Wood carving santa face

Wood carving santa face DEFAULT

Carving out a niche in Santa's workshop

Goody's Decoys, the name on a shop on Elkridge's Main Street, disguises what really goes on inside.

Seated at a workbench is a jolly man with a silvery white beard and a round belly. Late into the night, he wields a blade on a piece of wood, shavings flying, trying to find the Santa Claus inside.

It's always Christmas in Harold Goodman's woodshop, where he spends hours creating hand-carved Kriss Kringles.

The business began almost 20 years ago during Hurricane Gloria, when a friend gave him his first knife and a block of wood.

Goodman started out carving decoys, forming the bodies of ducks from sheets of cork. After winning several awards and exhibiting his work at decoy shows and arts festivals, Anna Goodman saw a wooden Santa Claus and asked him to make one for her.

"After the in-laws and outlaws seen hers, they wanted one," he said. He started bringing his Santas to shows and said he sells to each year.

Goodman, 48, said he carves every day to keep up with the demand.

"Every one I sell, I usually get a new customer from that," he said.

He comes to the shop from his Lansdowne home each night and often works during breaks from his full-time job as an industrial electrician. He always keeps a whittler - a knife with two small woodcutting blades - in his pocket, and he orders a dozen craft knives to get him through the year.

Made to order

Goodman carves variations of his Kriss Kringles with their heavy brows and beards, including a hooded St. Nicholas wearing a cloak and carrying a tree, fish or rifle and one with Santa in suspenders. A Santa with a crab and crab net is named "Santa Claws."

He avoids carving eyeballs, which he said "lock" an expression on the Santa's face. One person who sees a Kriss Kringle describes its face as cute; the next might interpret the expression as stern.

"If I don't carve an eye, people imagine the rest," Goodman said.

The figures range in size and price - smaller, 4- to 5-inch Father Christmases begin at $ The largest are about 2 feet tall and cost more than $, although he has made 4-foot-tall Santas for custom orders. But Goodman said his customers prefer St. Nicks of a more manageable size.

"If it's bigger than a dinner plate, it's hard to display," Goodman said.

Each is made from pine, basswood or mahogany. Goodman gets 5-byfoot logs from an Amish lumber mill in Pennsylvania or end cuts from a log cabin manufacturer.

He sells many at Vincenti Decoys in Havre de Grace, where he holds Christmastime demonstrations as part of the Candlelight Tour.

Last year, collectors lined up at Vincenti Decoys before it opened, waiting for the Goodmans to unpack their stock, co-owner Jeannie Vincenti said.

Looking the part

It helps that the carver looks the part.

Vincenti described Goodman as being "as tall as he is round." He stops cutting his silvery-gray beard in June so it will be long and full by December, and for the tour he wears a burgundy cloak with cream faux fur trim that Anna Goodman, a former seamstress, sewed for him.

After each carving is done, Anna Goodman paints it. Finally, her husband treats each with a mix that he calls "secret sauce" and finishes with three coats of bowling alley wax.

When he teaches carving classes, students are often awed by the transformation from a piece of wood into Father Christmas, Goodman said.

"When you first pick up a piece of wood, it's an 'it,"' he said. "When you're finished , it's a 'him.' As you're finding that Santa in there, it gains personality and becomes a 'him.'"

Sours: https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpmstory.html
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Sours: https://shefalitayal.com/carving-santa-faces.html
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Introduction

I look at whittling as flat plane carving. The most popular results are seen as folk art with carving styles varying from region to region(French Canadian, Ozark, Scandinavian)

All you need is a knife and imagination and you are on your way.

Choosing a whittling project is a good place for anyone interested in woodcarving to start. The only tool you need is a knife and you learn the three basic cuts, the stop cut, push cut and the pull cut. The three cuts are used by all carvers in their projects. Learning the basic steps well and repetition of them is the best way in becoming proficient for future projects.

While applying the three basic cuts over and over again to shape your project it is important to “stop and strop”  the knife.

The importance in keeping a sharp edge on your knife cannot be stressed enough. When buying tools, it is best if you select the best tools you can afford and make sure they come not only sharpened but honed as well.

Get in the habit to “stop and strop” your knife every half hour. It gives you a break from the project.

In keeping a sharp edge on your tools is an important part to enjoying woodcarving and more importantly not hurting yourself.

Safety

Always maintain a clean, clear, work area that is well lit. If you are limited to carving in the kitchen or dinning room make a small carving board or use a thick mat(Olfa product) to protect the table surface 

Wear hand protection. A kevlar glove, thumb guard or tape will save you from cuts and kicks. 

