulling is meant to remove bacteria and stimulate saliva production, among other benefits. As described in an article in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, oil pulling generally involves swishing a tablespoon full of oil around your mouth first thing in the morning. The oil is "pulled" between the teeth and all around the mouth for up to 20 minutes. At the end of the pulling, when the oil is milky and thin, spit it out in the trash. Never swallow the oil after pulling — it's full of bacteria.

Does Oil Pulling Work?
There have been numerous studies on oil pulling's effect on oral health and hygiene, and discussion about which type of oil is best.

  • One study noted that oil pulling with coconut oil was as effective as chlorhexidine, a prescription mouthwash, in the reduction of Streptococcus mutans, the bacteria believed to cause tooth decay.
  • Another study published in the Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine concluded that oil pulling with coconut oil is more effective than sesame oil in reducing the severity of gingivitis.
  • Olive oil is also believed to be a good substance for oil pulling because its ingredients have antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

Although these and other small-scale studies draw positive conclusions about oil pulling, the American Dental Association (ADA) does not consider oil pulling to be a reliable dental hygiene practice or a replacement for brushing and flossing.

Oil Pulling Side Effects
There aren't any known physical side effects from oil pulling. However, you might notice a sore jaw or headache at first from the rigorous motion of oil pulling. If you swallow the oil, it could cause an upset stomach or diarrhea.

Oil pulling should never be used in place of brushing and flossing. Always adhere to your dentist's recommended dental regimen, and only add in alternative therapies like oil pulling after discussion with your dentist.

How to Keep Your Mouth Healthy
Unfortunately, there's no magic remedy to make your teeth perfectly white and healthy. What's been proven to work over time is developing and maintaining a proper oral care routine. While brushing and flossing provide the foundation for such a routine, the steps to maintaining it are rather simple:

  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet
  • Use a fluoride-based toothpaste
  • Drink fluoridated water
  • Use a mouth rinse if your dentist recommends it

Most importantly, floss every day and brush in the morning and evening.

You only get one set of permanent teeth, so taking care of them is essential. Oil pulling does have some promising attributes, but more research needs to be done to prove its effectiveness and safety. No matter which natural remedies you're interested in trying, never give up your daily brushing and flossing for a healthy smile.

Sours: https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/adult-oral-care/coconut-oil-pulling-dangers

Clinic oil pulling mayo

Tooth Cavities

What are cavities?

A cavity, also called tooth decay, is a hole that forms in your tooth. Cavities start small and gradually become bigger when they’re left untreated. Because many cavities don’t cause pain in the beginning, it can be hard to realize that a problem exists. Regular dental appointments can detect tooth decay early.

According to the Mayo Clinic, cavities and tooth decay are some of the most common health problems in the world. Anyone with teeth can develop cavities, including babies.

Finding out that you have a cavity might come as a surprise. This is especially true if you think you have a good oral hygiene routine. However, even if your dentist delivers this news, there are ways to treat a cavity and prevent new ones from forming.

Causes of tooth cavities

Tooth cavities are caused by plaque, a sticky substance that binds to teeth. Plaque is a combination of:

  • bacteria
  • saliva
  • acid
  • food particles

Everyone has bacteria in their mouth. After eating or drinking foods with sugar, bacteria in your mouth turn sugar into acid. Plaque starts forming on your teeth soon after eating or drinking anything sugary. This is why regular brushing is important.

Plaque sticks to your teeth, and the acid in plaque can slowly erode tooth enamel. Enamel is a hard, protective coating on your teeth that protects against tooth decay. As your tooth enamel weakens, the risk for decay increases.

Everyone is at risk for cavities, but some people have a higher risk. Risk factors include:

  • too many sugary or acidic foods and drinks
  • a poor oral hygiene routine, such as failing to brush or floss daily
  • not getting enough fluoride
  • dry mouth
  • eating disorders, such as anorexia and bulimia
  • acid reflux disease, which can result in stomach acid wearing down your tooth enamel

Cavities develop more often in the back teeth, according to the Mayo Clinic. These teeth have grooves and openings that can trap food particles. Also, these teeth are sometimes harder to reach when brushing and flossing.

Treatment options for tooth cavities

Tell your doctor about uncomfortable symptoms like tooth sensitivity or pain. Your dentist can identify tooth decay after an oral exam. The Healthline FindCare tool can provide options in your area if you don’t already have a dentist. However, some cavities aren’t visible from an oral exam. So your dentist may use a dental X-ray to look for decay.

Treatment options depend on severity. There are several ways to treat a cavity.

Tooth fillings

A dentist uses a drill and removes decayed material from a tooth. Your dentist then fills your tooth with a substance, such as silver, gold, or composite resin.

Crowns

For more severe decay, your dentist may place a custom-fit cap over your tooth to replace its natural crown. Your dentist will remove decayed tooth material before starting this procedure.

Root canal

When tooth decay causes the death of your nerves, your dentist will perform a root canal to save your tooth. They remove the nerve tissue, blood vessel tissues, and any decayed areas of your tooth. Your dentist then checks for infections and applies medication to the roots as needed. Finally, they fill the tooth, and they might even place a crown on it.

Early stage treatment

If your dentist detects a tooth cavity in its early stage, a fluoride treatment may restore your tooth enamel and prevent further decay.

Dealing with pain

Cavities and tooth decay can be the cause of a lot of pain and discomfort. You may want to find ways to soothe irritation while you wait for your dentist appointment. According to the Mayo Clinic, there are a few things you can do to deal with discomfort temporarily:

  • Keep up your oral hygiene routine.Continue to brush and clean all parts of your mouth, including any sensitive areas.
  • Try over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers.Check with your doctor if you can use OTC anesthetics.
  • Watch what you eat.Stay away from extremely hot or cold foods when eating or drinking.

Complications from tooth cavities

A tooth cavity can cause a variety of complications if it’s left untreated. These include:

  • ongoing tooth pain
  • a tooth abscess, which can become infected and trigger life-threatening complications, like an infection that enters the bloodstream or sepsis
  • the development of pus around the infected tooth
  • an increased risk for breaking or chipping a tooth
  • difficulty chewing food

You may cause damage to your tooth that can’t be reversed if you put off seeing a dentist. At this point, the only way to fix the cavity is for your dentist to remove the tooth and replace it with an implant or bridge.

Preventing tooth cavities

Tooth cavities are a common dental problem, but you can reduce your risk by doing the following:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice per day with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss at least once daily, as recommended by the American Dental Association.
  • Eat fewer sugary and acidic foods, like sweets, candy, juice, soda, and refined carbohydrates.
  • Limit snacking between meals.
  • Consider getting dental sealants on your teeth.

The following foods can help fight tooth decay:

  • fiber-rich fruits and vegetables
  • calcium-rich foods
  • xylitol sugarless chewing gum
  • unsweetened black or green tea
  • water with fluoride

Also, don’t forget to visit your dentist at least twice per year for regular teeth cleanings. This allows you to get treatment for any problems your dentist finds, and it will help prevent future dental problems.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/find-care/articles/dentists/tooth-cavities
Mayo Clinic Minute: Coconut oil — perfect, poison or somewhere in between?

Good Health,Naturally 

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Sours: http://padhamhealthnews.org/tag/mayo-clinic-coconut-oil-pulling/

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And I will do it as best I can.



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