Bathymetry san francisco bay

Bathymetry san francisco bay DEFAULT

Bathymetric Map San Francisco / Bay Area, California (Small)

Extremely accurate bathymetric map of San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay and surrounding area. A shallow, productive estuary, San Francisco Bay connects the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers with the Pacific Ocean. Gathering the rainfall and snowmelt from an enormous watershed, these outflows drain approximately 40% of California into the bay, which then flows out (under the Golden Gate Bridge) into the Pacific Ocean. It&#;s the largest Pacific estuary in the Americas and, despite significant mining- and construction-related damage over the past century, it remains a rich part of the coast&#;s ecosystem.

During the last ice age, the basin was actually above sea-level. It was a large valley, filled with small hills similar to those found along the coast of California today. When the sheets of ice melted, the sea level rose approximately feet, filled the valley, turned it into a bay, and the small hills became islands.

This three dimensional map is carved from Baltic birch wood, framed and has a acrylic covering to protect the wood. Professional cartographers are used in the creation of each individual chart in order to insure the utmost accuracy. Some maps come in two sizes in order to fit virtually any area in the home, office or boat. We have charts from areas across the U.S. available on a drop ship basis. This is a great item at an unbelievable price. If you are searching for a particular area, please call or email.

The color will differ slightly with both the frame and background as each of the maps are hand stained and may vary from the picture.

Out of stock

Sours: https://www.scrimshawgallery.com/product/bathymetric-map-san-francisco-bay-area-small/

San Francisco Bay Bathymetry

Science Center Objects

Bathymetry of a dynamic tidal estuary, such as San Francisco Bay, provides the observable linkage between anthropogenic modifications of the landscape—such as evolving land use practices, flood control, and water diversions—and natural forces of climate-driven river flow, sea level change, tides, and wind. By examining our record of hydrographic surveys, spanning over years, we can gain insights into the probable effect of future modification including efforts toward restoration.

In addition to historical change analysis, current bathymetry is critical for the calibration and interpretation of hydrodynamic and ecological models. Mass balance and sheer stress are driven by bathymetry—even ecological niches are influenced by bathymetry (depth, turbidity, particle size, light, turbulence, etc.).

Here, we provide information about the bathymetric data available for San Francisco Bay.

Methods

An illustration of a bay that shows water depth.

In the example sequence shown below, the first step in the preparation of regular grids displayed on this web site begins with irregular hydrographic survey data (soundings) that have been corrected to a common datum (1).

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the primary resource for obtaining these original soundings. Other agencies, including the US Army Corps of Engineers, California Department of Water Resources, US Bureau of Reclamation, and the USGS, have contributed local studies. Once the soundings are in hand they are contoured, and shoreline and marsh perimeters are added and combined into a geographic information system (GIS) (2).

All data layers must be adjusted to a common horizontal and vertical datum and all depths must have the same orientation and units. At this point a grid can be generated.

Quality control is an iterative process, performed on the resulting grid by comparing it with the original soundings (34).

Errors are computed, plotted and repaired when appropriate. Errors are usually a result of incorrect unit tags on the source data or digitizing mistakes, but some are due to gradients in bathymetry that cannot be resolved by a single grid cell.

The final grid (5) can be adjusted to a different tidal datum using an adjustment grid.

This grid is produced by assigning tide levels observed at shore stations to co-tidal lines from the TRIM-2D model (67).

Schematics show the process and methods used to process and create maps from water depth data.

San Francisco Bay bathymetry methods

  1. Obtain the most recent published depth soundings and shoreline data
  2. Plot soundings and contour soundings. The South Bay figure here contains over , points and depth-colored contours.
  3. On closer examination we can see the individual points and identify inconsistencies. This figure shows depth contours with colored, labeled soundings.
  4. Check for errors. Here is an example where incorrect depth codes were assigned to shallow water soundings. A depth code for meters was assigned, the soundings were actually decimeters.
  5. Final grid produced using the ArcInfo command Topogrid.
  6. Datum adjustments for Mean Sea Level (MSL), Mean Higher-High Water (MHHW), National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD). Since the adjustment for various tidal and non-tidal datums is not constant or is a simple function of distance, we use cotidal contours developed by the TRIM model. In this figure the cotidal contours are shown.
  7. Based on the tide records at stations around the perimeter of the Bay we can assign adjustment values to these cotidal contours and produce an adjustment grid. The example given here is the adjustment grid for Mean Lower-Low Water (MLLW) to MHHW.