Never carve if you are tired or on medication that may affect your vision and coordination. Remember, woodcarving requires total focus and concentration.

Materials

7/8&#;x7/8&#;x/2&#; basswood block

black stove wire

acrylic paints

Tools

Detail knife

5/64 drill

protective glove

pencil

Posted in Santa Ornament  |  Tags: Christmas, Santa, Santa Ornament, Wood Carving, woodcarving  | 

Sours: https://woodcarvingwithbrian.com/category/santa-ornament/

Carving a Simple Santa Ornament

Simple project is perfect for teaching beginners or just fun for yourself!

By Bob Kozakiewicz

 

You’ll need just a carving knife and a small V-tool to carve this easy St. Nick project. Because it uses only a few basic straight cuts, this piece is perfect for teaching new carvers. They will walk away with their own Santa (and a new love of carving!) in a couple of hours.

Getting Started

Refer to the attached drawings to measure and mark the blank. Connect the marks as shown in the drawings.


CLICK HERE to download the drawings for this project.


 

Step 1: Make stop cuts along the top and bottom of the hat trim. Work around the front right and front left sides of the trim. Then, make a stop cut around the nose. Carve up to the stop cuts
Step 2: Round the left and right corners of the hat trim. Start slimming down the hat.
Step 3: Reconnect the pencil lines that you carved off around the hat trim. Make new stop cuts along these lines, and then carve up and down to them on the back right and left sides. Round the back of the hat trim to help round the head.
Step 4: Round the top and bottom edges of the hat trim. Finish rounding the hat and nose.
Step 5: Make stop cuts along the outer edges of the beard. Follow the lines.
Step 6: Carve both shoulders down slightly below the beard where they meet the hat. Make stop cuts under the forearms and carve up to them. Round all four corners of the robe.
Step 7: Make stop cuts along the upper forearms. Carve down the beard area between the arms. Use the reference photos to draw the mouth, mustache, gloves, the area where the inner and outer robes meet, and the backs of the arms.
Step 8: Make stop cuts on the lines you drew in Step 7. Carve to the stop cuts to outline the the mouth, mustache, gloves,and backs of the arms. Carve towards the stop cuts on the robes from the inner robe towards the outer robe. Make a small V-cut at the inner elbows on both arms where the upper and lower arms meet. Round the sharp edges.
Step 9: Add the beard and mustache texture. Use a 1/8&#; (3mm) V-tool.

 

Painting the Santa

Paint the lighter colors before you do the darker colors. I painted this piece with acrylic paints thinned with water to the consistency of milk. Paint several layers if you want deeper colors. When the paint is dry, seal the carving with a coat of Deft semi-gloss spray lacquer. Spray combustible finishes, such as spray lacquer, outside where there is plenty of ventilation.

 


Materials:
• Basswood, 1&#; (cm) square: 6&#; (cm)
• Acrylic paint: red, white, black, green, medium flesh, parchment
• Finish, semi-gloss spray lacquer, such as Deft

Tools:
• Carving knife
• V-tool: 1/8&#; (3mm)
• Toothpick
• Paintbrushes
• Pencil
• Ruler


 

 

About the Author
Bob Kozakiewicz lives in Ridgewood, N.J., with Pat, his wife of 41 years. A self-taught carver, Bob has been carving since he was a teenager. He has won several ribbons for his work at woodcarving competitions. Find Bob on Facebook at www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9, e-mail him at [email protected], or view his Etsy shop RWKWoodcarving.


 

 

CLICK HERE to subscribe to Woodcarving Illustrated magazine

CLICK HERE to subscribe to Strop Talk, Woodcarving Illustrated’s eNewsletter

CLICK HERE for more Holiday themed projects.


 

Sours: http://woodcarvingillustrated.com/blog//12/15/carving-simple-santa-ornament/

Santa face carving wood

Learn to Carve with Harold Enlow’s Study Sticks

Enlow’s carving style is fun and whimsical with plenty of expressive looks and poses that always tell a story. 

Examples include Ozark Flossing, a barefoot fellow wearing overalls with a furry critter popping out of his rugged stovepipe hat, as he takes a piece of string between his toes and seems to laugh through imperfect teeth as if maybe it tickles a bit. 

The Fisherman depicts a gentleman who appears to have fallen on hard times, as his once-nice dress shoes are now exposing his toes and his yellow tie, holey pants and button-down shirt are crumpled and patched. His stubbly beard frames a satisfied look on his face as he chews on a cigar stump, and his “fishing pole” holds a hot dog that’s perhaps fresh off the campfire. 

