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Samsung Galaxy S series evolution

Just like Rome, which was not built in a day, it took Samsung some time to become the major smartphone manufacturer that it is today. Undoubtedly, the main driving force that kickstarted Sammy's rise to the top of the market was its flagship smartphone lineup. Indeed, ever since its inception, the pioneering Galaxy S and its successors have been the workhorses that made the company a household name.



We can't help but look back at the past and draw parallel lines between the previous Galaxy flagships and the new ones. Samsung has truly gone a long way, indeed, and we can only be excited about what's available now and what the future will offer. So, without further ado, let's explore the evolution of the most successful Android-powered smartphone lineup so far!

History of Samsung Galaxy S series:

Samsung Galaxy S (2010)

Released: June 2, 2010

Specs | Review

The very first Samsung Galaxy S was announced in 2010 and it quickly became clear that Samsung has a best-seller in the cards. Actually, Samsung sold way more than 20 million units of the phone, which undoubtedly warranted that it will be the forefather of a new device lineup.

Specs-wise, the phone was a monster for its time. It arrived with a huge 4-inch Super AMOLED display, which was among the biggest ones around. Samsung relied on its own 1GHz Hummingbird chipset, which made a debut alongside the Galaxy S. While its plastic design was not as good as the one of the metal Samsung Wave, it still laid the foundations that almost all upcoming Galaxy smartphones sat upon.

The Galaxy S was not a perfect phone by any means, as it had certain issues and quirks, but regardless, it is one of the more notable phones in Samsung's history and undoubtedly among the best phones of 2010. Many, including us, consider as the best Android had to offer in 2010.

Samsung Galaxy S II  (2011)

Released: April 28, 2011

Specs | Review

The second flagship in the Galaxy S series, the Galaxy S II, had the tough job of repeating the success of the Galaxy S. Spoiler alert, it did. Actually, it took Samsung merely 55 days to sell more than 3 million units worldwide, and in 5 months, over 10 million Galaxy S II units were shipped worldwide. Additionally, the phone was proclaimed as "Smartphone Of The Year" at MWC 2012. 

And indeed, what was not to like about this one? It was the thinnest phone in the world at the time of its arrival, measuring just 0.33” (8.49mm), and also came with an immensely speedier hardware and vastly improved Super AMOLED display in comparison with its predecessor. One of the more serious issues with the Galaxy S II was its design - uninspiring and stale, if you will, though this got addressed with the Galaxy S II's successor.

Samsung Galaxy S III (2012)

Released: May 22, 2012

Specs | Review

If the Galaxy S II had a tough job of making a name on the market, it's safe to say that the Galaxy S III had to accomplish a true feat. The public's expectations for the third Galaxy S flagship were quite high in 2012. Shortly put, the it was expected that the handset will pack enough hardware punch to sit atop the Android food chain and sport head-turning new design. Well, it met one of these for sure. Spoiler alert: it was mostly the hardware expectation.

True, the Galaxy S III didn't look half-bad at the time, but its plastic, "nature-inspired" design was a far cry from the anticipated ceramic body that many wanted to see. Well, it was not the highest-quality device around in 2012, but it certainly was one of the most capable. With the gorgeous display and super-fluid performance, the Galaxy S III shone with its refined TouchWiz UI and overall user experience. 

Samsung Galaxy S4 (2013)

Released: April 27, 2013

Specs | Review

Samsung Galaxy S III. Hold that image in your mind, now imagine a similar device with a slimmer profile, more powerful hardware, and... better in every other way, actually. That's the Galaxy S4 for you. Apart from switching from roman to Arabic numerals, the S4 came with a larger display, speedier SoC, improved camera, and even more feature-rich TouchWiz UI, while being even more compact than its immediate predecessor.

On its own, the Galaxy S4 was a great phone, but was it a worthy upgrade for the S III owners out there? Probably the upgrade was not that compelling, even more so when you remember the differences between the SII and the SIII. Still, for those who were just then jumping on the Galaxy bandwagon, the Galaxy S4 was one of the best phones for its time.

Samsung Galaxy S5 (2014)

With the Galaxy S5, Samsung decided to spice things up. Although the design remained mostly the same, the handset was the first Samsung flagship to be water- and dust-resistant, borrowing these features from the S4 Active. The "glam" design of the rear cover was not the most appealing thing out there, but still, it did its job fine - it attracted attention.

All in all, the S5 was yet another re-iteration of the winning formula that was presented with the SIII, with the focus being on actually useful hardware and software features. True, gimmicky functionalities were still part of TouchWiz, but Samsung had toned them a bit this time around. Still, the Galaxy S5 remained universally critiqued for its uninspiring design.

Samsung Galaxy S6 & S6 edge (2015)

Released: April 10, 2015

Specs | Review 

Keeping an ear close to the ground, Samsung really stepped its design game with the Galaxy S6. Glass and metal, intertwined in a slim body that is as eye-catchy as it gets. For the first time here, a super sharp Quad HD panel arrives for an even crispier experience: that's a full 2560 x 1440 pixels, more than on most laptops at the time. Interestingly, Samsung abolished three features that many people loved in the S5: the water protection, the removable battery and the microSD card, and that led to a wave of criticism from some in the community. 

In every other way, the Galaxy S6 was a substantial evolution step. A specs monster no matter where you look, the handset was no slouch in the hardware department. Software-wise, it showed us that when Samsung wills something, it's more than capable of achieving it - toned-down TouchWiz, almost no unnecessary and gimmicky features, and a top-notch user experience is all you got. 

The S6 edge, on the other hand, introduced the dual curved display feature, which was a first for Samsung and the industry as a whole. It was arguably the more interesting smartphone, with the screen being among the chief differences between the two phones.

Samsung Galaxy S7 & S7 edge (2016)

Released: March 11, 2016

Specs | Review

In 2016, Samsung had a regular Galaxy S7 and a radical, curved-screen Galaxy S7 Edge that was bigger and bolder. The two were an evolution of the successful S6 design and indeed, why change what people loved.

The biggest change in these phones was probably in the camera department: these were the first to adopt the Dual Pixel auto focus technology that allowed the camera to focus incredibly quickly. The S7 series also delivered a big improvement in low-light photos and were widely considered as a big step forward for smartphone photography.

Samsung, however, felt the discontent with the decision to remove some features from the S6 and two of the removed features were back in the S7 series: it featured a water protection rating and a microSD card for expandable storage, but the removable battery that was removed from the S6 series was gone forever, never to return on a Galaxy S phone.

Both phones packed a punch with the top specs for the time and the S7 Edge in particular was a best seller. 

Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus (2017)

Released: April 21, 2017

Specs | Review

The Galaxy S8 series arrived after a hugely successful year for Samsung and the S7 lineup. The Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8 Plus were not a revolutionary improvement, but they did introduce much slimmer bezels on the front as Samsung moved the front-facing fingerprint sensor from the S7 series to the back on the S8 family.

These were also the first phones to come with Bixby, the unfortunate Samsung assistant that never really got popular and was more of an annoyance than an improvement. 

Apart from that, the Galaxy S8 family was powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor, while in markets outside the US, it used Samsung’s own Exynos 8895. 

Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus (2018)

Released: March 16, 2018

Specs | Review




The Galaxy S9and S9 Plusarrived in 2018 and brought an improved camera with dual aperture that promised better low-light photography, as well as overall enhancements in performance.

The S9 were powered by the top of the line chip for the time, the Snapdragon 845, in the United States (globally, phones shipped with the Samsung-made Exynos 9810 chip) and had 4GB of RAM on the S9 and 6GB of RAM on the S9 Plus. On board storage stood at 64GB with the option to expand via microSD cards.

One thing Samsung fixed this year was the fingerprint sensor. The S8 series had the fingerprint weirdly positioned to the side of the rear camera and users would often hit the camera lens instead of the fingerprint scanner, plus it was a bit high and hard to reach. On the S9, the fingerprint is still on the back of the phone, but it is below the camera where it makes a lot more sense and is easier to reach. 

Samsung Galaxy S10e, S10 and S10 Plus (2019)

Released: March 8, 2019

Spaecs | Review



In 2019, for the first time, Samsung introduced three flagship phones in the Galaxy S series: the small Galaxy S10, the large Galaxy S10 Plus, and a new model that targets those looking for a super compact phone that you can easily use with one hand, the Galaxy S10e. These phones introduced a punch hole design that significantly slimmed down bezels.

All phones share the same Snapdragon 855 processor and an impressive for the time 128GB of on board storage, plus they stand out with offering features like a 3.5mm headphone jack and a microSD card slot that have been removed by many manufacturers in 2019.

The S10 and the S10 Plus introduce a new, triple-camera system that includes an ultra-wide, a wide and a telephoto lens, while the super compact Galaxy S10e did not have the telephoto lens.

Samsung Galaxy S20, S20 Plus and S20 Ultra (2020)

Released: March 11, 2020

Specs | Review




The Galaxy S20series focus on improved cameras that can zoom further, as well as the adoption of 5G connectivity across the range and the addition of large batteries. 

The series are led by the S20 Ultra, a phone that features a substantially better camera system than the Galaxy S20 and S20 Plus. The Ultra for the first time on a Samsung phone introduces a massive 108-megapixel main camera sensor that combines multiple pixels into one to create better looking photos and it is also the first Samsung phone ever to come with a folded, periscope lens with a 4X native zoom and 10X Hybrid Optic lossless zoom, but then you can even push it all the way to a 100X using digital zoom.

