Rare translate to spanish

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redes asociadas de investigación europea

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(notificada especialmente en pacientes diabéticos)

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raras frecuencia no conocida

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raro (calificador)

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raros poco frecuentes na

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Sours: https://mymemory.translated.net/en/English/Spanish/rare

Lost in Translation: 9 Truly Unique Spanish Words

Flamenco dancer | © 691806/Pixabay

Flamenco dancer | © 691806/Pixabay

Ever tried to describe something you just couldn’t find the right word for? Well, it may be the case you could have found the right word if you were speaking Spanish. These imaginative Spanish words have no direct equivalent in English – capturing something that seems truly unique in the Spanish language.

When the meal is finished, but the conversation is still flowing, stories are told, arguments resolved, rumors spread, friendships strengthened … la sobremesa is in full swing!

That person you know whose fingers are blue when yours are just fine, who always needs to wear an extra layer to keep warm … now you know that they are in fact a friolero.

When it’s too late for lunch but too early for dinner, when you need a little sweet treat to get you through to the next meal, you need to merendar.

In a country where the sun always seems to shine, el botellón is a popular alternative to gathering in a bar. Instead, every park, square and beach doubles as a perfect place to gather with friends.

Ever been undecided as to whether something was brown or grey? In Spanish you don’t have to decide; there is a word to describe exactly that which you couldn’t quite name: pardo.

Quite possibly one of the hardest words of the Spanish language to translate, duende refers to a strong feeling of passion – a powerful emotion often associated with flamenco …

The use of chili peppers is so common in Spanish and South American cuisine that the action of adding chili to a dish has actually got its own name: enchilar.To be used with caution …

The construction of this Spanish word resembles that of the English verb ‘to enchant’ and describes the action of a child who has developed an extremely strong emotional bond with their mother.

Perhaps a testimony to the importance of family relations, consuegro is a word which refers specifically to the relationship between the in-laws of a couple. As in any country or language, it can be good or bad.

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Sours: https://theculturetrip.com/europe/spain/articles/9-spanish-words-you-just-cant-translate-to-english/
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Contextual Dictionary > English - Spanish online dictionary & translator

That'srare.

Esraro.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare.

Estupendo.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare.

Rara.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare?

Debenecesitarl­as. Ustedestáaquí.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare? - Rare?

¿Consangre?

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare, rare, rareandabakedpotatoandsomespinach.

Pocohechoconunapatataasadayespinacas.

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It'srare.

Quéraro.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare. Potatoes?

Pocohecho. ¿Patatas?

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Mediumrare.

Mediocrudo.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

─ Veryrare.

Esmuyraro.

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Medium-rare.

Pocohecho.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare.

Pocohecho.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

That'srare.

Esoesraro.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Rare?

¿Pocohecho?

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Israre.

Esraro.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Veryrare.

Muyexclusiva.

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Veryrare.

Muyraras.

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Mediumrare?

¿Amediohacer?

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It'srare.

Elúnico.

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It'srare.

Esraro.

Corpus name: OpenSubtitles2018. License: not specified. References: http://opus.nlpl.eu/OpenSubtitles2018.php, http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~joerg/paper/opensubs2016.pdf

Sours: https://www.contextualdictionary.com/translate/english-spanish/RARE

34 Unique and Untranslatable Spanish Words You’ve Gotta Know

It’s right there—right on the tip of your tongue.

What the heck was that silly word you were thinking of?

Have you ever tried to describe something and been unable to find the right words for it?

Of course you have—that’s a natural part of learning any language.

Sometimes you even end up using a horribly wrong word or two.

It happens in your native language too, though, doesn’t it? Sometimes your language isn’t capable of describing a specific situation or item without using ten million extra words.

One of the great things about learning Spanish is that, the more you learn, the more you expand your mind.

For instance, there are numerous words that exist in Spanish that don’t have a direct English translation. That means that if you type them into Google for an English equivalent, chances are you’ll come up with a smattering of different words or sentences strung together to get the idea across.

That’s the point. For some, there’s simply not an easy translation. For others, the words may mean something direct in English (literally) but they mean something completely different when spoken in Spanish (context). All in all, you’ll be giving your brain tons of new ways to express ideas.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

So, now it’s time to expand your vocabulary and expand your mind. Here are some wonderfully unique Spanish words that’ll introduce you to a world of new ideas and expressions.

