Best buy corsair case

Best buy corsair case DEFAULT

The best PC case top cases for your desktop computer

The best PC cases are there for more than just showcasing the epic RGB lighting on your internals. While many computer chassis come in awesome designs meant to show off your components and their RGB lighting or flaunt your gaming PC’s prowess, they’re first and foremost meant to shelter and protect those internals. 

PC cases are designed to keep dust and debris away as well as ensure that your processor, graphics card, and motherboard are getting more than enough ventilation to keep them cool and working optimally. So, when you’re building your own PC, regardless of whether it’s for your new work-from-home setup or for gaming, choosing the perfect PC case is just as vital as choosing the right components for your needs.

We found the best PC cases has to offer, ones that offer excellent ventilation, a great design, and even additional empty bays for future-proofing. Check out our list and the included price comparison tool so you can find the best prices available.

1. Corsair iCue RGB X

An imposing (and expensive) tower of glass

Specifications

Form factor: Mid-tower

Dimensions: mm x mm x mm (L x W x H; x x inches)

Mobo compatibility: ATX

PSU support: Bottom mount

I/O: (1x) USB Type C, (2x) USB , (1x) Audio in/out

Reasons to buy

+Incredibly stylish and open design+Great out-of-the-box airflow

Reasons to avoid

-Attaching and removing most removable internal pieces is frustrating

A hulking glass beast is what you’re getting with the Corsair iCue RGB X whose offerings include good cooling – thanks in large part to its mesh coverings around the top and bottom panels, a lot of space for efficient building, and three Corsair RGB fans. And, it delivers all those while looking incredibly sleek, albeit massive. It might be a bit pricey for some folks, but for those whose top priorities include airflow and space, it’s worth the price.

Read the full review: Corsair iCue RGB X

2. Fractal Design Meshify-C

The best mid-tower PC case

Specifications

Form factor: Mid-tower

Dimensions: x x mm (L x W x H; x x )

PSU support: ATX

I/O: 2 x USB , 1 x HD audio in/out, power button, reset button

Includes: 2 x Dynamic X2 GP

Reasons to buy

+Freshly designed in multiple ways+Reasonable price

Reasons to avoid

-USB cable is too short Front-PSU dust filter is hard to remove

It is extremely rare to see any PC case that even vaguely resembles the Fractal Design Meshify-C. Given that the front of the case is entirely made of a mesh material sectioned off into an array of polygonal shapes, the Meshify-C has a unique style – without compromising on function. With two fans pre-installed, cooling is (forgive us) a breeze, even if the Meshify-C is held back by a number of obstacles. 

3. Nanoxia Deep Silence 4

The best Micro ATX PC case

Specifications

Form factor: Small form factor

Dimensions: x x mm (W x H x D; 15 x x inches)

PSU support: ATX

I/O: 2 x USB , 1 x USB , HD audio in/out, power button, reset button, two-channel fan control

Includes: 2 x mm fans, 2 x modular HDD cages for up to five hard drives

Reasons to buy

+Low-noise+Onboard dual-zone fan controls

Reasons to avoid

- Not many extras 

As its name suggests, the Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 has the sole purpose of being quiet as a mouse. This silence-focused case is a well-balanced Micro ATX chassis that’s affordably priced, without sacrificing room for expansion. That’s right you can fit even the biggest, most powerful graphics cards in the Nanoxia Deep Silence 4. The fact that you will never hear it go above 30 decibels is just icing on the very taciturn cake. 

  • This product is only available in the US and UK at the time of this writing. Australian readers: check out a fine alternative in the Phanteks Evolv Shift X. 

4. NZXT Hi

The best Mini-ITX case

Specifications

Form factor: Small form factor

Dimensions: x x mm ( x x )

Mobo compatibility: Mini-ITX

PSU support: ATX

I/O: 2 x USB Gen 1, 1 x audio/mic, 3 x fan channels with max 10W per channel output, 1 x RGB LED port support up to 4 x HUE + LED strips or 5 x Aer RGB fans

Includes: 1 x Aer F Case Version top fan, 1 x Aer F Case Version rear fan

Reasons to buy

+Built-in Smart Device RGB control+Adaptive noise reduction

Reasons to avoid

-Slightly pricey

Every single day mini-ITX gets more popular, and closer to toppling Micro ATX. And, it makes sense – why not spring for a small computer that can get just as much work done as a full tower? NZXT’s new H-series case line manages to integrate a ton of the same features as its Micro ATX and mid-tower equivalents, with mesmerizing, built-in and smart device-controlled RGB lighting and an adaptive noise sensor that sees improvement only by way of the Grid+ V3 fan controller.

5. Phanteks Evolv Shift X

The best home theater PC case

Specifications

Form factor: Small form factor

Dimensions: x x mm (W x H x D; x x inches)

Mobo compatibility: Mini-ITX

PSU support: SFX, SFX-L, ATX (mm max)

I/O: 2 x USB , power button, RGB button

Includes: 2 x mm fan, 1 x power supply cover, 1 x pump bracket, 2 x SSD bracket, 1 x PCIe x16 Riser cable, 1 x 8-pin CPU extension cable

Reasons to buy

+Plenty of room for beefy components+One-of-a-kind aesthetic

Reasons to avoid

- Massive for Mini-ITX

When you first look at the Phanteks Evolv Shift X, it looks more like a sound bar than one of the best PC cases, but this helps it vanish into any living area or studio setup. It’s flexible to the point that it looks natural placed under a TV as it does on a desk, next to one of the best gaming monitors. It may only be compatible with a Mini-ITX motherboard, but the Phanteks Evolv Shift X offers tons of space for components and liquid cooling loops. If this case is  a little large for your preference, you can get the smaller Phanteks Evolv Shift for easier management.