All three Galaxy S20 series phones offer support for 5G, and they arrive with big batteries: a massive, 5,000mAh one on the Galaxy S20 Ultra, a 4,500mAh battery cell on the S20 Plus and a 4,000mAh cell on the S20.  The trio comes with the Snapdragon 865 processor in the United States (Exynos 990 in most of the rest of the world) and a typical 12GB of RAM, plus you get a base storage of 128GB that you can expand via microSD cards.

The S20 series also mark the first time Samsung removes the 3.5mm headphone jack from its flagship series.

Samsung Galaxy S21, S21 Plus and S21 Ultra (2021)

Release date: January 29th, 2020

Galaxy S21 Ultra review | Galaxy S21+ review |Galaxy S21 review

The Galaxy S21 series comes in three flavors: the compact, 6.2" Galaxy S21, the larger-screen, 6.7" Galaxy S21 Plus, and then the even bigger and bulkier 6.8" S21 Ultra that also has the most advanced camera setup of the three.

All three phones share a lot in common: all are powered by the same top-end Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 chip (an Exynos 2100 processor if you live outside the US), all support 120Hz fast refresh rates and all run on Android 11 with the Samsung's custom One UI 3.1 that brings sleeker looks and added functionality. All three phones also support 5G connectivity.

And then come the differences. The Galaxy S21 and the S21 Plus have identical triple-camera setup, with a main, ultra-wide and a 3X hybrid zoom telephoto camera. In fact, they use the same hardware as the S20 and S20+, but some improvements have happened in the way these cameras process photos. The S21 Ultra, however, is different: it features a larger main sensor, a 108-megapixel one, an ultra-wide shooter, and then, two telephoto zoom lenses, one at 3X zoom, and another one of the periscope kind that provides 10X zoom. Combined with Samsung's clever algorithms, you can use the latter camera to get up to 100X zoom in shots.

As for the batteries, the S21 comes with a 4,000mAh cell, the S21+ features a 4,800mAh battery and the S21 Ultra has a 5,000mAh battery capacity. This year, Samsung is removing the charger from the box, microSD card support and MST support in Samsung Pay, breaking with traditions established in the past.

Sours: https://www.phonearena.com/news/Samsung-Galaxy-S-series-history-evolution_id78382

Today’s Samsung Galaxy S smartphones look much different than they did upon their 2010 debut, but one constant has been Samsung’s ability to innovate. From upgrades like water resistance and fitness tracking to massive improvements in the quality of its camera, display and battery power, the Galaxy S series has made extraordinary progress in its 11 years.

And now, with the introduction of the Galaxy S21 series, Samsung is taking its flagship smartphone to even greater heights. The new devices boast a superior multi-camera system, 8K video recording, Space Zoom as well as large display sizes so you can work and play with ease.  

Here’s a look back at some of the key developments in Samsung Galaxy S history.

June 2010: The Original Samsung Galaxy S hits the market.

The original Samsung Galaxy S smartphone featured an Android operating system, a removable 1500 mAh battery and replaceable storage via a microSD chip. However, it was the crystal-clear Super AMOLED display that CNET lovingly described as a “4-inch behemoth.”

The size and quality of Samsung Galaxy S screens would become two of the series' most talked-about features, through to the present day.

May 2011: The S2's bigger screen but slimmer body proves to be a major hit.

The Samsung Galaxy S2 sold more than 10 million units in its first five months, establishing the Galaxy S as the premier line of Android smartphones and one of the top handheld devices on the market.

The S2 improved upon the size and quality of its predecessor’s display, but its most acclaimed feature was a light, thin design that made the phone remarkably easy to handle. Engadget described the S2's thin profile as “a stunning feat of engineering.”

May 2012: The S3 kicks off a series of battery innovations.

The Galaxy S3 featured a 2,100 mAH battery that was one of the bigger smartphone batteries around, and 40% more powerful than the one the Galaxy S released 2 years prior. As a result, the phone was able to withstand the battery drain with its high-performing Exynos Quad processor.

In the years to come, a series of new features would make battery life one of Samsung’s major competitive selling points. The S4 worked with wireless charging accessories and the S5 introduced an ultra power saving mode that allowed the phone to last several days in a standby setting. Later, the S6 debuted adaptive fast charging to help users juice up their devices more quickly.

April 2013: S Health turns the Galaxy S4 into a fitness tracker.

The Samsung Galaxy S4 was the first S series device to launch with the S Health fitness tracker app pre-installed. Via the S4’s built-in pedometer, the app empowered users to keep tabs on their steps, sleep patterns, calories and diet.

In addition, the S4 laid the groundwork for even better fitness tracking moving forward. Samsung became one of the first companies to launch a smartwatch when it released the Galaxy Gear later in 2013, and 2014’s Galaxy S5 was the first smartphone to come with a built-in heart rate monitor.

April 2014: S5 introduces water and dust resistance.

The Galaxy S5 featured a small cover over the USB port at the bottom of the device, providing added protection against dust and water. As such, the S5 was able to withstand submersion of up to 1 meter of water for up to 30 minutes.

Samsung would offer further protection from the elements with the introduction of the S7, the first Galaxy S device to earn an IP-68 rating. Starting with the S7, Galaxy S phones are protected against dust, as well as resistant to up to 5 feet of water for up to a half-hour.

April 2015: The Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge deliver the first metal design in S series history.

In the spring of 2015, Samsung released the Galaxy S6 and the S6 Edge, 2 devices that stood out as a departure from previous models in the Galaxy S line.

The S6 and S6 Edge were the first in the series to ditch the plastic shell and removable battery that had been part of the previous five efforts. Instead, these devices featured a metal frame and glass backing, making for an elegant design that The Verge said “looks great and feels even better.”

Both the S6 and S6 Edge also featured 5.1-inch screens with a pixel density of 577 pixels-per-inch, well above the clarity of competing smartphones at the time. In addition, the S6 Edge featured an impressive curved display that wrapped around part of the phone’s left and right sides.

March 2016: The Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge take the smartphone camera to the next level with dual pixel autofocus and the industry's widest aperture.

The Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge represented the culmination of years of improvements to Samsung’s camera technology.

The original Galaxy S featured a 5-megapixel primary camera. Over time, the company would add more sensors to its cameras, as well as other key upgrades. The S3 introduced HDR mode to capture more lifelike photos, and the S5 debuted phase detection autofocus, a feature that allowed the camera to focus more quickly so that users could capture moving objects before they went out of frame. Along the way, Samsung Galaxy S phones made it easier to access the camera straight from the home screen.

Finally, the S7 and S7 Edge introduced a 12-megapixel setup that Business Insider called “the best camera ever put on a smartphone.” The new camera was bolstered by dual pixel autofocus, a feature by which each pixel focuses and captures light simultaneously. In addition, the S7 excelled in low-light settings due to an f/1.7 aperture that was the widest of any smartphone camera at the time.

April 2017: The Galaxy S8 and S8+ introduce the world to Infinity Display.

The Galaxy S8 and S8+ debuted a revolutionary design feature known as “Infinity Display.” By removing the home button, Samsung extended the screen to all corners of the device, covering almost the entirety of the phone’s face. As a result, the devices had a slim, easy-to-handle design, despite boasting screens of 5.8 and 6.2 inches, respectively.

Gizmodo said the S8's rounded edges and curves "create the effect of a display that’s simply floating in the air or hovering just above your hand," adding that the experience "feels like you're looking at a phone from the future..."

The S8 and S8+ also included a facial recognition unlock feature, as well as an iris detection system for added security.

March 2018: The Galaxy S9 and S9+ open new avenues for creative expression with improved low-light photography and personalized avatars.

The Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9+ have taken the aforementioned “best camera ever put on a smartphone” and made it even better. With a new dual aperture camera lens*, the S9 phones receive 28% more light than the S8, allowing users to take bright, lifelike photos in low-light settings. Enabling Live Focus mode on the S9+ adjusts background blur so subjects are captured better, and at 960 frames per second, super slow-mo slows down reality so users can enjoy every frame of video.

In addition, Samsung has added a key improvement to Bixby, the built-in intelligent interface introduced in the S8. By turning the camera viewfinder on themselves, users can create their own animated AR emojis to share with friends and loved ones.

February 2019: The Galaxy S10 series debuted for the 10th anniversary of the Samsung Galaxy S flagship line.

Unveiled during the "Samsung Galaxy Unpacked 2019" press event on February 20, 2019, the S10 series is the tenth generation of Samsung's Galaxy S smartphones.

The Galaxy S10 and Galaxy S10+ are characterized by screen size and an additional front-facing camera on the S10+. Samsung also introduced a smaller model, the Galaxy S10e, plus a 5G-compatible version, the Galaxy S10 5G.

February 2020: The Galaxy S20 debuts with 5G, a 120Hz display and more.

The S20 series includes the Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20+ and Galaxy S20 Ultra models. Upgrades over previous models and improved specifications include a display with a 120 Hz refresh rate, an improved camera system supporting 8K video recording and a super-resolution zoom.

January 2021: The Samsung Galaxy S21 hits the market with the latest updates and includes 3 different devices.