Geostatistics

Using this m grid cell representation of the Bay we can compute some primary geomorphic features of the basin--such as surface area and volume--for a given tidal datum, and compare these and other statistical properties in the sub-basins of San Francisco Bay.

A graph showing depth versus cell count.
Map shows the separate basins of San Francisco Bay and their names.

Full Bay

TIDAL DATUMVOLUME (Mm3)SURFACE AREA (Mm2)AVG. DEPTH
VOL/AREA (m)
MEDIAN DEPTH (m)
MLLW
MSL
MHHW

Properties based on the Mean Sea Level grid

PROPERTYSOUTH BAYCENTRAL BAYSAN PABLO BAYSUISUN BAY
Area (Mm2)
Volume (Mm3)
Average depth (m)
Median depth (m)
% Area
< 5 m
69328257

Bathymetry Change

As described in our METHODS section, a continuous surface representation of each bathymetric survey was created using Topogrid, an Arc/Info module that utilizes sounding and contour information to create a hydrodynamically correct surface. Input data was a combination of point soundings and hand-drawn depth contours (see table below). Once a bathymetric surface has been created for each hydrographic survey, the surfaces are adjusted to a common datum and we compute change or difference grids. These new ‘change’ surfaces identify areas of erosion and deposition.

Here is an example difference map of San Pablo Bay (). During this period there was massive sediment accumulation related to hydraulic gold mining.

The data supporting historical change analysis is quite extensive. The following tables summarize the survey dates, digitized soundings, and contours used to produce the bathymetric surfaces and difference maps for San Francisco Bay.

SUISUN BAY
SURVEY YEARNUMBER OF SOUNDINGSCONTOUR INTERVALS (ft)
18,-4, 0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90
21,-4, 0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90
17,-4, 0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90
36,-4, 0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90
93,-1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45 (meters)
SAN PABLO BAY
SURVEY YEARNUMBER OF SOUNDINGSCONTOUR INTERVALS (ft)
0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 42, 48, 60
-1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 12, 24, 30, 36, 48, 60
0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 60
42,-1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60
62,0, 6, 12, 30, 48
65,0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 36, 60
CENTRAL BAY
SURVEY YEARNUMBER OF SOUNDINGSCONTOUR INTERVALS (ft)
21,0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90, , , ,
,0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90, , , , ,
48,0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90,
,0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90, , , ,
,0, 6, 12, 18, 30, 60, 90, , , , ,
SOUTH BAY
SURVEY YEARNUMBER OF SOUNDINGSCONTOUR INTERVALS (ft)
20,0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 50, 60, 70
99,0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 50, 60, 70, 80
92,0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 50, 60, 70, 80
,0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 50, 60, 70, 80
,0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 50, 60, 70, 80
~ million0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 50, 60, 70, 80

Official Publications

Animations of change for North Bay

A series of illustrations showing water depth in a bay are shown in sequence to show how depth changed over time.

By linear interpolation, we can compute sedimentation maps for years between surveys and combine the maps to produce an animation of sedimentation for the North Bay. This animation gives an overall view of the system in time and space. We can see that, in the more active channels of Suisun Bay, surface sediment is deposited and erodes quickly in response to changing flows (floods/drought) and modifications (such as dredging the southern channel or long term mooring of the mothball fleet).

We assume:

  1. the sediment deposited in North San Francisco Bay between and was dominated by hydraulic mining debris;
  2. erosion observed in subsequent surveys was not re-deposited locally; and
  3. material deposited after was not mining debris.