6. Fractal Design Define R5

The best silent PC case

Specifications

Form factor: Mid-tower

Dimensions: x x mm (W x H x D; x x inches)

PSU support: ATX

I/O: 2 x USB , 2 x USB , audio in/out, power button with LED, HDD activity LED, reset button

Includes: 2 x Fractal Design Dynamic GP14 mm fans, velcro straps

TODAY'S BEST DEALS

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/news/computing-components/upgrades/best-pc-gaming-casereviewed

Best PC Cases Our Tested Picks for Your New Build

Choosing the best PC case for your build often gets overlooked, or pushed off until the very end of the part-picking process. When building a new PC, you might start off choosing one of the best CPUs for gaming and the best graphics card for your needs and budget. You’ll then want to pick the best motherboard for your system, and perhaps some storage devices. But builders frequently overlook the case, thinking of it as just a box to put your components in.

But the truth couldn’t be further from that. Getting the best PC case is key, because it's arguably what forms the identity of your computer, dictating not only its looks but also what fits inside, the noise levels in your room, and the cooling potential for your rig as well. You can choose to go for a small ITX case to minimize your system’s footprint on your desk, like Phanteks’ excellent Evolv Shift 2, or you can get a chassis like Fractal Design’s Meshify 2 to house a big, badass workstation with endless expansion possibilities.

Below we’ve compiled a list of the best PC cases from the dozens of models we've tested. As long as you check whether the parts you want will fit and you like the looks, one of these cases should keep you happy for years to come.

Recent Case News 

Over the last few weeks, it's been busy in the world of cases--especially in the Mini-ITX space. Hyte, a new brand owned by iBuyPower, introduced the Revolt 3 chassis that left us highly impressed, Cooler Master’s NRP Max blew us away too with its highly complete package that includes a case, W PSU and mm AIO. But, Lian Li’s Q58 is the ITX chassis that may have left us most impressed, packing a proper system into a tiny case that balances airflow, looks, and size better than any other -- and it’s available starting at just $ 

Meanwhile, it hasn’t been quiet in the ATX space either. Low and behold, it's again Lian Li that delivers a winner: The O11 Air Mini. Although it is in fact bigger than the original O11D Mini, it swaps the glass front for a mesh panel, throws in some fans, and keeps nearly the same price. With handsome looks, it’s a case to seriously consider for your next mid-sized build. 

NZXT also revealed its H Flow, updating the timeless classic with a mesh front. Although it’s a good case, current pandemic and market conditions have pushed its price a little too high. 

Quick PC Case Shopping Tips

  • Figure out what parts you have/want first. Before prioritizing looks, you’ll want to know what motherboard, graphics card, and cooler you’ll be using, plus how many drives you’ll want to install. This will dictate the size of the cases to consider.
  • Cooling is key, especially in small cases. Airflow is important in choosing the best PC case, especially when it comes to high-end components in tight spaces. Check our cooler reviews for our cooling test results before buying, and remember that cases with glass fronts and tops restrict airflow and may need extra fans.
  • Choose a chassis that you like to look at. Your case of choice is likely to spend lots of time in your peripheral vision. Don’t forget to check airflow and that your parts will fit. But after that, find something that appeals to you visually. Take the time to find a case that appeals to you visually.

The Best PC Cases You Can Buy Today

1. Fractal Design Meshify 2 Compact

Best All Round Compact ATX Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (2) ” (2) ”

Included Fans: (3) 2x, mm, 1x mm

Reasons to buy

+Thoughtful Interior and cable management+Ships with 3 quality fans+Excellent thermal performance and easy filter access

Reasons to avoid

-Materials could be better-Fans don’t have PWM control-No RGB

Fractal Design’s Meshify 2 Compact offers an excellent foundation for simple ATX gaming systems, and a chassis that will stand the test of time well. It doesn’t go out of its way to be eccentric, rather providing the user with a classy chassis that will look good for a long time to come -- a chassis you can grow up with. 

And while its materials quality could be seen as a little lacking, this is a case where you pay for its excellent design, not only in looks, but also practicality: it has tons of cable management space, is laid out logically and with easy to access filters, a breeze to use and maintain as your daily driver. 

The biggest catch to this case is its slightly steep price and lack of RGB, but we believe it’s worth paying just for how well thought-out its practical design is. 

Read: Meshify 2 Compact Review 

2. Lian Li O11 Mini Air

Best Compact ATX Case

Specifications

Type: ATX Case

Motherboard Support: ATX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (4) ” (2) ”

Included Fans: 2x mm PWM, 1x mm PWM

Reasons to buy

+Improved cooling and 3 PWM fans+Supports ATX boards and PSUs+Affordable at $

Reasons to avoid

- Ditches aluminum panels for steel-No longer as ITX-focused-Ugly bottom air filter implementation remains

Lian Li’s PC-O11 Dynamic has been a staple, go-to PC case for pretty builds in recent years, but its days might be numbered. The O11D Mini was inspired by its design, but had a few issues. But now, the O11 Air Mini comes in as a brilliant alternative. 

Priced at just $, you get a lot for your money with this case, including three PWM fans, bits of pretty aluminum, a glass panel, handsome looks, plentiful IO, a brilliant internal design and full ATX compatibility. 

The chassis features an unusual side-by-side chambered design, but building in it is a breeze and its performance is well up to snuff by modern standards. With this many features, great handsome styling, and such value for money, it’s a case that easily earns its place on this list. 

Read:Lian Li O11 Air Mini Review 

3. Fractal Design Meshify 2

Best Case for High-End Rigs and Workstations

Specifications

Type: Mid-Tower ATX

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX ( mm)

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (11) " (6 brackets included), (4) " (2 brackets included)

Included Fans: (3) mm

Reasons to buy

+Interior brilliance+Excellent cooling performance+Easy panel and dust filter removal

Reasons to avoid

-Overkill for modest builds-Slightly buzzy fan motors

Fractal offers a thoughtful, versatile design aimed at ease-of-use, and delivers a very pleasant and enjoyable building experience with the Meshify 2. Whether you use this case as a system where you just want to deliver tons of airflow and room for expansion, a workstation with tons of hard drives, a server, or high-end custom liquid cooling, the Meshify 2 will find a way to accommodate your build. For that, along with thermal and acoustic performance that is in-line with what we expect from a mesh front, it earns a rare five-star rating.