The Samsung Galaxy S21 is available for preorder on January 14, which is good news for anyone who is looking for a cutting-edge phone to start off the new year. 

The S21 series includes the S21 5G, S21+ 5G and S21 Ultra 5G. These devices have 8k video recording, Space Zoom, Directors View, multi-lens camera systems and an all-day intelligent battery. Plus, the S21 Ultra can be paired with the S Pen for even more ways to edit and create.

Samsung has something for everyone. From water resistance to an Infinity Display, the Galaxy S series has left an indelible mark on how we experience smartphone technology. And these innovations and their subsequent success have spawned the popular Galaxy Note series, the affordable A series and the innovative Galaxy Z series.

But for all the great smartphones available on the Galaxy line, the future is even more exciting. If Samsung's recent track record is any indication, there are plenty of thrilling technological advancements waiting just around the corner. So be sure to check out all the great devices and accessories from Samsung at Verizon.

Click here to learn more about the new Samsung Galaxy S21 phone launch, including release dates, features, prices and color options.

This content is provided for information purposes only. All information included herein is subject to change without notice. Verizon is not responsible for any direct or indirect damages, arising from or related to use or reliance of the above content.

Sours: https://www.verizon.com/articles/A-brief-timeline-of-the-Samsung-Galaxy-S-smartphone/
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Best Samsung phones 2021: Which Galaxy model should you buy?

The best Samsung phones encompass everything that Androids have to offer, from mighty flagships to surprisingly full-featured budget devices. Whether it's the inexpensive Galaxy A32 5G or the expansive (and expensive) Galaxy Z Fold 3, Samsung has an option at every price. 

Samsung may be skipping out on a Galaxy Note model this year and the status of the rumored Galaxy S21 FE is up in the air, but we've seen plenty of new contenders for the title of best Samsung phone in 2021. Samsung's rolled out three new Galaxy S flagships, Galaxy A midrange phones and two foldable devices that are among the best the company's ever released. You'll certainly find some of the best phones overall among Samsung's offerings.

It all comes down to figuring out what kind of phone you're looking for and how much you're willing to pay. No matter what the answers to those questions are, there's likely a device for your needs among the best Samsung phones.

What are the best Samsung phones?

The Galaxy S21 Ultra is Samsung's ultimate smartphone at this point. The Galaxy S21 and Galaxy S21 Plus are both impressive phones in their own right, with dynamic displays, fast processors and lower price tags compared to last year's S20 models. They're just as deserving a place in the debate over the best Samsung phone.

There are cheaper options, still, especially with the launch of the Galaxy A52 5G and Galaxy A32 5G. Last year's Galaxy S20 FE also remains a popular option for getting flagship features at a lower price, though a new version could be coming before the end of the year. Both of these are excellent back to school options, with Samsung's three-year update promise to back them both up.

As for Samsung's foldable phones, we've had a chance to review both the Galaxy Z Fold 3 and Galaxy Z Flip 3. The former is the more impressive addition to Samsung's phone lineup, thanks to a giant screen that offers a 120Hz refresh rate. But the Galaxy Z Flip 3 is still a compelling option, thanks largely to its lower price tag.

The best Samsung phones you can buy right now

1. Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra

The best Samsung phone you can buy

Specifications

Screen Size: 6.8 inches

Android Version: 11 with One UI 3

Processor: Snapdragon 888 (US)/Exynos 2100 (WW)

Cameras: 108MP main, 12MP ultrawide, 2 10MP telephoto, and laser autofocus sensor (Rear); 40MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 12GB, 16GB/128, 256, 512GB

Reasons to buy

+Dynamic 6.8-inch AMOLED display+Dual telephoto lenses+S Pen support

Reasons to avoid

-No charger in box-Lacks microSD card slot

The Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra takes its spot at the top of our best Samsung phones list for a number of reasons. Start with the Snapdragon 888 system-on-chip, which powers the U.S. version of the phone, which gives the best performance results we’ve seen from an Android device. We also appreciate that the S21 Ultra is the first phone outside of Samsung’s Galaxy Note lineup to support the S Pen, giving your productivity an added boost.

But a couple of features really stand out from those selling points. The Galaxy S21 Ultra features a dynamic display with a refresh rate that can scale between 10Hz and 120Hz, depending on what you’re doing. (Tasks like scrolling get the faster refresh rate, while more static activities get a battery-saving speed.) You’ll find two telephoto lenses on the back of the S21 Ultra — one with a 3x zoom, the other capable of a 10x zoom — cementing Samsung’s place as the phone maker that handles zooms lenses the best.

The Galaxy S21 Ultra remains a pricey phone, but it’s debuting at $200 less than the Galaxy S20 Ultra cost when it arrived in 2020. If you want the best features Samsung offers, snap up this device right away.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra review.

2. Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra

Still a great Samsung phone with an S Pen included

Specifications

Screen Size: 6.9 inches

Android Version: 10 with One UI 2.5

Processor: Snapdragon 865 Plus (US)/Exynos 990 (WW)

Cameras: 108MP, 12MP, 12MP and laser autofocus sensor (Rear); 10MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 12 GB/128, 512 GB

Reasons to buy

+Dynamic 120Hz display+Smoother S Pen performance+Powerful 50x zoom camera

Reasons to avoid

-Large camera bump on back-Expensive

It's been more than a year since the Galaxy Note 20 arrived, and it's since been supplanted as the best Samsung phone by the Galaxy S21 Ultra. Still, the Galaxy Note 20 remains a great choice for phablet fans given all the advances Samsung introduced in this model. 

One of the most eye-catching features on the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra remains the phone's dynamic refresh rate that automatically adjusts based on what you're using the phone for. There are other productivity-minded features, too: The S Pen is more responsive than ever, with latency reduced to 9ms, and unlike the S21 Ultra and Galaxy Z Fold 3, the Note 20 Ultra includes a slot for the S Pen. The phone is also powered by the Snapdragon 865 Plus, which is still an excellent chipset even after the Snapdragon 888's arrival.

The Note 20 Ultra's hefty camera bump takes some getting used to, and people who balk at paying four figures for a smartphone will want to look elsewhere. But the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra delivers one of the most versatile big phone experiences of any Samsung handset. With no new Note coming in 2021, the Note 20 Ultra remains the best phablet you can get — and a less expensive alternative to the newer Galaxy Z Fold 3.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra review.

3. Samsung Galaxy S21

Samsung’s lower-cost flagship phone

Specifications

Screen Size: 6.2 inches

Android Version: 11 with One UI 3

Processor: Snapdragon 888 (US)/Exynos 2100 (WW)

Cameras: 12MP main, 12MP ultrawide, 64MP telephoto (Rear); 10MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 8GB/128, 256GB

Reasons to buy

+Excellent dynamic 120Hz display+Powerful performance+Excellent telephoto lens

Reasons to avoid

-No charger or microSD card slot-Plastic back

The price is right for the Galaxy S21, the least expensive of the 2021 Samsung flagships. At $799, the Galaxy S21’s starting price is $200 less than what Samsung charged for last year’s Galaxy S20. That price also compares well to Apple's iPhone 12.

In some ways, the feature set reflects that lower price, as Samsung uses plastic for the case on the S21 and leaves out a microSD card. You’ll also have to deal with a 6.2-inch screen with scaled-back resolution. But that display also has a dynamic refresh rate, altering the speed at which the screen refreshes based on the task on hand. And the Galaxy S21 has the same Snapdragon 888 chipset that powers the S21 Ultra to the best performance for an Android phone.

Throw in excellent cameras that fare well against comparable models from Apple and Google, and you’ve got a great phone for a less astronomical price.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S21 review.

4. Samsung Galaxy S21 Plus

Another big screen option from Samsung

Specifications

Screen Size: 6.7 inches

Android Version: 11 with One UI 3

Processor: Snapdragon 888 (US)/Exynos 2100 (WW)

Cameras: 12MP main, 12MP ultrawide, 64MP telephoto (Rear); 10MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 8 GB/128, 512 GB

Reasons to buy

+Gorgeous 120Hz AMOLED display+Excellent performance+Crazy zoom feature

Reasons to avoid

-Bulky and unwieldy-No microSD slot or included charger

There's not much separating the Galaxy S21 Plus from the Galaxy S21, though the former phone offers a larger screen, bigger battery and a more polished design than the less expensive S21. Whether that's worth the extra $200 depends on how you feel about extra screen space, as the S21 Plus lasted about as long as the S21 on our battery test even with the larger power pack.

You will get an excellent phablet if you opt for the Galaxy S21 Plus, particularly when it comes to the 6.7-inch OLED panel. That's because like other members of the S21 family, the Plus' screen has a dynamic refresh rate that adjusts based on what you're using the phone to do. (It matches the S21's 48-120 Hz range.) Cameras are also excellent, particularly the Galaxy S21 Plus' telephoto lens, which features a 3x optical zoom and a 30x zoom digital zoom.

Fans of big phones won't mind how bulky the Galaxy S21 Plus can be. They'll just be happy to have a solidly designed phone that gives them the display real estate they demand.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S21 Plus review.

5. Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3

Samsung’s best foldable phone

Specifications

Screen size: 7.6 inches (inner), 6.2 inches (outer)

Android version: 11 with One UI 3.1

Processor: Snapdragon 888

Cameras: 12MP wide, 12MP ultrade, 12MP telephoto (rear); 10MP (front); 4MP (under-display)

RAM/Storage: 12GB/256GB, 512GB

Reasons to buy

+Dual 120Hz displays+Durable design with water resistance rating+More apps supported for multitasking

Reasons to avoid

-S Pen isn't included-Still expensive

Samsung’s premium foldable phone remains the Galaxy Z Fold 3, especially now that the new version has added 120Hz displays both inside and out. What’s more, the new Galaxy Z Fold 3 is more durable than ever, thanks to an IPX8 water resistance rating, The Armor Aluminum body is stronger than before while the phone’s use of a Gorilla Glass Victus display should reduce the likelihood of scratches and other damage.

One of the best things Samsung did was to convince more app makers to optimize their software to work with the Galaxy Z Fold 3’s foldable display. You’ll see popular apps like Spotify and TikTok now take advantage of the Z Fold 3’s unique form factor. Samsung added S Pen support, too, and while the main display certainly gives you a lot of real estate for sketching and taking notes, it’s a shame the stylus is an optional accessory (meaning you’ll have to pay extra to pick up both an S Pen and a case for holding the stylus).

Battery life on the Galaxy Z Fold 3 could be better, and while the debut price is lower than what it was for the Galaxy Z Fold 2, $1,799 is still a lot to pay for the phone. Nevertheless, if you want a premium device that gives you plenty of screen to work with, the Galaxy Z Fold 3 is the best Samsung phone yet to offer a foldable display.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3 review.

6. Samsung Galaxy S20 FE

Best value for a Samsung phone

Specifications

Screen Size: 6.5 inches

Android Version: 10 with One UI 2.5

Processor: Snapdragon 865

Cameras: 12MP, 12MP and 8MP (Rear); 32MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 6 GB/128 GB

Reasons to buy

+Affordable price+Big 120Hz display+Solid performance

Reasons to avoid

-Battery life could be better-Doesn't ship with fast charger

Maybe you were impressed by the different Galaxy S20 models that debuted in 2020, but you were put off by the fact that they cost $999 or more. The Samsung Galaxy S20 FE can alleviate that sticker shock by packing in many of the best features in the S20 but for $300 less. It compares well to a number of phones, including Apple's latest models, as we found in our Samsung Galaxy S20 FE vs. iPhone 12 face-off.

This $699 phone runs on a powerful Snapdragon 865 system-on-chip with 5G connectivity. Its 6.5-inch OLED display features the super-fast 120Hz refresh rate that makes for smoother scrolling. And while its 8MP telephoto lens isn't as sharp as the 64MP lens on the S20, we're still impressed by the Space Zoom feature.

You'll make some tradeoffs with the Galaxy S20 FE — the phone features a plastic case and its included charger isn't as fast — but this is a great phone for people who want premium features at a reasonable price. At $100 less than the Galaxy S21, it's still a good value unless you have to have the Snapdragon 888. A rumored successor, the Galaxy S21 FE, may not materialize this year, so the Galaxy S20 FE remains the best way of getting flagship features for less.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S20 FE review.

7. Samsung Galaxy A52 5G

Low-cost 5G from Samsung

Specifications

Screen Size: 6.5 inches

Android Version: 11 with One UI 3

Processor: Snapdragon 750G

Cameras: 64MP, 12MP, 5MP and 5MP (Rear); 32MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 6 GB/128 GB

Reasons to buy

+120Hz display+Versatile main camera

Reasons to avoid

-Inconsistent performance from other cameras-Display scratches easily

Samsung's midrange phone lineup is currently led by the Galaxy A52 5G. (That's the case in the U.S., at least, where the Galaxy A72 5G won't be shipping.) Despite a lower price tag than the Galaxy S series, you'll find a lot of the key features that highlight those phones. Samsung includes a 6.5-inch display with a 120Hz refresh rate, though there's no dynamic adjustment for the Galaxy A52 5G's screen.

The main 64MP lens takes some pretty compelling shots, even if the other cameras on the phone (a 12MP lens plus dedicated macro and depth sensors) can't keep pace with the photos produced by top camera phones in this price range. You will appreciate the A52 5G's Snapdragon 750G chipset, its hearty battery life and the fact that a phone charger ships with the phone.

If you're looking for a Samsung phone for less than $500, the Galaxy A52 5G is a pretty solid choice, though the Galaxy A42 and A32 go even lower on price. (See how these phones stack up in our Galaxy A52 5G vs. Galaxy A42 5G vs. Galaxy A32 5G comparison.)

Read our full Samsung Galaxy A52 5G review.

8. Galaxy A32 5G

The budget 5G option from Samsung

Specifications

Screen size: 6.5 inches

Android version: 11 with One UI 3.1

Processor: Dimensity 720

Cameras: 48MP main, 8MP ultrawide, 5MP macro, 2MP depth (Rear); 13MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 4GB/64GB

Reasons to buy

+Very low price+Four years of security patches+Great battery life+90Hz refresh rate

Reasons to avoid

-Subpar HD+ display

Samsung isn't resting on its laurels with the affordable 5G smartphone market. Cue the Galaxy A32 5G, a sub-$300 5G-capable smartphone. It sports many things people love about Galaxy phones, but with some corners cut to keep the price down. The biggest downside is the underwhelming display. The size combined with the low resolution doesn't look great in person.

However, if you're strapped for cash and want a phone with decent cameras, the Galaxy A32 5G is one you should consider. With its big 6.5-inch screen, the A32 is not a small phone. But it packs a 5,000 mAh battery that lasts a really long time — almost 12 hours in our testing with its adaptive refresh rate enabled. You can also expect the Galaxy A32 to go for longer than many other budget options, with Samsung promising three years of Android updates and four years of security patches.

Read our full Galaxy A32 5G review.

9. Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3

Making foldable phones more accessible

Specifications

Screen size: 6.7 inches (inner), 1.9 inches (outer)

Android version: 11 with One UI 3.1

Processor: Snapdragon 888

Cameras: 12MP wide, 12MP ultrawide (rear); 10MP (front)

RAM/Storage: 8GB/128GB, 256GB

Reasons to buy

+More affordable+Enhanced durability+Bigger cover display

Reasons to avoid

-Short battery life-No telephoto lens

The Galaxy Z Flip 3 is the first “affordable” foldable phone. Starting at $999, it offers top-end specs and the ability to fold in half horizontally. This makes for a very pocketable device that packs a serious punch. 

That said, the Galaxy Z Flip 3 has notable flaws, such as its short battery life. In our testing, it lasted for just 6 hours when the display was locked at 60Hz. And the Flip 3 lacks a telephoto lens, unlike other phones at this price range. But the Galaxy Z Flip 3 is a novel thing.

At this point, the Galaxy Z Flip 3 is one of the best Samsung phones you can buy, but others like the Galaxy S21 Ultra or Galaxy S21 Plus are better phones altogether. 

Read our full Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 review.

10. Samsung Galaxy A71 5G

Last year's phone is still solid

Specifications

Screen Size: 6.7 inches

Android Version: 10 with One UI 2

Processor: Snapdragon 765

Cameras: 64MP, 12MP, 5MP depth and 5MP macro (Rear); 32MP (Front)

RAM/Storage: 8 GB/128 GB

Reasons to buy

+Good battery life+Solid performance+Price has dropped

Reasons to avoid

-Middling cameras-Last year's hardware

You might have forgotten about the year-old Samsung Galaxy A71 5G, especially since Samsung has launched the Galaxy A72, which promises newer hardware, even if it lacks 5G connectivity. But the A72 won't be headed to the U.S. — it's too similar to the Galaxy S20 FE, Samsung's decided. That means the A71 5G is still an option in this country, especially since its price has fallen from the original $599 cost and it remains available from both carriers and retailers.

The Galaxy A71's launch price was already pretty low for a 5G phone, so anything below $599 is an even better value. That's especially true, when you consider that the A71 5G offers good battery life, decent performance and — most importantly — connectivity with all kinds of 5G networks. You'll also appreciate the big, 6.7-inch OLED screen, which reinforces the idea that you have big screen options beyond the pricey Galaxy Note series.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy A71 5G review.

How to choose the best Samsung phones

Sours: https://www.tomsguide.com/best-picks/best-samsung-phone

Worst to best: The Samsung Galaxy S series, ranked

Samsung’s Galaxy S series made its debut on June 4, 2010, and since then it’s become the phone line most people think of when Android is mentioned.

Not all phones are created equal though, so to mark a decade of Galaxy S devices we thought it would be a fun idea to rank each generation in order from worst to best. We tried to balance the critical and commercial reception with the actual importance of each phone(s), the features and specs on offer, and our own gut feelings. We’ve also decided to only stick to the mainline releases, so that means no entries like the Galaxy S20 FE and Galaxy S4 Zoom.

Related:Best Samsung Galaxy deals

It goes without saying that this is all for a bit of fun, your opinions may vary! It’s also worth remembering that many of these phones are among the best the smartphone world has ever seen — being the worst of the very best is still pretty great. With all that said, be sure to vote for your favorite Galaxy S series in the poll below and give us your own rankings in the comments!

For a more detailed look at the history of Galaxy S phones, be sure to read our retrospective here.