Finally, this close-up of The Cowboy shows how Enlow’s attention to fine details makes his carvings so intriguing. The slightly askew bandana, the bent cigarette hanging precariously out of the side of his mouth, the ruddy complexion and steely gaze all combine to create a gruff looking character with attitude straight out of a Western movie. Enlow adds so many fun details into his carvings that one can discover something new and amusing with each fresh look.

Sours: https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/harold-enlow-study-sticks
Carving a simple Santa Claus face

carving of santa claus

Like many of you, I have always loved Santa and the spirit of good cheer that he represents. That, perhaps, is why I love to carve Santas so much. I share this Santa with you in the hope that this project rekindles the spirit of Christmas and holiday goodwill in each of you. The Santa in this project is a posed Santa. He is about to deliver the large present on which he is standing. I wonder who caught him on camera. I wonder what is in the present.

For this project, I used a 4" x /2" x 12" block of basswood .

For the most part, I carved this project using large two-handed tools for the roughing work and palm tools for the details. You can use tools that you have available, but most of the time I will indicate the tools that I used for the given step. I held this Santa in a vise, which allowed me to use both hands to control the tools.

Using carbon or transfer paper underneath the pattern, trace the profile of Santa onto the basswood, and then carefully cut out the pattern on a bandsaw.

Begin roughing out the basic form. The darkened areas on the project indicate excess wood that needs to be carved away.

5.Use a bench knife to create a stop cut along the right arm and sleeve. Use a #mm gouge to remove the wood up to the stop cut.

6.Using a #mm gouge, remove excess wood from the hat and pompom area to taper the back of the hat.

7.After removing the wood from the darkened areas to expose the arms and foot, use a marking pen to draw in the beard. The beard is very long and sweeps down and around the left side of Santa.

Use an 8mm V-tool (or something comparable) to outline the upper right arm and the lower right arm/ sleeve area. Repeat this step a few times with the V-tool to establish a good stop cut and further define the arm and sleeve. Repeat this step on his left arm and sleeve. Continue to use this V-tool to begin to separate Santa from the present that he is standing on. Use the V-tool to establish an outline separating the hat from the trim and the pom-pom on the back of the hat. Also outline Santa's beard, and the hairline on the sides of his face as well as over his shoulders.

Use a #mm gouge to remove excess wood from the beard and to expose his right arm.

Put a stop cut with your bench knife at the temple area of the face (both sides), and then use a large #mm gouge to establish the facial planes of Santa.

The darkened area shows the amount of wood that we want to remove to narrow Santa's head.

Continue using the #mm gouge to narrow Santa's face. Use the V-tool alongside Santa’s face where the hair flows down the sides of his head. Narrow the face so that when looking directly at Santa from a front view, you can see the hair standing out on both sides of the head framing his face.

Knock off the corners of the hat and begin to round the hat.

Create a stop cut at the top of the pom-pom and carve down to the pom-pom from all sides of the hat.

Use a bench knife to create a stop cut at the corners where the back of Santa's robe comes in contact with the present on which he is standing.

After creating a stop cut at the bottom of Santa's left mitten, at the bottom edge of his flowing beard, at the bottom of Santa’s robe all around the figure, and below the right sleeve, use the #mm gouge to begin to round and shape the figure. Where possible, carve from the bottom of the robe up the figure to the beard. Be sure that you remove enough wood from below the beard to have a thickness of mass to shape later.

Carefully place a stop cut alongside the inside of Santa’s right sleeve and alongside the beard where it intersects with the sleeve. Slide the tip of your bench knife into the tight corner at a shallow angle to remove the excess wood between the sleeve and beard.

Carve off the corners of Santa's hair, and begin to shape the hair to the general contour of the body and hat with the #mm gouge.

Because I tend to like a carving that shows the tool marks/ facets, especially after it has been painted and drybrushed, I use a #5 palm gouge to shape the hat and body. Continue to use a bench knife to shape the pom-pom as you shape Santa’s hat. (Note: Don't make the taper to the pom-pom too narrow prior to shaping the pom-pom, as it could break off.)

Use a wide #mm gouge to begin to shape the beard. You can also use the #mm or a shallow sweep #3 palm gouge if you prefer.

Use a 7/32" drill bit and drill a hole straight down through the top of the right mitten to accommodate the walking stick to be carved later. Use your bench knife to put a stop cut on each arm where Santa's mitten meets the sleeve; then use your bench knife to remove wood from the mitten/wrist area to distinguish the mitten from the sleeve.