Just a quick note: Remember not to simply learn words in isolation! Put these words into sentences, use them in everyday conversations and watch authentic videos to remember them.

One great way to hear authentic Spanish speech is with FluentU

FluentU takes real-world videos—like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks—and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

Other sites use scripted content. FluentU uses a natural approach that helps you ease into the Spanish language and culture over time. You’ll learn Spanish as it’s actually spoken by real people.

FluentU has a wide variety of videos topics, as you can see here:

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FluentU brings native videos within reach with interactive transcripts. You can tap on any word to look it up instantly. Every definition has examples that have been written to help you understand how the word is used.

Plus, if you see an interesting word you don’t know, you can add it to a vocab list.

learn-spanish-with-interactive-captioned-videos

Review a complete interactive transcript under the Dialogue tab, and find words and phrases listed under Vocab.

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Learn all the vocabulary in any video with FluentU’s robust learning engine. Swipe left or right to see more examples of the word you’re on.

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The best part is that FluentU keeps track of the vocabulary that you’re learning, and gives you extra practice with difficult words. It'll even remind you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. Every learner has a truly personalized experience, even if they’re studying with the same video.

Start using FluentU on the website with your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the iOS or Android FluentU app.

Pardo

Some of the first things we teach our children are their colors right? Red, purple, black and so forth.

Have you ever seen a car that isn’t quite gray but it isn’t quite brown either? I have one, actually, and whenever English-speaking people ask me what color my car is I just shrug. When Spanish-speaking people ask me, I’ve got an answer.

Pardo — the color between gray and brown.

Lampiño

I have a friend who looks like he’s twelve even though he’s in his thirties. He doesn’t really have substantial facial hair, can’t grow a beard and has evidently found the fountain of youth.

I think we can all agree that we know someone or have seen someone like this. Maybe you can envision a boy in your middle school who was so proud of that one little whisker on his chin.

Lampiño — Hairless, but more specifically a man who cannot grow facial hair or has very thin facial hair.

Manco

It’s interesting that we don’t have this word in the English vocabulary. We have words that come close, but most of them are derogatory.

Manco A one-armed man.

Tuerto

Apparently the Spanish-speakers of the world are much better at describing people’s physical features. I feel like having a word like this in English would make it much easier to describe pirates.

Tuerto A one-eyed man.

Vergüenza Ajena

Have you ever heard of the website People Of Walmart?

If not, you should hop on over there once you’re done reading this post. It’s full of pictures of people who decided to go to Walmart with no shame. Some of them are in pajamas. Most are wearing clothes that are too tight, inappropriate or downright scary.

Or, if that’s not ringing a bell, have you seen the TV show “What Not To Wear?” All episodes feature hidden camera footage of someone walking down the street clearly unaware of how ridiculous or frumpy they look. Of course, you can’t say anything if you see something like this in real life. Instead, you just shake your head.

Vergüenza Ajena To feel embarrassed for someone even if they don’t feel embarrassed themselves. This is sometimes referred to as “secondhand embarrassment.”

Morbo

Do you love Tim Burton? Or the sight of blood? Maybe you enjoyed reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe. You have a love for something dark and you aren’t sure why because, let’s be honest, it’s a little creepy or gross.

Morbo A morbid fascination.

Empalagar

This one doesn’t happen to me very often because my sweet tooth is out of control. On a rare occasion, I’ll take a bite of dark chocolate cake with decadent chocolate frosting and think to myself, “Wow! That’s sweet!” Then a minute or two later I’ll regret that chocolate cake because my head is pulsing from sweetness overload.

Have you ever felt a little nauseated after seeing a couple being overly affectionate with each other, perhaps smothering each other in kisses on the street corner? This verb works for that, too.

Empalagar When something’s sickening or nauseating because it’s too sweet.

Quincena

Everyone is waiting for the quincena! 

That’s the bi-monthly payment that many employees receive in the Spanish-speaking world: Once on the 15th of the month, and once at the end of the month. It’s almost like saying “a fortnight,” but they use 15 days as a marker instead of 14.

For people awaiting paychecks, that first payment of the month always falls on the 15th. Apparently 15 is more significant in Spanish than in English in general!

QuincenaA period of 15 days.