12. Samsung Galaxy S6

2015’s Galaxy S6 was a notable release for a couple of reasons. It marked the range’s first foray into the glass design territory popularized by the iPhone. It also saw Samsung match Apple in terms of pricing strategy, having generally been cheaper than the iPhone until this point. But the Galaxy S6 takes the wooden spoon in our rankings because it cut or compromised so many features seen on the Galaxy S5 in order to achieve this design. That meant no IP rating, no removable battery, no microSD support, and a much smaller battery.

The good

  • Premium design
  • Exynos 7420 chipset was a beast
  • Great camera
  • Fingerprint reader that wasn’t terrible
  • Native wireless charging (no special case required)

The bad

  • Tiny battery
  • No IP rating
  • No microSD expansion or removable battery

11. Samsung Galaxy S

Samsung

The phone that started it all, the Samsung Galaxy S (or Galaxy S1) seems laughable now when you check out the specs. A 1Ghz single-core chipset, 512MB of RAM, a 4-inch 480 x 800 screen. But this was pretty much as good as it got in the early days of Android, and it really was early. The biggest downsides were the uninspired design, gaudy software, and lack of a camera flash.

The good

  • Great browser back when Chrome wasn’t on mobile
  • As good as it got in terms of core specs

The bad

  • No camera flash
  • Battery life wasn’t fantastic
  • Dull design

10. Samsung Galaxy S2

Between the early nature of Android at the time and a general lack of polish, the Samsung Galaxy S1 fell just shy of greatness. Samsung’s second attempt in 2011, on the other hand, delivered one of the best Android phones to date. The Galaxy S2 offered a sturdy design, removable battery, an OLED screen, and brisk internals. An accomplished, important step in Samsung’s ascent to the top of the Android world, the only reason it isn’t higher on this list is that Samsung US and its network partners created so many variants (Samsung Galaxy S2 Epic 4G Touch, anyone?) that finding a true Galaxy S2 (the GT-I9100) was an almost Sisyphean task.

The good

  • Rear camera could compete with iPhone lineup
  • 2MP selfie camera when VGA or 1.3MP was the norm
  • Wide variety of video formats
  • OLED screen was pretty nifty

The bad

  • Mediocre battery life
  • A ton of variants that created marketplace confusion

9. Samsung Galaxy S4

The Galaxy S4 wasn’t just Samsung’s most popular Galaxy S series phone, it’s also the best selling Android phone of all time. But it also felt like the moment where Samsung jumped the shark. The main culprit here was TouchWiz, as Samsung usher in a ton of bloatware and took an “everything and the kitchen sink as well” approach to its own software additions. Do you really need page scrolling via a head tilt? Or the ability to create a 5.1 surround sound system with six phones? That’s not to say that it didn’t have any interesting software additions, like “bothies” (yes, way before Nokia) and Drama Shot, but be honest, did you ever use even these novel features more than once?

The good

  • Removable battery with microSD card slot
  • Good daytime picture quality
  • Great display

The bad

  • Bloated Android skin with many gimmicky features
  • Basically Galaxy S3.1 in terms of design
  • Low-light image quality paled in comparison to HTC One

8. Samsung Galaxy S20

It seems like for every couple of positives about the Galaxy S20 series, there’s a negative. You’re getting a ton of features in general, impressive hybrid zoom (and periscope zoom on the Ultra), a gorgeous 120Hz OLED screen, 5G, good battery life, and 8K recording. But you’re also getting a hefty price tag (from $1,000 to $1,400), gimmicky 100x Space Zoom, no proper telephoto camera on the S20 or S20 Plus, and a take on One UI that’s starting to suffer from feature creep like Samsung skins of old. This is also the first Samsung Galaxy S series that completely ditched the headphone jack. Boo. Nevertheless, these are still some of the best premium phones of 2020, and are worthy entries in Samsung’s ongoing smartphone dynasty.

The good

  • Class-leading screens
  • 8K recording with the ability to extract 33MP frames
  • 120Hz refresh rate
  • Versatile cameras
  • Good battery life

The bad

  • Disappointingly expensive pricing
  • Big performance gap between Snapdragon and Exynos variants
  • Zoom capabilities were overstated
  • No 3.5mm port
  • No Galaxy S20e

7. Samsung Galaxy S21

Robert Triggs / Android Authority

Samsung’s 2021 flagships go a long way towards fixing where the S20 series went wrong, but there are a few major missteps too. The Galaxy S21 series is $200 cheaper across the board, starting at $800 for the base S21 all the way to $1,200 for the S21 Ultra. The Ultra model is the star of the show here though, featuring two zoom-focused cameras (3X and 10X), S-Pen support, and a main camera that doesn’t suffer from major autofocus issues like the S20 Ultra. The series does have a few downsides, as the S21 has a plastic back while the S21 and S21 Plus both lack QHD+ screens. All three phones also ditch the in-box charger, microSD expansion, and don’t support ultra-fast charging. Still, the price drop combined with an upgraded Ultra model seems to have resulted in huge initial sales growth in the US.

The good

  • Good screens with high refresh rate
  • Great picture/video quality
  • Cheaper than S20 series
  • Two zoom cameras on Ultra model
  • S-Pen support for S21 Ultra
  • Exynos chipset narrows gap to Snapdragon SoC

The bad

  • No microSD card slot
  • S21 and S21 Plus ditch QHD+ screens
  • No in-box charger
  • Plastic back for Galaxy S21
  • S21 and S21 Plus don’t see camera/charging/battery changes over last year

6. Samsung Galaxy S9

The Galaxy S9 was essentially the Galaxy S8.1, which in turn shared some DNA with the Galaxy S7. It featured a similar glass design to the Galaxy S8, with lots of internal specs staying the same too. The Galaxy S series got a dual-camera setup for the first time, but this was restricted to the Galaxy S9 Plus. Other upgrades include native 960fps slow-motion recording, dual-aperture main cameras, and AR Emoji. The phones generally took a relatively safe approach at a time when rival Huawei dropped the innovative P20 Pro, and we saw plenty of more affordable flagships too. If we were just taking into account the Plus model, it’d rank above its direct predecessor, but as it is, the Galaxy S9 sits in a respectable place in the sixth spot.

The good

  • Super slow-mo could be cool
  • Fingerprint reader was in a more convenient location
  • Holy trifecta of a 3.5mm port, IP68, and wireless charging

The bad

  • Standard Galaxy S9 was gimped (no secondary rear camera, less RAM)
  • Design was an evolution of S8, which wasn’t a huge change over S7
  • Battery size didn’t see an increase over S8 series either
  • Dual aperture feature was interesting, but an evolutionary dead-end

5. Samsung Galaxy S8

The Samsung Galaxy S8 was the first with Bluetooth 5.0, kind of.

2017 saw the vast majority of phones adopting an 18:9 screen ratio or higher. The Galaxy S8 family was no exception. It delivered plenty more gorgeous OLED screen while still feeling easy to hold. Samsung’s early 2017 flagships also saw the debut of a variety of features, such as DeX, the Bixby voice assistant, the much-maligned Bixby button, and an iris scanner that wasn’t as terrible as many thought it was going to be. The same can’t be said of the rear fingerprint scanner, however. How did anyone think that sticking it next to the camera was a good idea? Nevertheless, after a rough few months following the exploding Note 7 debacle, the Galaxy S8 series was a timely reminder that Samsung was still the top dog.

The good

  • Improved photo quality due to multi-frame image processing
  • Fantastic design
  • DeX genuinely brought a PC-like experience to the table
  • 3D Touch home button was a great replacement for a physical button

The bad

  • No dual cameras when rivals had it for a year
  • Bixby button couldn’t be remapped at first
  • Fingerprint scanner location was awful
  • Average battery life

4. Samsung Galaxy S3

The Galaxy S/Galaxy S1 may have started the series and the Galaxy S2 may have shown us that Samsung’s camera team could compete with Apple, but the Galaxy S3 was the high point for the firm’s first few flagships. The Galaxy S3 delivered an interesting plastic design, a retooled, nature-themed TouchWiz UI with a few neat features (Smart Stay to keep the screen on, a popup video player), and speedy internals. Taken together, you had the range’s first real iPhone killer in terms of both sales and overall quality.

The good

  • Powerful internals
  • Removable battery and microSD support
  • Great camera
  • Some useful software additions

The bad

  • TouchWiz UX not as smooth as many other Android skins
  • Plastic design didn’t feel as premium as metal or glass

3. Samsung Galaxy S10

2019’s Galaxy S10 family had something for everyone, from the more affordable Galaxy S10e to the Galaxy S10 Plus with all the bells and whistles, and even a souped-up 5G model. This something-for-everyone approach resulted in some of the best Galaxy flagships ever. It also marked the first year of Samsung offering multiple cameras on all devices, a long-overdue move when the likes of LG, Huawei, and Xiaomi had dual cameras or more for a couple of years already. Toss in slick punch-hole designs, the debut of the One UI skin, and gorgeous OLED screens, and there was a lot to like here.