The Meshify 2 doesn’t try to reinvent the wheel when it comes to case design, instead gently chiseling away at it to refine the experience. There’s only one thing about it that you need to ask yourself before smashing the buy button: Will you really use the room for storage or cooling parts, or can you buy a smaller case and save yourself some space and money?

Read: Fractal Design Meshify 2 Review

4. Phanteks Eclipse PA

Best Budget ATX Gaming Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (2) ” (2) ”

Included Fans: (2) mm ARGB

Reasons to buy

+So much RGB+Includes well-featured standalone D-RGB controller+Chart-leading thermal performance+Excellent case for simple ATX systems+Just $66

Reasons to avoid

-Materials are kinda cheap-No real intake filtration

Phanteks’ PA comes in at a street price of just $66, and that isn’t much especially if you consider its feature set. Sure, it won’t blow you away with quality materials or extreme silence, but it comes with all the essentials needed for simple, budget-minded ATX gaming systems while still offering a fun bit of flair.

Behind the mesh front panel you’ll find two mm addressable-RGB fans, which provide the chassis with class-leading thermal performance at perfectly acceptable noise levels. This is a case that’s more than capable of dealing with today’s high-TDP GPUs, and a mm radiator mount at the top can be used with an AIO to keep your CPU cool too.

And as a cherry on top, Phanteks also throws in an addressable-RGB strip along the side of the chassis, along with an excellent software-free RGB controller, creating a very complete and easy to use ‘just throw parts at it’ package.

Read: Phanteks PA Review 

5. Lian Li Q58

Best Mini-ITX Case

Specifications

Type: ITX Case

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (1) ” (3) ”

Included Fans: None

Reasons to buy

+Tidy, chic looks+Great thermals+Easy to build in+Flexible build options+Great finish quality+Affordable at just $

Reasons to avoid

-Cable management is a bit tough-PCIe riser card needs additional support

Lian Li hasn’t been quiet about its upcoming case launches, but when it did finally launch the Q58, it blew us away. This is a liter Mini-ITX case that costs just $ in its base variant, and it packs great looks, excellent cooling potential, and a flexible internal design.

The basic frame is made from steel, and each side houses a half-glass, half -perforated steel. The front face and the top plate are made from fancier, prettier aluminum, giving the case a very premium feel overall. The GPU can draw fresh air straight from the side, but you can still see its pretty RGB through the glass, and you can squeeze a mm radiator into the case’s roof. 

But the case can also be reconfigured to sacrifice some AIO and storage options in favor of fitting an ATX power supply, which is a great way of achieving some cost savings in combination with opting for the plain PCIe riser cable. Throw another $30 in, and you can also get a version of this case with a PCIe riser cable, ready for RTX and RX (and future) graphics cards. There are few things not to like about the Q

Read:Lian Li Q58 Review 

6. Phanteks Evolv Shift 2

Best Mini-ITX Case Value

Specifications

Type: ITX Tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (1) " (2) "

Included Fans: (1) mm

Reasons to buy

+Beautiful glass & aluminum paneling+Small footprint+Straightforward interior layout+Fits big GPUs

Reasons to avoid

-Only fits mm AIOs for CPU cooling-Challenging build due to tight space-Riser cable only does PCIe  Wobbly switchgear at top

The Evolv Shift 2 stands out at first glance for its its towering, small footprint design and beautiful anodized aluminum panels. Priced at $ for the mesh version and $ for the variant with TG and an addressable-RGB fan, it easily earns a spot on our Best PC Cases list. 

With a small footprint and beautiful finish in both the tempered-glass and mesh variants, the Evolv Shift 2 is perfect as an SFF PC for use in the living room, moving around the house wherever you need it or taking to LAN parties. The easily accessible top IO makes plugging devices in a breeze too. Building in it was tight, and came with the typical frustrations associated with Mini-ITX systems, but I still managed a build within about 3 hours, and the end result was well worth the effort.

Read: Evolv Shift 2 Review 

7. Corsair Obsidian Series X RGB

Best Premium RGB ATX Gaming Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (2) ” (2) ”

Included Fans: (3) mm ARGB

Reasons to buy

+Clean aesthetics and refined interior+Good enough thermal performance+Mesh option (without RGB) for performance enthusiasts or budget builders+RGB variant includes iCUE hub+Relatively quiet

Reasons to avoid

-Only one front USB-A port-Fans don’t spin fast enough for extreme performance requirements

Corsair’s X RGB is a sleek gaming tower that comes with two glass panels and three RGB spinners. Priced at $ noq, it’s not cheap, but its design is thoroughly considered and as you build with it, it’s clear where Corsair’s gaming and PC building pedigree comes from. Indeed, the X RGB (as well as the similar D airflow), is an extremely easy and convenient chassis to build a system in, and everything just makes sense. 

While it won’t blow you away with premium materials such as aluminum, the dark tinted glass ensures that you only see RGB lighting inside the case, allowing you to be a little sloppy with cable management because you won’t see it anyway. Add to that Corsair’s class-leading RGB ecosystem, and you’ve got a very pretty case that’s convenient in use and always looks good, no matter what you install inside it.

Read: Corsair Obsidian Series X RGB Review 

8. Fractal Design Define 7

Best Case for Quiet High-End Rigs and Workstations

Specifications

Type: Mid-Tower ATX

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX

Card Length Supported: / inches ( / mm)

Storage Support: (7) ", (2) "

Included Fans: (3) mm, (3) mm

Reasons to buy

+Tempered-glass side panel+Filtration system+Good thermal performance+Low noise+Water cooling support+USB Gen 2 Type-C+Versatility

Reasons to avoid

-No RGB Lighting

A dual-layout (open or extra storage) interior, vented top panel, dedicated water cooling fill port under the top filter, and a Nexus+ 2 PWM fan hub add to the Define 7's extremely solid construction and top-notch fit/finish to make it a sure hit with performance enthusiasts. If you're looking for top notch performance with a strong feature set, the Fractal Design Define 7 is worth the money.