Duende

It’s sometimes argued that this is the most difficult Spanish word to translate into English. Why? In Spanish literature, especially poetry, this word is used very often to describe how a person feels about nature. However, especially in Spain, it can be used to describe an indescribable charm or magic that isn’t limited to nature. You might hear about the duende of flamenco singing, for example.

Duende The feeling of awe and inspiration had, especially when standing in nature. The overwhelming sense of beauty and magic.

Aturdir

I have two daughters that are under the age of two. Naturally, my house is always a mess. I’m always a day behind and a dollar short.

This is a feeling I’m incredibly familiar with, but there’s no real way to describe it in English. Another time I often felt this way was when I was in college and I had two papers, an exam, a project and twenty pages of reading due the next day. Maybe I wouldn’t feel this so often if I were more organized…

We can also use this verb when we hear a piece of news that dumbfounds us or stuns us, leaving us speechless and/or bothered.

Aturdir When something overwhelms, bewilders, or stuns you to the point that you’re unable to focus and think straight.

Enmadrarse

While we’re on the subject of my daughters, my oldest daughter becomes very frantic when I leave her. Whether I’m leaving for work or just leaving the room, oftentimes she’ll panic. Even if her dad is still in the room with her, she’ll stress when I’m not with her.

Enmadrarse When a child is very attached (emotionally) to their mother.

Concuñado

This summer my husband was shadowing a doctor to learn more about his practice. When people asked how we knew the doctor it became really confusing really fast. If only concuñado were a word in English.

Concuñado— The husband of your spouse’s sister or the husband of your sister-in-law.

Consuegro

Another word about family that would solve a lot of confusing explanations.

My daughter has two sets of grandparents, my parents and my husband’s parents. We can clearly explain the relationship of both sets of grandparents to my daughter, to me and to my husband (mom and dad and the in-laws). But what are they to each other?

Consuegro The relationship between two sets of in-laws. My parents and my husband’s parents are consuegros.

Resol

Have you ever held a mirror in your hand, caught the sun’s glare just right and shined it in your older brother’s eyes? Let’s be honest, who hasn’t?

Resol The reflection of the sun off of a surface or the glare of the sun.

Recogerse

You’ve been sitting on the porch enjoying the evening. But now the sun has set. The yawns are starting to set in. The evening’s coming to an end and you all decide to go indoors.

Recogerse To go indoors in the evening once the day is over or to go home to rest or go to bed.

Estrenar

After you go shopping, you’re beyond excited to wear your new clothes for the first time. At least, that’s how I always feel. Sometimes I’ll even wait until I know that I’ll be around a lot of people so I can show off my new digs.

Estrenar — To wear something for the first time or to break something in.

Merendar

In English we often call this “going out for coffee.” But that’s very limiting to just getting coffee. Merendar widens that idea up quite a bit.

Merendar Going out to have a snack, coffee, brunch or some other small meal.

Sobremesa

While living in Argentina, my family loved to go out to eat at the local restaurants. The atmosphere was incredibly different from any restaurant I’ve been to in the United States.

Once the meal is over in the United States, the waiter usually will bring you the check, you’ll pay immediately and you’ll leave. In many Spanish cultures, it’s very common to stay at the table for hours after the meal is over and just talk over a cup of coffee.

Sobremesa The conversation that takes place at the dinner table after the meal is over.

 

Puente

Much like sobremesa, puente speaks to the Spanish culture. Now, puente does mean bridge but, in some cases, it’s a very specific (and abstract) bridge that we don’t talk about much in English.

Puente When Thursday is a holiday and you take off Friday to bridge the holiday to the weekend, or, likewise, when Tuesday is a holiday and you take off Monday to extend your weekend.

Antier

Technically this word can be translated directly into English, but it’s a lengthy, wordy phrase. Wouldn’t it be nice if we had a single word?

Antier The day before yesterday.

Antier is a bit antiquated, and anteayer is the more common phrase in modern day.

Friolento

My neighbor’s mom was in town staying with her for a few days. Overall, the weather was pretty nice and sunny. Then all of a sudden it started snowing. She came downstairs and told her daughter, “There’s a flight leaving in an hour, I’m out of here!”

Friolento— Someone who’s sensitive to the cold. The cold can refer to the weather, drinks or food.