The good

  • Flexible camera setups on all models
  • Class-leading OLED screens
  • The Galaxy S10e with its great specs and price
  • Last Galaxy flagships with headphone jacks
  • IP68 rating and wireless charging

The bad

  • Cameras good but not great (especially at night)
  • 15W charging is slow compared to most rivals
  • In-display fingerprint scanner was hit-and-miss

2. Samsung Galaxy S5

Was 2014 the best ever year for smartphones? If it is, then some credit has to go to the Galaxy S5, which saw Samsung bringing its A game. The Galaxy S5 was the first mainline Galaxy flagship with water resistance, but it didn’t come at the expense of a removable battery or microSD support. This was also one of the first Samsung phones with 4K recording (following the Galaxy Note 3). Furthermore, the phone’s real-time HDR capability was a great addition at a time when HDR photography on most phones was still a slow, blurry mess. The only big disappointment was the swipe-based fingerprint scanner, which paled in comparison to the iPhone 5S’s touch-based scanner. A beloved phone that just misses out on the top spot by a hair.

The good

  • Water resistance
  • Removable battery and microSD support
  • Great image quality with real-time HDR

The bad

  • Swipe-based fingerprint scanner wasn’t as intuitive as touch-based scanners
  • MicroUSB port requires a plastic flap to seal against water damage

1. Samsung Galaxy S7

The best Galaxy S series of all-time addressed all of the Galaxy S6 series’ glaring issues, and boy did it fix a lot. Bigger batteries? Check. Water resistance? Yep. MicroSD expansion? Indeed. Otherwise, the Galaxy S7 series also delivered a similarly capable 12MP main camera, 240fps slow-mo (matching the iPhone), and speedy internals. A top seller and a textbook case of meaningful evolution and not just iteration for iteration’s sake, the Galaxy S7 also served as the antithesis of the iPhone range at the time. All hail the Galaxy S7.

The good

  • Water resistant design
  • Wireless charging
  • MicroSD expansion
  • Great photo/video quality

The bad

  • Glass design easily attracts fingerprints
  • MicroUSB when major rivals switched to USB-C

That’s it for our Samsung Galaxy S series rankings! Do you agree with the order? Let us know down below.

FeaturesSamsung, Samsung Galaxy S

Sours: https://www.androidauthority.com/samsung-galaxy-s-series-ranked-1124212/

Phones galaxy s

Samsung Galaxy S series

Series of Android smartphones in the Samsung Galaxy series

The Samsung Galaxy S logo until 2015

The Samsung Galaxy S series is a line of high-end Androidmobile devices produced by Samsung Electronics. Together with the Samsung Galaxy Note, the lineup serves as Samsung's flagship smartphone model.

The series consisted initially of smartphones and the first device, the Samsung Galaxy S, was announced in March 2010 and released for sale in June of that year. Samsung later expanded the Galaxy S line to tablet computers with the announcement of the Galaxy Tab S in June 2014 and released the next month. As of January 2021, the latest smartphones in the Galaxy S series are the Samsung Galaxy S21 series, which were first released in January 2021. The Samsung Galaxy Tab series is the related tablet line, which includes the tablet Samsung Galaxy Tab S7 released in August 2020.

Phones[edit]

Main article: Comparison of Samsung Galaxy S smartphones

Samsung Galaxy S[edit]

The original Samsung Galaxy S smartphone was announced in March 2010 and released on June 4, 2010.

  • Display: 4.0" Super AMOLED display with 480x800 pixel resolution
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 3
  • Storage: 2-16 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 512 MB
  • Battery: 1500 mAh (user-replaceable)
  • Back Camera: 5 megapixels
  • Front Camera: 0.3 megapixels
  • Back Cover is replaceable.
  • Extra Storage Type: Micro SD Card (only 1-2 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S2[edit]

The company announced the Samsung Galaxy S2 on February 13, 2011.

Samsung Galaxy S3[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy S3 was announced on May 3, 2012. It features a multiwindow feature whereby users can use two apps simultaneously (available from Android 4.1 “Premium Suite Upgrade”),[1] an "Ambient Light" feature whereby the screen brightness can automatically adjust to the light level, a "Smart Stay" feature that can prevent the phone's screen from turning off by looking at the phone,[2] a personal assistant called S Voice,[3] the ability to tag faces in the phone's gallery,[4] an "S Beam" feature to transfer files via NFC,[5] an LED light on the front of the phone that can be used for notifications, a "Motion Gestures" feature whereby users can accomplish tasks by moving the phone,[6] and color point effects for the camera.[7]

The Galaxy S3 is the first Samsung mobile phone with wireless charging support that can be enabled using a special back cover that connects to dedicated pins under the rear cover.[8]

Like its predecessor, its rear camera has eight megapixels (3264×2448) and 1080p video recording, though the S3 adds stereo audio recording, as well as the ability to simultaneously capture 6 megapixel (3264×1836) photos while filming, which is the image sensor's highest 16:9 aspect ratio crop. The front camera's video resolution has increased from 480p to 720p.[9]

  • Display: 4.8" Super AMOLED display with 720x1280 pixel resolution
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 4 Quad, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 MSM8960, or Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 MSM8228
  • Storage: 16, 32, or 64 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 1 GB (S3 GT-i9300), 1.5 GB (S3 Neo GT-i9301), or 2 GB (S3 LTE GT-i9305)
  • Battery: 2100 mAh (user-replaceable)
  • FM radio receiver (GT-i9300 only)

Samsung Galaxy S4[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy S4 was announced by Samsung on March 14, 2013. New features that this model has compared to its predecessor include:

  • an infrared blaster that allows the phone to be a universal remote control[10][11]
  • a "Smart.Program" feature that pauses videos when nobody is looking at the screen[12]
  • a "Smart Rotation" feature whereby the screen rotation blocks itself by detecting the user's face[13]
  • a "Smart Scroll" feature whereby webpages automatically scroll by tilting the head or device[14]
  • a "Story Album" feature[15]
  • a barometer to measure the altitude level[16]
  • the ability to measure the ambient temperature[16]
  • the ability to measure the ambient humidity percentage[16]
  • a one-handed mode (available via update)[17]
  • the ability to increase the sensitivity for usage with gloves[18]
  • an "Air View" feature that allows information to be shown by hovering the screen without touching it[19]
  • an "Air Gesture" feature" whereby users can control the device by moving the hand over the phone[20]
  • the option to adapt the phone to an optimal display[21] and optimal sound[22]
  • the ability to take a photo and record up to nine seconds of sound[23]
  • the ability to take a fast-motion photo and make a repeat effect[24]
  • the ability to take a photo and animate it[25]
  • the ability to erase parts of a photo.[26]
  • the ability to capture photos and record video simultaneously from both rear and front cameras, though stored picture-in-picture rather than in separate video tracks within a file or separate files; the camera order can be swapped while recording.[27][28]

Besides the Galaxy Note 3, the Galaxy S4 is the only Samsung mobile phone to be equipped with thermometer and hygrometer sensors.

Some praised the innovation inherent in all of the Galaxy S4's new features,[29] while others criticized it as feature creep.[30]

The resolution of the main (rear) camera was increased to 13 megapixels, and it is able to capture 9.6 megapixel photographs during video recording at 1080p. The front camera has 2.1 megapixels and its video resolution was increased to 1080p. Optional location-based contextual file names can facilitate later browsing.[31][32]

More than 80 million units of the Galaxy S4 were sold, making it the most sold Android-powered mobile phone of all time.[33]

Its variants are the rugged and water-resistant S4 Active, the lower-priced mid-class S4 Mini', as well as the hybrid Samsung Galaxy S4 Zoom, which is equipped with an optical zoom lens with 10× magnification, more powerful Xenon flash, tripod mount, and rotary knob lens ring, combining a mobile phone with a dedicated digital camera.

Samsung Galaxy S5[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy S5 was announced on February 24, 2014. It improves upon the Galaxy S4 by adding a heart rate monitor,[34] IP67 water resistance,[35] a fingerprint scanner,[36] the ability to record 4K videos (2160p at 30fps) and 1080p at twice the frame rate (60 fps),[37]phase-detection autofocus which is faster than previously used contrast detection, the ability to take better photos in low light levels,[38] a "Download Booster" feature to increase download levels to the maximum bandwidth allowed,[39] the ability to restrict the usage of battery by limiting the phone's usage,[40] and USB 3.0.[41] It lacks the thermometer (temperature) sensor, hygrometer (humidity) sensor, and "Story Album" features from the preceding Galaxy S4.

The Galaxy S5 is the first Samsung mobile phone where the touch key on the left side of the home button is a task key instead of an option key.

It is the last mobile phone in the Galaxy S series to be equipped with a user-replaceable battery. The Galaxy S5 is the last mobile phone in the Galaxy S series with a micro-SIM card; later phones use a nano-SIM card.[42][43]

Since the Galaxy S5, the model number (e.g. ) is no longer displayed on the boot screen.[44]

Samsung Galaxy S6[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy S6 series consists of four phones: the Samsung Galaxy S6, the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge, the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ and the Samsung Galaxy S6 Active. Samsung first announced the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 edge on March 1, 2015. On August 13, 2015, Samsung announced the Galaxy S6 edge+, along with the Galaxy Note5. The Galaxy S6 series improves upon its predecessors by adding the ability to quickly charge the phone with up to 15 watts using Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0,[45] virtual reality (compatible with the Galaxy Gear VR), a "Smart Manager" feature,[46] and the ability to customize the interface with themes.[47] It also features a new metal and glass build.