Read: Fractal Design Define 7 review

9. Antec P82 Silent

Best Budget Silent ATX Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)

Storage Support: (2) ” (2) ”

Included Fans: (3) 3x mm

Reasons to buy

+Includes 3 quality fans and fan controller+Excellent acoustic and good cooling performance

Reasons to avoid

-Fan controller switch feels sludgy-No top radiator mount

Antec’s P82 Silent takes case design in a slightly different direction than most ATX cases do these days, instead focusing on silence and understated looks. While this means that you won’t be able to mount an AIO at the top,thanks to the closed panel there for sound dampening, the P82 Silent is an excellent air-cooling case for systems that need to draw less attention.

Priced at $60, the build quality is in-line with what we'd expect featuring mostly painted steel and cheap plastics, but the case comes with three quiet fans and a fair amount of damping material to keep it all hush hush. 

With room for up to ATX motherboards, more than adequate cable management, and surprisingly good thermal performance despite the quiet intentions, the P82 Silent is a great value for those seeking a quiet PC.

Read:Antec P82 Silent review 

be quiet! Dark Base

Best XL/EATX Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower

Motherboard Support: E-ATX, ATX, Micro ATX, Mini ITX

Card Length Supported: mm ( inches)/mm ( inches with HD cage removed)

Storage Support: (7) , (9) "

Included Fans: (2) mm

Reasons to buy

+Good thermal performance+Great looking chassis+Embedded lighting+Tempered-glass side panel+Low noise+Excellent filtration system

Reasons to avoid

-Price-Only two mm fans (three would be ideal at this price)

The be quiet! Dark Base is in a class of its own. At first glance it may seem like just another case with a tempered-glass side panel. But upon further inspection, it’s clear how much time and effort went into the design. You'd be hard-pressed to find a more versatile, high-performance enclosure.

It’s clear that be quiet! put a great deal of thought into the design of this chassis’ filtration system. Every intake fan mounting location in the Dark Base is equipped with a washable nylon fan filter. Gaining access to filters requires removing the front panel, but even though the front and bottom filters are extremely long, maintenance and cleaning is a snap.

Read: be quiet! Dark Base review

Phanteks Enthoo Pro II

Best Dual-System Case

Specifications

Type: Full-Tower ATX

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX(2), Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX

Card Length Supported: inches ( mm)

Storage Support: (12) ", (11) "

Included Fans: None

Reasons to buy

+Excellent thermal performance and cable management+Flexible interior and lavish front I/O+Affordable for its size and features

Reasons to avoid

-Unnecessarily big-No fans included-Materials could be of higher quality

Phanteks’ Enthoo Pro II is a very unique chassi, offering the most seamless dual-system support we’ve ever seen. And its new fabric mesh front looks really great, especially when you get close to the case. 

Thermally and acoustically, the Enthoo Pro II also performs phenomenally well. Of course, the mesh does let more noise out than a closed-front case would, but if you’re careful in your component selection and only pick quiet parts, it should all remain very tolerable.

Read:Phanteks Enthoo Pro II review

Discounts on the Best PC Cases

Whether you're buying one of the best PC cases on our list above or a different product, you may find some savings by checking out the latest Corsair coupon codes,  Newegg promo codes or Micro Center coupon codes.

Sours: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-pc-cases,html
  1. Indian names boy
  2. 2009 lancer gts engine
  3. Columbus police dispatch
  4. Mach3 missing steps

No matter whether you treat your computer as the centerpiece of your home office or just stuff it under your desk, buying the right PC case matters.

At a minimum, you want to pick a PC case that’s the right size for your needs and has room for all your hardware and USB devices. But some PC cases offer much, much more. Spacious innards, lower temperatures, muffled sound, extensive water-cooling support, and fancy-schmancy tempered glass panels or RGB lighting are just the tip of the iceberg.

Here’s a guide to buying a PC case that’s perfect for you. This is just the first step in your DIY journey; be sure to check out PCWorld’s guide to building a PC, too, as well as our guide on setting up your PC’s fans for maximum system cooling.

Editor’s note: Last updated with our latest videos in the PC case news section, update information throughout, and changes to our recommended cases.

PC case news

Last year, pricing for cases have steadily slipped upwards in the wake of the United States’ tariffs on Chinese products, followed by high demand for computer parts during the global pandemic. While stock has stabilized since, prices on most cases continue to be higher on average.

Remember to check out our case tear-downs on PCWorld’s YouTube channel, such as on the Lian Li Air Mini and Azza Pyramid case.

Size matters for PC cases

Before anything else, decide what size case you need. There are three major case sizes: Full tower, mid-tower, and mini-ITX.

Full-tower and mid-tower cases both fit standard ATX motherboards—by far the most common motherboard size out there. Both can also fit smaller micro-ATX motherboards. Exact sizing varies from case to case, but most mid-towers run up to roughly 18 inches high and 8 or so inches wide. Mid-tower PCs are probably the most common form factor and have enough room to fit systems with a closed-loop CPU cooler, a couple of graphics cards, and a lot of storage.

dscThiago Trevisan/IDG

Full-tower cases are massive. They often measure more than 20 inches in height and are longer and deeper than mid-tower cases, which makes them ideal if you’re one of the rare people using a massive Extended-ATX motherboard. 

Also consider a full-tower case if you plan on loading up your rig with extensive (or custom) water-cooling, storage galore, or 3- and 4-way graphics card setups. Full-tower cases often support more fans and inch drive bays as well. And the extra elbow room sure is nice during building.

Mini-ITX cases are the polar opposite of full-tower PC cases, built for diminutive mini-ITX motherboards. Some of these can be wondrously small and even fit inside home theater cabinets, but the tight quarters can create compatibility issues with some hardware. Don’t expect to use liquid-cooling or a big honking CPU cooler in most mini-ITX cases. Some mini-ITX cases don’t support full-length graphics cards, either; confirm the maximum length before you buy. Finally, there isn’t much room for extra hardware in these space-constrained chassis, so you’ll be limited to fairly basic system configurations. They’re great for schlepping to LAN parties, though!

pThiago Trevisan/IDG

Sometimes you’ll see “mini-tower” cases, which slot between mini-ITX and mid-tower in size to accommodate micro-ATX motherboards. They’re rarer than the others.