Desvelado

We’ve all had those nights when we’ve tossed and turned and tried to sleep but just couldn’t convince the sandman to stop at our mattress.

Desvelado — Unable to sleep or sleep-deprived.

Te Quiero

You’re in a new relationship. You’re really starting to fall for this guy/girl. You like them as more than a friend, but jumping from friend to “I love you” is like trying to jump across a wide lake. If only you had a stepping stone.

Te Quiero More than “I like you,” but not quite “I love you.”

Tutear

Usted versus  is a confusing concept for someone who’s just learning Spanish or for someone who speaks no Spanish at all. We don’t have a formal and an informal speech in English.

Tutear When you speak to someone in the informal  form.

Estadounidense

While I was living in Argentina, I’d have friends ask me about my nationality. “I’m American,” I’d reply. “North American or South American?” “North American…I’m from the States…” would be my unsure reply to that follow-up question.

If only I’d known that Spanish has a more specific word for this than English does!

Estadounidense — Someone who’s from the United States.

Entrecejo

Do you remember Bert and Ernie from “Sesame Street”? Bert had that fabulous unibrow which was really a fuzzy line across his puppet face. He didn’t have an entrecejo.

Entrecejo — The space between your eyebrows.

Chapuza

Have you ever seen a car that’s literally being held together by zip ties and duct tape? Or maybe someone has made a cake and it looks awful?

Chapuza A lousy job, a shabby piece of work. When something’s put together poorly.

Dar Un Toque

This phrase was probably more applicable before texting was so widely used. But it’s still something that I find myself doing when I want someone to call me back and I know they won’t answer my initial call.

Dar Un Toque — Calling someone, letting it ring once, then hanging up so the person knows to call you back.

Golpista

Perhaps it’s a good thing that in English we haven’t needed this word. It makes sense that, with as much political unrest as there has been in Spanish-speaking countries, there would be a specific Spanish word for someone like Franco.

Golpista The leader of a military coup.

Mimoso

We all know that person who loves hugs and kisses and affection in general. They may even like to be fussed over. We could be talking about our grandma who loves hugging and kissing us, or our cat who wants your constant attention and petting.

Mimoso — Someone who enjoys being given affection or wants to give affection in the form of physical contact.

Pavonearse

Sometimes, the mimosos in our lives enjoy pavonearse.

Pavonearse Strutting around like a peacock, acting like they own the place.

Soler

Everyone does this a million times a day without even realizing it. Tying our shoes. Washing our hands a certain way. Pouring our cereal first then the milk.

Soler Doing something out of habit, doing something that you’re used to doing.

Tocayo

Maybe if we had a fun word in English like this, children would stop being annoyed when someone else has the same name as them.

Tocayo Someone who has the same name as you.

Amigovio

This isn’t a concept that’s uncommon in any culture worldwide. However, Spanish has consolidated another wordy English phrase into a single elegant word.

Amigovio(a) Friend with benefits.

 

Well, there you have it!

Next time you can’t find the word in English, just drop the Spanish word casually.

“Oh your name’s Jessica? My name’s Jessica. We’re totally tocayas.

Try it out!

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Spanish to rare translate

Translation of rare – English–Italian dictionary

Yet so many other factors also influence epistemic convictions that purely national styles may be relatively rare.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

Rare observations of important events such as birth, predation, innovation, and teaching can be vitally important in directing research toward potentially important areas.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

On the rare occasions where we present definitions out of sequence, we will explain what we are doing.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

With rare, athletic exceptions, the threat environment we now face is more symbolic than physical.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

There are good teachers in higher education who organize such debates, but they are rare.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

Rare species in communities of tropical insect herbivores: pondering the mystery of singletons.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

Subsequent residential relocation was rare and typically proved extremely difficult, requiring government approval and reassignment.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

In the same way, high-rent streets were rarely of high density, and severe crowding (two or more persons per room) was rare among highrent households.

From the Cambridge English Corpus

These examples are from corpora and from sources on the web. Any opinions in the examples do not represent the opinion of the Cambridge Dictionary editors or of Cambridge University Press or its licensors.

Sours: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english-italian/rare
The World’s Worst Translator - Alternatino

There are 2 main translations of rare in Spanish

: rare1rare2

rare1

raro, adj.