Feature removals

The Galaxy S6 series removes several features, including some long-term key features, from its predecessors, such as the microSD card slot, Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) support, water protection, Air Gesture control, Air View, Smart Pause, Smart Rotation, Smart Scroll, the one-handed operation mode, increased sensitivity of the capacitive touch screen for use with gloves, and USB 3.0 support. In addition, the batteries in the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 edge are smaller than the battery in the Galaxy S5, and are not replaceable by end users.

Justin Denison, then vice president of product strategy at Samsung, stated on stage at the Unpacked 2015 Episode 1 keynote event that they had opted for a built-in battery now that "consumers could feel confident in charging their phones".[48][49] The previous year, a Samsung commercial for the Galaxy S5 had mocked the iPhones' non-replaceable batteries, referring to iPhone users as "wall huggers", citing their incessant dependence on wall charging.[50]

Camera

It is the first main model phone to feature optical image stabilization on the rear camera and also improves upon it with the brighter f/1.9 aperture that enables improved low-light performance for both photography and video recording, the first Samsung phone with a dedicated camera quick launcher (home button double-press) and also the first Samsung flagship device to capture slow motion video with audio and original framerate (120 frames per second) which can be edited in a precluded editor software accessible through the gallery software.[51]

Other

The Galaxy S6 is the first mobile phone in the Galaxy S series with a nano-SIM card; earlier Galaxy phones use a micro-SIM card or "standard" (mini-SIM) card.[42][43]

The S6 Edge Plus, being released simultaneously with the Galaxy Note 5, is not equipped with an infrared transmitter for use as a remote control.

  • Display: 5.1" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2560 pixel resolution (Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 edge); 5.7" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2560 pixel resolution (Galaxy S6 edge+)
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 7 Octa 7420
  • Storage: 32, 64, or 128 GB
  • RAM: 3 GB (Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 edge); 4 GB (Galaxy S6 edge+)
  • Battery: 2550 mAh (Galaxy S6); 2600 mAh (Galaxy S6 edge); 3000 mAh (Galaxy S6 edge+), 3500 mAh (Galaxy S6 Active) (non-replaceable)

Samsung Galaxy S7[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy S7 series, which consists of the Samsung Galaxy S7, the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge and the Samsung Galaxy S7 Active, was announced on February 21, 2016. They improve upon the Galaxy S6 by adding an always-on display to optionally show information while the screen is off,[52] a "Dual Pixel" camera feature for faster autofocus,[53] improved low-light photos,[54] and IP68 water resistance.[55] (The Galaxy S5 had IP67 water resistance; however, the Galaxy S6 lacked this feature.) It also includes a microSD card reader,[56] which had been present on the Galaxy S5 and earlier iterations of the Galaxy S line but was not present on the Galaxy S6. However, the IR blaster was removed from the Galaxy S7.[57]

Camera

The camera in the Galaxy S7 has 12 megapixels,[58] down from the Galaxy S6's 16 megapixels to achieve a larger pixel size on the image sensor, enabling it to capture more light under the same conditions.

Its rear camera aperture of f/1.7 was the then brightest aperture on any mobile phone camera. Its front camera, although having the same resolution as the Galaxy S6's one (2592×1944 photo; 2560×1440p video), has a brighter f/1.7 aperture as well, compared to the f/1.9 on the Galaxy S6.

The five-minute time limitation for 2160p video present in preceding devices has been removed.[59]

Storage
In the United States and some European markets, only the lowest storage option of 32 GB was shipped, meaning that the internal storage capacity has only doubled in the 7 years since the 2009 Samsung i8000 Omnia II flagship which available with up to 16 GB.[60]
  • Display: 5.1" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2560 pixel resolution (Galaxy S7); 5.5" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2560 pixel resolution (Galaxy S7 edge)
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 8890 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
  • Storage: 32, 64, or 128 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • Battery: 3000 mAh (Galaxy S7); 3600 mAh (Galaxy S7 edge) (non-replaceable)

Samsung Galaxy S8[edit]

Samsung announced the Samsung Galaxy S8 and Samsung Galaxy S8+ smartphones on March 27, 2017. They feature an iris scanner, which was not present on the Galaxy S7 phones. S Voice has also been replaced by Bixby. In addition, the microUSB port has been replaced by a USB-C port, and the physical home button and capacitive buttons have been replaced by on-screen keys.

  • Display: 5.8" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2960 pixel resolution (Galaxy S8); 6.2" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2960 pixel resolution (Galaxy S8+).
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 8895 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 835
  • Storage: 64 or 128 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 4 or 6 GB
  • Battery: 3000 mAh (Galaxy S8); 3500 mAh (Galaxy S8+) (non-replaceable)
  • Colors: Midnight Black, Orchid Gray, Coral Blue, Arctic Silver, or Maple Gold[61]

Samsung Galaxy S9[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy S9 and Samsung Galaxy S9+ were unveiled on February 25, 2018 at the Mobile World Congress, with an improved camera, redesigned back panel and improved internals. The fingerprint scanner on the back is relocated to below the rear-facing camera, and the earpiece becomes an additional speaker for stereo sound.

The Galaxy S9 is the first flagship phone by Samsung to support recording 2160p (4K) at 60 frames per second (twice as much as the preceding Galaxy S5 to S8), 1080p at 240 frames per second (four times as much as the S5 to S8) and super slow motion at 960 frames per second for a limited duration.[62][63] The first two frame rates are the first increase in the series since the 2014 Samsung Galaxy S5.

Its camera has a variable aperture which can switch between f/1.5 and f/2.4, making it the first mobile phone since the 2009 Nokia N86 with a variable aperture camera.[64][65] A subsequent software update retrofitted the feature of warning the user about flaws in photographs such as blinking eyes and blur, which was first implemented on the Galaxy Note 9.[66]

  • Display: 5.8" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2960 pixel resolution (Galaxy S9); 6.2" Super AMOLED display with 1440x2960 pixel resolution (Galaxy S9+).
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 9810 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 845
  • Storage: 64, 128 or 256 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 4 GB (Galaxy S9); 6 GB (Galaxy S9+)
  • Battery: 3000 mAh (Galaxy S9); 3500 mAh (Galaxy S9+) (non-replaceable)
  • Colors: Lilac Purple, Midnight Black, Titanium Gray, Coral Blue, Sunrise Gold, Burgundy Red, and Polaris Blue[67]
  • Video recording: 2160p (4K) at 60fps, 1080p at 240 fps (with audio), 720p at 960 fps (short duration slow motion)[68]

Samsung Galaxy S10 Series[edit]

Samsung announced the Samsung Galaxy S10 series, consisting of the Samsung Galaxy S10e, Samsung Galaxy S10, Samsung Galaxy S10+ and Samsung Galaxy S10 5G, on February 20, 2019. In January 2020, the Galaxy S10 Lite was released, a mid-range variant of the S10 containing the same cameras and performance but with lower features.

The charging rates above 15 watts supported by the S10 5G and S10 Lite are the first increase on Samsung flagship smartphones since the 2014 Samsung Galaxy Note 4.[69]

Samsung Galaxy S10e

  • Display: 5.8" Dynamic AMOLED
  • Resolution: 2280 × 1080 pixels (435 ppi)
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 9820 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
  • Storage: 128 GB / 256 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 6 GB / 8 GB
  • Battery: 3,100 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: Side-mounted Fingerprint Sensor, Dual Rear Cameras, Infinity-O Display, HDR-10 Video Recording, Reverse Wireless Charging (Qi-certified)
  • Price: $749 (128 GB), $849 (256 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S10

  • Display: 6.1" Dynamic AMOLED
  • Resolution: 3040 × 1440 pixels (551 ppi)
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 9820 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
  • Storage: 128 GB / 512 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • Battery: 3,400 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor, Triple Rear Cameras, Infinity-O Display, HDR-10 Video Recording, Reverse Wireless Charging (Qi-certified)
  • Price: $899 (128 GB), $1,149 (512 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S10+

  • Display: 6.4" Dynamic AMOLED
  • Resolution: 3040 × 1440 pixels (526 ppi)
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 9820 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
  • Storage: 128 GB / 512 GB / 1 TB (expandable)
  • RAM: 8 GB / 12 GB
  • Battery: 4,100 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor, Triple Rear Cameras, Dual Front Cameras, Infinity-O Display, HDR-10 Video Recording, Reverse Wireless Charging (Qi-certified)
  • Price: $999 (128 GB), $1,249 (512 GB), $1,599 (1 TB)

Samsung Galaxy S10 5G

  • Display: 6.7" Dynamic AMOLED
  • Resolution: 3040 × 1440 pixels
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 9820 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
  • Storage: 256 GB / 512 GB (non-expandable)
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • Battery: 4,500 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor, Quad Rear Cameras, Dual Front Cameras, Infinity-O Display, HDR-10 Video Recording, Reverse Wireless Charging (Qi-certified)
  • Price: $1,299 (256 GB), $1,399 (512 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S10 Lite

  • Display: 6.7" Super AMOLED
  • Resolution: 2400 × 1080 pixels
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
  • Storage: 128 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 6/8 GB
  • Battery: 4,500 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: Optical Fingerprint Sensor, Triple Rear Cameras, Infinity-O Display, HDR-10 Video Recording, 25 W Super Fast Charging
  • Price: €649 (128 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S20 Series[edit]

Samsung announced the Samsung Galaxy S20 series, consisting of the Samsung Galaxy S20, Samsung Galaxy S20+ and Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, on February 11, 2020. In October 2020, the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE was released, a mid-range variant of the S20 containing similar cameras and performance but with lower features. Other versions in the series include the Samsung Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition.