Once you’ve decided how big of a PC case you need, the next step is figuring out your budget.

If you’re spending $50 or less, you’re probably going to wind up with a bare-bones, nondescript case with few extra features. Try to pick one that has two fans, one in the front of the case and another in the rear, for maximized air-flow, which helps cooling. You won’t always find the option in this price range, though.

Things open up in the $50 to $ish price range, which has seen a lot of advancement over the past few years. You’ll find a lot of variance in both design and construction in the midrange. As always, be sure to check measurements to ensure your desired PC case can fit all your hardware, and you’ll also want to keep an eye on extra features. They’re a lot more common in this price range, especially as you move up in cost.

pThiago Trevisan/IDG

Features purely come down to personal preference or specifics needed for your build. Some cases are built with more fans for higher performance; others focus on silent design. Some—most notably much of Corsair’s case lineup—even eliminate inch drive bays completely for better airflow. You’ll start to find water-cooling compatibility worked into some cases in this price range, along with better cable management details, tool-less design, and aesthetic niceties like RGB lighting or tempered-glass side panels. We’ll get into feature details shortly, but around $ is the sweet spot for price-to-performance when it comes to buying a PC case.

Once you extend beyond $ or so, you should expect a PC case that excels in both performance and acoustics, and one that comes with connectivity options and handy features galore. Some of them are huge; this is where you’ll find most full-tower cases. Build materials tend to be swankier in high-end cases, with aluminum and tempered glass being much more common than in budget and mid-range cases.

You’ll also find wild concept cases like the motorized, sadly discontinued In Win H-Tower, which opens like a flower. Caselabs are now bankrupt, but their cases remain legendary. And don’t forget cases (if we can call them that!) like the Lian Li DKF desk. 

Be mindful when you’re buying a PC case that doubles as a funky flagship, though. They oftentimes sacrifice functionality for their exotic forms.

PC case aesthetics 

Make sure you like the look of the PC case you’re buying! You’re going to be staring at it for years to come, so this is not a superficial consideration. Every online retailer shows PC cases from multiple angles on their store pages, so there’s no excuse for buying ugly.

PC cases come in all sorts of colors, materials, and designs. If you don’t want to spend time neatening up your interior cabling, pass on cases with a side window.

ryzen 3 gaming pc 97Brad Chacos/IDG

Buy a PC case: Features to watch for

Aside from the basic dimensions and price, feature support is the biggest differentiator when you’re buying a PC case. The more you spend on your case, the more goodies you’ll receive. Here’s a quick rundown of many of the features you’ll find in modern PC cases, starting with practical extras before delving into nice-to-haves.

Drive bays and SSD mounting points: With recent trends towards using NVMe SSDs, room for large physical drives are less necessary with modern cases. Many people still use traditional SATA-based SSDs or hard drives, though. If that’s part of your build, make sure a PC case has enough inch and inch drive bays to house your storage drives. Some cases include mounting points for SSD on the rear of the motherboard tray, too. And if you need a inch bay in the front of your PC to house an optical drive, fan controller, or whatever, confirm your case includes that. A number of cases have been ditching inch bays to improve airflow from the front-side fan(s)—most notably several Corsair cases.

hard drive toollessMarco Chiappetta/IDG

Tool-less design: In ye olden days, practically everything in a PC case required a Phillips screwdriver. No more. Tool-less design is nearly universal in mid-range and high-end cases, with thumb screws for internal fastening and twist-on, snap-on, or otherwise tool-free mechanisms in drive bays.

Cable management: Look for a case with cut-outs in the motherboard tray, which allow you to route your cabling through the rear of your case. Out of sight, out of mind. Budget PC cases tend to have simple giant holes punched in the motherboard tray, while mid-range options frequently include rubber grommets in the holes to tidy things up even more. Some cases include tie-off points or even wire covers behind the motherboard tray to keep your cabling clean.

CPU cooler cut-away: Speaking of the motherboard tray, some nicer PC cases include large cut-outs in the section behind your processor, which let you replace your PC’s CPU or CPU cooler without ripping out your entire motherboard. It’s not a feature you’re likely to need often, but if you do, it’s a godsend.

Front-panel connectivity: If you’ve got a lot of external devices, check out the front-panel connectivity of the PC case. Even cheap cases have a couple of USB-A Type ports in the front. Many modern cases include USB-A Type 3, USB-C, and even fan or RGB lighting controllers as table stakes. You’ll often find front-panel audio jacks as well, though we’d always recommend plugging your headset directly into the audio jack on your motherboard’s rear I/O shield.

dscBrad Chacos

Fans and airflow: The more fans you have in your PC, the better your airflow is likely to be. At the very least, you want two fans for optimal airflow—an intake in the front and an outward-blowing fan in the rear. Some budget PC cases include only a single fan, and your PC’s temperatures and performance will suffer for it. Even if they aren’t populated, many cases include additional fan mounts that allow you to upgrade your cooling later. As mentioned before, some cases are ditching inch drive bays to remove airflow obstructions for the front fans, though you obviously wouldn’t want a case like that if you needed one of those bays.

Also pay attention to what’s in front of those fans. Tempered glass and stoic metal front panels are all the rage these days, but those pretty designs can hinder airflow if they’re not designed properly. The Silverstone RL06 ($ on Amazon) and Fractal Design Meshify C ($90 on Amazon) skips those obstructions, placing protective mesh in front of several mm intake fans for superb airflow and thus, lower system temperatures than its rivals.

Dust filters: Keeping your PC clean is important. A computer clogged with dust and pet hair and tobacco gunk is a computer that runs hot and throttles more often. Dust filters keep most of that debris from ever reaching your fans, much less your precious internal hardware. But be sure to configure your fans for positive air pressure to keep dust from being sucked in through the unoccupied vents in your chassis.