Pronunciation /rɛr//rɛː/

See Spanish definition of raro

adjectiverarer, rarest

  • 1

    • 1.1(uncommon)

      raro

      poco común

      the bird is a rare sight in this countryel ave rara vez se ve en este país

      • with a few rare exceptionssalvo raras excepciones
      • it is rare for this to happen during the summeres raro que esto suceda durante el verano
      • one of her rare television appearancesuna de sus poco frecuentes actuaciones en televisión
      • The best that most of us can do is to live with it, enjoy it and be thankful it is such a rare event.
      • She was diagnosed with a rare condition that inflamed her liver at just six weeks old.
      • The condition is so rare it only affects a handful of women in the world each year.
      • This very rare condition stops the nerve fibres from sending a signal to the brain.
      • In this day and age, it's a rare event due to the stormwater engineering in our cities.
      • Live Aid was a stadium concert held at a time when giant outdoor events were rare.
      • Either way, they are a rare event round here lately, so that makes them a big deal.
      • It also gives them a rare opportunity to meet recent graduates in a relaxed environment.
      • These events are so rare that it's hard to find direct evidence of them on earth.
      • I think you can get depression off the drug, although I still think it is a very rare event.
      • The rescue of Bulgarian Jews represents a rare event in the history of the civilised world.
      • Nine months later, the nation witnesses the rare situation of having no ruling party.
      • It is a very rare condition in Samantha's age group and she is one of only a few teenagers in the country to have it.
      • The condition is rare and is caused by the inheritance of an abnormal gene from an affected parent.
      • I think part of it was that staying up to midnight was a rare event, an exciting exception to our daily life.
      • Ben's condition is so rare that only 33 people in the world have ever been diagnosed with it.
      • Soon they would know far more than they ever wanted to about a rare condition called tuberous sclerosis.
      • They donated Vicki's heart for research so that experts can learn more about the rare condition.
      • Olivia suffers from two rare conditions which severely restrict almost everything she does.
      • But the event also offers a rare chance to put some of the town's most caring people into the spotlight.
    • 1.2 literary (unusually good)

      (talent/beauty)excepcional

      (talent/beauty)singular

      • For the rare or unusual gift, a trip round the antique or second-hand shops and a little imagination is all you need.
      • Artistically, it is a rare and precious gem that demands careful examination.
      • To be able to take a stand like he did is rare and precious thing in politics.
      • For the most part, though, the game is still in a position of rare strength.
    • 1.3mainly British informal (fine, uncommon)

      we had a rare (old) time at the partylo pasamos bomba en la fiesta informal

  • 2

    (rarefied)

    (atmosphere)enrarecido

There are 2 main translations of rare in Spanish

: rare1rare2

rare2

vuelta y vuelta, adj.

Pronunciation /rɛr//rɛː/

adjectiverarer, rarest

Cooking
  • 1

    (steak)vuelta y vuelta

    (steak)poco hecho Spain

    (steak)a la inglesa Mexico

    • To them, it tastes as good as medium rare steak.
    • This was sent back to the kitchen as the rare steak was overcooked and the sauce was burnt.
    • The spicy beef was rare and served with green mango and coriander, but lacked any real zing.
    • My comrade saw the perverse and absurd side of life and was happy to laugh along with it over a nice rare steak and a beer.
    • Why does everything else pale in comparison to the rich, glistening red of a rare filet mignon?
    • A rare steak is returned by a customer who wants it better done.
    • For this salad, the sirloin needs to be medium rare to rare, so it is sufficient just to sear the meat on both sides.
    • It is the sort of place I might take my grandfather for a rare steak and a bottle of Chateau Neuf de Pape.
    • We'll be cooking a steak rare on our barbeque and washing it down with some Chablis..
    • Top with slices of rare roast beef, then lettuce leaves, then tomato slices.
    • Why should I be obliged to trade my rare steak for some fool's chicken Kiev?
    • In another fragment he recommends hare, cooked rare, for a similar occasion.
    • The meat was cooked medium rare as ordered, and was tasty and delicious.
    • The meat was tasty and cooked perfectly to my medium rare specification.
    • Patty was so mad because she had ordered a well done steak only to get one that was very red and rare.
    • The steak could have been more tender if we had asked for it to be medium rare, which would have been better.
Sours: https://www.lexico.com/en-es/translate/rare

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