The S20 series are the first Samsung mobile phones with 8K video recording (7680×4320p), excluding the S20 FE.

Samsung Galaxy S20[edit]

  • Display: 6.2" Dynamic AMOLED
  • Resolution: 3200 × 1440 pixels
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 990 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 865
  • Storage: 128 GB
  • RAM: 8 GB (4G LTE) / 12 GB (5G)
  • Battery: 4,000 mAh
  • Introduced Features: 8K Video Recording, 120 Hz refresh rate, Triple Rear Cameras, Infinity-O Display, HDR10 Video Recording, USB 3.2, 5G Connectivity, 25 W Super Fast Charging
  • Price: €899 (4G LTE), $999/€999 (5G)

Samsung Galaxy S20+[edit]

  • Display: 6.7" Dynamic AMOLED
  • Resolution: 3200 × 1440 pixels
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 990 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 865
  • Storage: 128 (4G LTE/5G) / 256 (5G) GB
  • RAM: 8 GB (4G LTE) / 12 GB (5G)
  • Battery: 4,500 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: 8K Video Recording, 120 Hz refresh rate, Quad Rear Cameras, 3D Depth Camera, Infinity-O Display, HDR10 Video Recording, USB 3.2, 5G Connectivity, 25 W Super Fast Charging
  • Price: €999 (4G LTE), $1,199/€1,099 (5G 128 GB), $1,299/€1,249 (5G 512 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra[edit]

  • Display: 6.9" Dynamic AMOLED
  • Resolution: 3200 × 1440 pixels
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 990 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 865
  • Storage: 128/256/512 GB
  • RAM: 12/16 GB
  • Battery: 5,000 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: 8K Video Recording, 120 Hz refresh rate, Triple Rear Cameras, 3D Depth Camera, Infinity-O Display, HDR10 Video Recording, USB 3.2, 5G Connectivity, 45W Super Fast Charging
  • Price: $1,399/€1,349 (128 GB), $1,599/€1,549 (512 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE[edit]

  • Display: 6.5" Super AMOLED
  • Resolution: 2400 × 1080 pixels
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 990 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 865
  • Storage: 128/256 GB
  • RAM: 6/8 GB
  • Battery: 4,500 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Introduced Features: 120 Hz refresh rate, 8MP Telephoto Camera, Triple Rear Cameras, Infinity-O Display, HDR10 Video Recording, Wi-Fi 6, 5G Connectivity, 25W Super Fast Charging
  • Price: $699 (128 GB), $749 (256 GB)

Samsung Galaxy S21 Series[edit]

Samsung announced the Samsung Galaxy S21 series, consisting of the Samsung Galaxy S21, Samsung Galaxy S21+ and Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra, on January 14, 2021. These smartphones lack the expandable storage of the Galaxy S20 series but are the first S Series Lineup to feature 5G models only during launch. 4G variants of the Samsung Galaxy S21, S21+ and S21 Ultra may come in a later date.

Samsung Galaxy S21[edit]

  • Display: 6.2" Dynamic AMOLED 2X
  • Resolution: 2400 × 1080 pixels (FHD+)
  • Bluetooth 5.2
  • All models with 5G
  • Processor: Samsung Exynos 2100 or Qualcomm Snapdragon 888
  • Storage: 128 GB / 256 GB
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • Battery: 4000 mAh (non-replaceable)

Samsung Galaxy S21 Plus[edit]

Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra[edit]

Samsung Galaxy S22 Series[edit]

Release: 2021-2025 Number of cameras:3 Size:6.9

Tablets[edit]

Main article: Samsung Galaxy Tab series

Samsung Galaxy Tab S[edit]

Main articles: Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 and Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5

the first generation Galaxy Tab, The Samsung Galaxy Tab S was announced on 12 June 2014. The tablet comes in two sizes, a 8.4-inch version and a 10.5-inch version.

  • Display: 8.4" Super AMOLED display with 1600x2560 pixel resolution (8.4-inch version); 10.5" Super AMOLED display with 1600x2560 pixel resolution (10.5-inch version)
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 (both versions), Samsung Exynos 5 Octa 5420 (both versions), or Samsung Exynos 5 Octa 5433 (10.5-inch version)
  • Storage: 16 or 32 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 3 GB

Samsung Galaxy Tab S2[edit]

Main articles: Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 8.0 and Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7

Samsung announced the Galaxy Tab S2 series on 20 July 2015. It comes in two sizes, an 8.0-inch version and a 9.7-inch version.

  • Display: 8.0" Super AMOLED display with 1536x2048 pixel resolution (8.0-inch version); 9.7" Super AMOLED display with 1536x2048 pixel resolution (9.7-inch version)
  • Storage: 32 or 64 GB (expandable)

Samsung Galaxy Tab S3[edit]

Main article: Samsung Galaxy Tab S3

Samsung announced the Galaxy Tab S3 on 26 February 2017. Unlike the Galaxy Tab S and Galaxy Tab S2, the Galaxy Tab S3 only comes in one size, a 9.7-inch model.

  • Display: 9.7" Super AMOLED display with 1536x2048 pixel resolution
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
  • Storage: 32 or 128 GB (expandable)
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • Battery: 6000 mAh (non-replaceable)

Samsung Galaxy Tab S4[edit]

Main article: Samsung Galaxy Tab S4

The Galaxy Tab S4 was announced on 1 August 2018. It features a larger 10.5-inch display with slimmer bezels, and facial and iris scanning.

  • Display: 10.5-inch 2560x1600 Super AMOLED
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 835
  • Storage: 64 or 256 GB (expandable up to 400 GB)
  • Memory: 4 GB
  • Battery: 7300 mAh (non-replaceable)

Samsung Galaxy Tab S5e[edit]

Samsung announced the Galaxy Tab S5e on 15 February 2019.[70]

  • Display: 10.5-inch 2560x1600 Super AMOLED
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 670
  • Storage: 64 or 128 GB (expandable up to 512 GB)
  • Memory: 4 or 6 GB
  • Battery: 7040 mAh (non-replaceable)

Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 (2019)[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 was announced on 31 July 2019.

  • Display: 10.5-inch 2560x1600 Super AMOLED
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
  • Storage: 128/256 GB (expandable up to 512 GB)
  • Memory: 6/8 GB
  • Battery: 7,040 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Rear Camera: 13 MP wide + 5 MP ultra-wide
  • Front Camera: 8 MP
  • Dimensions: 244.5 × 159.5 × 5.7 mm
  • Weight: 420 grams
  • Price: Starts at $649.99 (Depends on where you buy the device.)

Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 Lite (2020)[edit]

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 Lite was announced on 16 April 2020.

  • Display: 10.4-inch 2000x1200 TFT LCD
  • Processor: Exynos 9611
  • Storage: 64/128 GB (expandable up to 1 TB)
  • Memory: 4 GB
  • Battery: 7,040 mAh (non-replaceable)
  • Rear Camera: 8 MP
  • Front Camera: 5 MP
  • Dimensions: 244.5 × 154.3 × 7.0 mm
  • Weight: 465 grams

Samsung Galaxy Tab S7 (2020)[edit]

Main article: Samsung Galaxy Tab S7

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S7 was announced on 5 August 2020.[71]

  • Display: 11-inch 2560 × 1600 liquid crystal display
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 865+
  • Storage: 128/256/512 GB (expandable)
  • Memory: 6/8 GB
  • Battery: 8000 mAh (Non Removable)
  • Rear Camera: 13+5 MP
  • Front Camera: 8 MP
  • Dimensions: 253.8 × 165.3 × 6.3 mm
  • Speaker: Quad Stereo Speakers,tuned by AKG
  • Audio Jack: USB Type-C
  • Weight: 498 grams
  • Price: Starts at $649.99

Samsung Galaxy Tab S7+ (2020)[edit]

Main article: Samsung Galaxy Tab S7+

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S7+ was announced on 5 August 2020.[71]

  • Display: 12.4-inch 2800 × 1752 Super AMOLED
  • Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 865+
  • Storage: 128/256/512 GB (expandable)
  • Memory: 6/8 GB
  • Battery: 10090 mAh (Non Removable)
  • Rear Camera: 13+5 MP
  • Front Camera: 8 MP
  • Dimensions: 285 × 185 × 5.7 mm
  • Speaker: Quad Stereo Speakers,tuned by AKG
  • Audio Jack: USB Type-C
  • Weight: 575 grams
  • Price: Starts at $849.99

See also[edit]

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External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung_Galaxy_S_series
Galaxy A52s 5G - Samsung Please Do Better !

There was a lot of sperm, and when the guy began to pull out his penis, his mouth quickly filled, and hot foamy liquid flowed from his. Lips. - Oh, how lovely you are. The dragon sat down relaxed on the bed and looked with satisfaction at the trembling, powerless girl, with closed eyes and parted mouth.

From which his sperm flowed.

Similar news:

He asked after a pause - you have not finished. - I succeed only from above - answered Katya - so not this time. Mark wiped himself off with a napkin and lay on his back. His cock was swinging, not as hard as before, but quite ready for a fight.



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