Sound-dampening: Soundproof cases keep your rig running quiet, often by using sound-dampening materials inside the panels of your PC. Those materials keep noise in but also tend to impede airflow, so soundproof cases often hit somewhat higher temperatures than standard cases. Some nicer soundproof cases manage to stay silent while also optimizing for airflow by including large mm fans spinning at low (and hence quiet) speeds.

Water-cooling support: The rise of sealed all-in-one coolers have made liquid-cooling more popular than ever. If you plan to water-cool your PC, pay fine attention to the support provided by your case. You probably won’t be able to use liquid-cooling whatsoever in most mini-ITX cases, and many mid-tower cases only support up to mm radiators—and placement of that liquid-cooling radiator may be limited to only the top or bottom of the case, depending on the case’s dimensions.

If you want a beefy mm radiator, you’ll often need to step up to a full tower case, though unusually large mid-towers can sometimes squeeze them in as well. Some pricier cases also have large swatches of interior space dedicated to liquid-cooling reservoirs for custom loops.

Tempered-glass panels: Many newer PC cases include panels consisting entirely of tempered glass, presenting an unfettered look at your PC’s inner hardware, albeit at the cost of air flow. It’s gorgeous, but brittle—handle with care! You’ll start to find tempered-glass options around the $70 range, though they’re more common around $

PAX Hardware - RazerIDG / Hayden Dingman

Integrated lighting: Customizable RGB lighting is a big craze in recent years, and that includes PC cases. You either love RGB or you hate RGB. Either way, it’s easy to find cases that meet your aesthetic tastes. You can even watch us build an RGB PC—that was fun!

Vertical GPU mount: Many cases now include the option to have a vertical GPU mount that displays your graphics card. Do note that you may need a special bracket that can vary by case, and a high-quality PCIe riser cable. Some PCIe graphics cards will require appropriate cables to work with the newest GPUs as well.

Our favorite PC cases

We don’t do many formal PC case reviews at PCWorld, but we’re constantly building PCs in all sorts of rigs. Here are some of our favorites in each price point. (Note that the U.S. tariffs on Chinese products have resulted in price increases of about $10 to $25 per case.)

Best budget PC cases

  • Corsair D Airflow: Coming in at under $, this is a very well-rounded case. It looks great aesthetically, while offering good cooling performance. You can also swap out the front panel with glass if desired.
  • Lian Li Lancool II Mesh: As an alternative, this also provides fantastic airflow with an attractive design.
pThiago Trevisan/IDG
  • Cooler Master NRP: Mini-ITX? Check. Great airflow? Check. Flexible build options? Check. Great price? Yep! One of the best mini-ITX cases you can buy.

Best mid-range PC cases

  • Lian Li Dynamic: The fan favorite. Beautiful aesthetics, flexible hardware support, and only $
  • Be quiet! Silent Base Quiet performance, refined build quality, understated aesthetics. It also comes with excellent Pure Wing 2 fans.
pThiago Trevisan/IDG
  • Maingear Vybe: Want an affordable mid-tower that has water cooling in mind? This case is built for that, with an RGB controller and smart Apex distribution plate mounting.

Best high-end PC cases

3k8aThiago Trevisan/IDG
  • Fractal Design Define 7 XL: Big and filled to the brim with options that will make any PC builder smile. Also check out Fractal’s Meshify series if you’d like more airflow.
  • Lian Li DKF: Yep, it’s a desk which doubles as a PC! There’s an even larger version that can fit two motherboards, the DK Features include automatic height adjustment, opaque glass that reveals your hardware at the touch of a button, and, you know, the fact that’s it’s both a desk and PC case. Very expensive but very unique.
Sours: https://www.pcworld.com/article//how-to-buy-pc-case.html

The best mid-tower cases in

The best mid-tower cases will be the supreme seat for your dream gaming PC build. It may not be a practical moment in time to secure one of the best graphics cards, but at least the choosing the right chassis will mean, once stock comes in, you can happily orchestrate all but the absolute pinnacle of system builds.

If you're looking to make a statement best full tower cases will offer space for a truly monumental, money-no-object build. Otherwise, a mid-tower case will give you a good starting point. Whether you're pulling together a whole new PC, or just jamming in some upgrades, these mid-tower cases will offer plenty of space. It's only once you get down to the best Mini-ITX cases that things really start to get tricky.

There are a couple of things to look out for when searching for the best mid-tower PC case: you want ease of access to your components, good fan and radiator support as well as airflow, and quality materials used throughout. Oh, and you also want it to look badass.

It's vital to get the case right—especially if you've spent a ton of money on your new graphics card—so we've checked a bunch of mid-tower cases and whittled them down to the most workable, high quality ones. After a few rounds of pulling components out and jamming them back in to new cases, here are those we found to be the best.

Best mid-tower cases

Image 1 of 4
Image 2 of 4
Image 3 of 4
Image 4 of 4

1. NZXT Hi

The best mid-tower PC case

Specifications

Form Factor: Mid tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, MicroATX, ATX and EATX(Up to mm or inches)

Dimensions: x x mm

Weight: kg

Radiator Support: Front: 2x mm or 3x mm with Push/Pull, Top: 2x mm or 3 x mm, Rear: 1x mm or 1x mm

I/O Ports: 2x USB Type-A Gen 1, 1 x USB Type-C Gen 2, 1 x Audio/Mic

Drive Bays: 7x inch, 4x inch

Reasons to buy

+Integrated addressable LED lighting+CAM powered "smart device"+Vertical GPU mount

Reasons to avoid

-Smart device not always required

This most recent iteration of NZXT's "smart" chassis brings a couple of new features to help modernize your build. This ultra-clean and uncomplicated mid-tower case emphasizes convenience above all. It includes many of the same trappings as its predecessor, but costs a little bit more and has just a couple of neat changes. The NZXT Hi features a front panel USB Type-C port and the ability to vertical mount your GPU with a separate PCIe riser.