Use your #5 palm gouge to shape the sleeves.

Sketch in thumb and hand lines on both mittens. Draw the thumb on the top inside of the mitten to just come up next to the hole that has been drilled down through the mitten.

Use your bench knife to establish a stop cut alongside the thumb; then use a medium 5mm V-tool to outline the thumb and the folded hand area. Shape the hand using your bench knife.

Use the #mm gouge to establish stop cuts alongside the nose as well as the brow ridge. (Note: Be sure to angle the stop cuts on each side of the nose so that the planes of the nose flow out onto each cheek. Also be sure to have the stop cuts establishing the brow ridge flow down at an angle onto the face.)

Use a #3 palm gouge to further define the nose.

Use a #5 palm gouge to establish the nasal wings.

Using a #mm gouge, start at about a third of the way from the top of the nose to carve a trough to just beyond the brow ridge line up onto the forehead. This will help to establish and define the brow area over each eye. Use a bent knife to smooth out the nose where the trough area was created.

Draw in cheek lines. (Note: I find it helpful to turn the piece upside down to make sure that these arcs are symmetrical.)

Using the tip of your bench knife, place a stop cut alongside the top of the nasal wing where the cheek arc line comes in contact with the nose. Also place a stop cut where each arc line meets the hairline. Then, using a 5mm palm gouge, establish a stop cut along the arc line. Use a #mm gouge to remove wood below the cheek lines to create cheek mass.

With a pencil, draw the mustache and lower lip. Then, using your bench knife, plunge-cut at an angle inward from both inside edges of the mustache and at the top of the lower lip to create a chip cut and establish his mouth.

Draw in Santa's eyes, using the bottom of each brow ridge to form the top of each eye.

With the tip of your detail knife, establish a stop cut at the corner of each side of both eyes. Lay your knife fairly flat and slide the point into each corner of the eye to begin to create curvature to the eye. Using the tip of your detail knife, place a stop cut along the entire curvature of the eye. (Note: Be sure to make your stop cuts as vertical as possible to the eye surface to avoid the risk of undercutting the eye and causing it to pop out.) Again, laying your knife at a very shallow angle to the eye, remove a thin amount of material from the top and the bottom of each eye.

Draw in upper and lower lid lines, and using a 1 /8" palm V-tool, carefully establish the upper and lower lids and crow’s-feet.

Add eyebrows using a 1 /8" V-tool.

Use a larger 8mm V-tool to create flow in the beard and hair. Using a larger V-tool to create separations in hair and beard mass makes the carving more interesting. Also carve hair texture lines that flow with the direction of the beard or hair. Try to create open "$" texture cuts with the V-tool, which makes the carving more dynamic.

Using the tip of your bench knife, place a stop cut at the bottom of the mitten where it meets the sleeve. Make the stop cut parallel to the mitten into the sleeve. Then, using a #mm gouge at the bottom of the sleeve, carve up to the mitten, hollowing out the sleeve.

Using a pencil, draw in the fur trim line at the bottom of Santa's robe, and then use a 5mm degree V-tool to carve the trim line.

Using the #mm veiner, texture the trim on the hat, the pom-pom, and the trim along the bottom of Santa's robe.

Carefully slide the tip of your bench knife along the face into the front base of each nasal wing to establish a stop cut; then use a #mm to establish both nostrils.

Use a 3mm V-tool to create a sole on Santa’s exposed boot.

Create the part in Santa’s robe with a 5mm V-tool.

Draw ribbon lines on the present, and then use your 5mm V-tool to carve along the ribbon lines and to define them. Carefully use a very shallow sweep gouge, like a #3 gouge, to remove wood along the present up to the ribbon. With your bench knife, whittle the staff to be placed in Santa's hand.

Painting Tips: Use good-quality acrylics to paint Santa (I usually thin the paints with a few drops of water), and be careful and take your time. Remember: A good painting job can enhance a carving, but if the painting is rushed or doesn't look good, it can detract from a good carving.

Drybrushing: After the paint has dried, I dip the tip of a dry, soft, wide brush into undiluted paint (Soldier Gray) and then wipe it off on a paper towel. I lightly brush it back and forth over the entire carving to enhance the tool marks and to add depth to the piece. Repeat as many times as desired.

Sours: http://www.carvingmagazine.com/wood-carving/projects/carving-santta-claus

Now discussing:

And here I am at home. Calling. Opens. Before me stood my Alenka. In a long robe with a belt under the chest.



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