The Hi features integrated RGB lighting around the tempered glass side panel, controlled by the NZXT CAM software and a built-in LED lighting hub that allows for easy control of RGB lighting and fan speeds as well. To keep things cool, the Hi features ventilation gutters that run the perimeter of each side of the case, aided by the four mm fans included with the case.

Cable routing is where the Hi shines—achieved primarily through a large aluminum slat that allows you to route your cables into the integrated cable channels on the back of the case. This case keeps everything clean and clutter-free, and the velcro straps built into the back help hold everything down. An excellent, and easy alternative to the rubber gasket solution found on some of the best mid-towers.

Image 1 of 6
Image 2 of 6
Image 3 of 6
Image 4 of 6
Image 5 of 6
Image 6 of 6

2. Corsair Airflow D

The best mid-tower case for airflow at a great price

Specifications

Form Factor: Mid-tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX

Dimensions: x x mm

Weight: kg

Radiator Support: mm, mm, mm, mm, mm

I/O Ports: 1x USB Type-C, 1x USB , 1x Audio/Mic

Drive Bays: 2x inch, 2x inch

Reasons to buy

+Great airflow and good looks+Straightforward to build in +Surprisingly affordable

Reasons to avoid

-Little tight for top-mounted radiators

Corsair has made some great chassis over the years, but the look of some of them were starting to take precedence over functionality. That changed with the release of the D Airflow, which shows that the two schools can be combined for a great-looking case that also offers great airflow. The ventilated front panel means the fans can run slower and quieter while offering the same level of cooling over closed off cases. 

Building a system inside the D Airflow is straightforward, with plenty of room where you need it most. The channel in front of and behind the motherboard tray makes routing your main cables that much easier, and there's enough space here for a variety of radiators and cooling setups—you can fit up to a mm radiator in the front and mm radiator in the roof. Although the latter can be tight against the top of the motherboard, it's still possible. 

You'll find easy-to-remove dust filters on the top, front, and below the PSU for easy cleaning. Popping off the front panel is simple too, which makes installing fans or a radiator that much easier. Overall, it's a reassuring return to form for Corsair. When you consider that all of this can be picked up for well under $, it's hard to not be impressed by the overall package. It makes for a great home for anything from a simple mid-range build to a high-end powerhouse, and we've used it as the basis for our own mainstream PC Gamer test rig. 

Image 1 of 3
Image 2 of 3
Image 3 of 3

3. Cooler Master SLM

The best high-end mid-tower

Specifications

Form Factor: Mid-tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX (support upto 12" x ")

Dimensions: x x mm

Weight: kg

Radiator Support: mm, mm, mm, mm, mm

I/O Ports: 1x USB Type-C, 2x USB , 2x USB , 1x Audio/Mic

Drive Bays: 8x inch, 4x inch

Reasons to buy

+Sand-blasted aluminum finish+Excellent GPU cooling+Decent noise reduction

Reasons to avoid

-Higher CPU temperatures

The MasterCase SLM has to be one of Cooler Master's most beautifully designed cases. It features anodized aluminum with a sand-blasted finish and just enough attitude to make it look sleek, futuristic, and elegant, all at once. We were even more impressed once we opened it up to build in it. 

The CM SLM is the first case we've tested with a vertical chimney design for its cooling that just makes sense and works. Cooler Master went all-in with the SLM, completely sealing the front and moving the entire PSU shroud and housing from the bottom to the front of the case. All of that newly opened space combined with generous feet allow the case to funnel the airflow directly onto the GPU.

While the CPU temperatures do suffer slightly from this design, the SLM has the lowest GPU temperatures out of every mid-tower we've tested. Mount the graphics card vertically and away from the glass with the rotatable PCI bracket, and cooling improves even further. While the case features all of the connectivity and convenience you'd expect in a high-end mid-tower, it is, unfortunately, missing an included GPU riser cable.

Read our full Cooler Master MasterCase SLM review.

Image 1 of 4
Image 2 of 4
Image 3 of 4
Image 4 of 4

4. Cooler Master HM

The best mid-tower for bigger builds

Specifications

Form Factor: Mid-tower

Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX (support upto 12" x ")

Dimensions: x x mm

Weight: kg

Radiator Support: mm, mm, mm, mm, mm

I/O Ports: 1x USB Type-C, 2x USB , 1x Audio/Mic

Drive Bays: 3x inch, 2x inch

Reasons to buy

+It's massive (supports E-ATX)+High airflow with 2x mm RGB fans

Reasons to avoid

-Style is hit or miss

Cooler Master's HM is the company's latest flagship mid-tower, but we'd rather it be called a full-sized tower. Measuring x x inches, the HM is one of the biggest mid-towers on this list. Thanks to its large size and internal layout, it's straightforward to build in and supports a huge variety of components and custom cooling options.

The HM comes with two massive mm RGB LED fans installed, which do a fantastic job of increasing airflow out of the box. Other modern touches include a USB Type-C connector and tons of modularity, including the option to choose between a mesh or tempered glass front panel.

Our only major issue with the case is the lack of easily removable magnetic dust filters for the front fan intake. Luckily, all of the mesh in the entire H line features a secondary filter layer that'll help keep dust out of your build. We mention the dust because the HM features some serious airflow and comes prepared to keep the beefiest of gaming PCs cool.

Best mini-ITX case | Best full tower case | Best CPU cooler | Best DDR4 RAM | Best gaming monitor| Best gaming headset

Image 1 of 4
Image 2 of 4
Image 3 of 4
Image 4 of 4

5. Lian-Li PC Dynamic

The best mid-range mid-tower

Specifications

Form Factor: Mid-tower

Motherboard Support: E-ATX, ATX, M-ATX, mini-ITX

Dimensions: x x mm

Weight: kg

Radiator Support: mm, mm, mm, mm

I/O Ports: 2x USB , 2x HD audio, 1x USB Type-C

Drive Bays: 6x inch, 3x inch

Reasons to buy

+Synapse 3-compatible RGB lighting+Plenty of headroom for upgrades

Reasons to avoid

-Sharp around the edges

If you're strapped for vertical space, the Lian-Li PC Dynamic is a short and stubby alternative to some of the more long-necked PC cases we've seen. Although it doesn't come with the most precise instructions given its proprietary lighting tech, it is one of two Razer-designed PC cases in existence. And of the two, this one is the best. 

Featuring a tempered glass design, installing components in the PC is painless. Well, apart from some of the super-sharp angles that might spike the odd finger. You can remove the top and both sides of the chassis for easy access into its internals. Parts of the process that used to be stressful, such as liquid cooler installations, are now stumbling blocks of a bygone era.

Plus, if you're willing to shell out a bit more cash over the vanilla model, the PC comes in a Razer Edition as well. Fully integrated with the San Franciscan company's Synapse 3 lighting software, you can even coordinate it with your other Razer-made peripherals. 

Best mid-tower cases FAQ

Is a mid-tower case big enough?

Generally speaking, a mid-tower PC case will house all but the most extreme of system builds. If you're trying to cram in discrete water cooling loops for both your graphics card and high-end CPU, then you might find things are a bit too cramped inside. But for most high-end gaming PCs a mid-tower case will be plenty big enough for your needs.

The thing to keep in mind when looking at the dimensions of a prospective chassis is the length of graphics card you want to put inside, and where you might be mounting any water cooling radiators you might want. If those are going in the front, be aware that will cut down on the space you have for a GPU.

How much should I spend on a mid-tower case?

If you want to spend less than $50 on a new chassis you have to be willing to forgo such luxuries as easily accessible dust vents, different front panel connections, or high-end airflow. But things open up once you move into the $50 - $ region. Once of our favorites, the Corsair D Airflow can be picked up for less than $90 and provides all the extras you could want from a top PC case.

Are bigger cases better?

It is possible that a larger case can offer greater cooling, particularly with the potential for more airflow around the main heat generating parts of the PC, such as the CPU and graphics card. But without sufficient fans creating that airflow, and without them being properly positioned, a bigger case can still lead to heat build up.

The main benefit from bigger cases is that they're easier to build into and simpler to upgrade later on down the line.

Dave has been gaming since the days of Zaxxon and Lady Bug on the Colecovision, and code books for the Commodore Vic 20 (Death Race !). He built his first gaming PC at the tender age of 16, and finally finished bug-fixing the Cyrix-based system around a year later. When he dropped it out of the window. He first started writing for Official PlayStation Magazine and Xbox World many decades ago, then moved onto PC Format full-time, then PC Gamer, TechRadar, and T3 among others. Now he's back, writing about the nightmarish graphics card market, CPUs with more cores than sense, gaming laptops hotter than the sun, and SSDs more capacious than a Cybertruck.

Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/best-mid-tower-case/

Corsair best case buy

Corsair Computer Cases

Corsair computer cases come with multiple internal fans and designs that allow direct airflow to your computer's graphics processing unit (GPU). USB ports support high-speed data transfer with flash drives. Cable routing channels, available in some Corsair carbide cases, keep components inside each case tidy. Some cases are spacious enough to fit multiple systems. Tempered glass cases have built-in red, green and blue (RGB) lighting controllers and tempered glass panels that display and illuminate components in multiple colors. Removable trays allow for easy and quick installation. With their simple layouts and minimalist builds, mid-tower cases are easily customizable. Full-length power supply unit (PSUs) covers hide PSUs and cables, protecting them from mechanical damage.

Corsair Computer Cases Are Customizable

Some Corsair computer cases have four hard drive trays that provide solid-state drive support, allowing you to mix and match to fit your needs. Dual USB front panel ports give you quick-and-easy access to the latest high-speed portable hard and flash drives. Most Corsair carbide cases consist of five internal fans that support customizable cooling. Spacious internal assemblies draw airflow directly to the GPU, ensuring graphic cards are cool during intense gaming sessions. Cable-routing channels let you easily manage your cables. Side panels attached with thumbscrews are easy for you to open.

Obsidian Glass Cases Can Accommodate Multiple Systems

Corsair obsidian glass cases can fit both a complete E-ATX (Extended ATX) and mini-ITX (Information Technology eXtended) system so you can stream and game smoothly from one enclosure. CORSAIR iCUE software supports system control in a single interface. With durable media center cases, you can enjoy years of protection. French-door style rear storage compartments and dual-purpose motherboard trays make cleaning effortless. RGB LED-lit front panels with USB and Type-C ports support future proof and backward compatible connectivity. Install fans and radiators effortlessly with smooth, tool-less modular radiator mounting trays.

Tempered Glass Cases Support Multiple Drives

Corsair tempered glass cases have flexible storage options that support up to four drives. Cooling fans and multiple radiators keep your PC cool. Integrated RGB lighting controllers mean you can change fan color modes at the touch of a button. F">gaming cases include removable dust filters to keep your system clean. Upfront connections include I/O panels and different ports that provide easy access to other devices. Tempered glass panels on four sides display every component. Cable routing channels simplify cable management. Removable trays in the front and top of the chassis make installing new case accessories quick and easy.

Micro ATX Cases Are Compact and Portable

With high-density sound dampening panels, Corsair mid-tower cases reduce noise, creating a comfortable working environment. Removable cages and optical disc drive (ODD) bays provide flexible storage. Simple and intuitive internal layouts enable easy and quick building. Most Corsair micro ATX cases have minimalist designs, ensuring that your system can fit in almost any environment. Their compact designs make them easily portable.

Sours: https://www.newegg.com/Corsair-Computer-Cases/BrandSubCat/ID
Best PC Cases of 2021 So Far: $60 to $200 Airflow, Silence, \u0026 Budget Cases

Taking out a napkin, presses it to her pussy. puts on panties and quickly gathers. - At the weekend, I don't want to make any plans.

You will also be interested:

He obeyed and lay down. Somehow he is not at ease. We must cheer him up, caress him.



492 493 494 495 496