Making these assumptions, we can predict the location and thickness of the original hydraulic mining debris. It is especially notable that the mercury employed in gold mining in the Sierra Nevada was refined liquid quicksilver or elemental mercury; this is a form of mercury much more likely to foster net methylation than is cinnabar, the form of mercury in most mercury mines. Approximately 10, tonnes of refined mercury were lost to the watershed during the Gold Rush mining era. Much of the mercury consumed by gold mining could have been incorporated into the 12 billion cubic meters of sediments extracted by the mining activities and released to the rivers of the Bay-Delta watershed. The mercury-laced hydraulic mining debris was ultimately transported to the bay-delta; it is known that large deposits of hydraulic mining debris remain in bay sediments. These wastes formed marshes, islands, or filled or diked marsh, or were deposited in shallow waters. Under the right circumstances this mercury contamination is transported through the food chain and concentrated in some commercial and sport fish. Human consumption of fish caught in the Bay is already restricted because of mercury contamination. Specifically, adults are advised to limit consumption of sport fish from the Bay to two times a month; pregnant or nursing women and children 6 or under should limit consumption to one time a month. Large shark and striped bass from the Bay should not be consumed at all. As we study the feasibility of restoration of marshes that were sinks for mining debris, the possibility of releasing mercury to the Bay must be considered.

Animations of mining debris deposition and subsequent erosion

A series of maps show how the bottom of a bay changes through time.
A series of illustrations of sediment coverage on a bay floor through time show how sediment depth changed.

Status - Completed

Sours: https://www.usgs.gov/centers/pcmsc/science/san-francisco-bay-bathymetry
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SFML Logo


Data presented here include a series of remotely sensed images (multibeam, side scan sonar), derived data (bathymetric contours, grid analyses, etc.), habitat analyses, associated data sets (survey footprints, coastline), and FGDC metadata, grouped by survey location. To download zipped data files from the tables, click on the Data Type name under the desired survey location. Data are presented in ESRI ArcGIS format (shapefiles, grids). Multibeam and sidescan images are Geotiffs. These data are NOT to be used for navigational purposes.

For general data searches, use the SURVEY LOCATION LIST or MAP LOCATOR

Please review our Data Use Policy

Data Format

File Size MB
(zipped)

Data Footprint Preview

CA Geology Series- Continental Margin  

Shapefile, polygon

47

CA Geology Series Project MXDCA Geology Series ProjectArcGIS(), mxd

47

Habitat code / Geologic unit keys 

San Francisco Bay (mouth)- All

GeoTiff

29

GeoTiff

59

Shapefile, polygon

11

SF_north_xyz XYZ files available here

TXT

G

Fledermaus files available here

.sd, Iview3D viewer

G

San Francisco Bay (mouth)- Entrance Channel ()

   

GeoTiff

11

GeoTiff

25

GeoTiff

49

GeoTiff

GRID

21

TXT

63

TXT

63

.sd, Iview3D viewer

San Francisco Bay (mouth)- North

   

GeoTiff

11

GeoTiff

25

GeoTiff

49

GeoTiff

GeoTiff

GeoTiff

GeoTiff

77

GRID

 

San Francisco Bay (mouth)- South

   

GeoTiff

8

GeoTiff

18

GeoTiff

34

SF_sw_1m_clr Shaded Relief Image,color (1m-southwest)

GeoTiff

GeoTiff

7

GeoTiff

15

GeoTiff

33

GeoTiff

70

GeoTiff

GeoTiff

GeoTiff

90

GRID

West Bay (), San Francisco Bay
  

GeoTiff

12

GeoTiff

30

GeoTiff

43

GeoTiff

GRID

84

GRID

24

TXT

TXT

63

.sd, Iview3D viewer

Shapefile, point

26

West Bay (vicinity of Angel Island)

  

GeoTiff

35

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m)

GRID

74

TXT

44

.sd, iview4D viewer

48

San Francisco Bay Shallow Water Backscatter and Bathymetry Mapping
 
Presidio Shoals, San Francisco Bay
 

GeoTiff

3

GeoTiff

6

GeoTiff

45

GRID

17

Shapefile, line

<1

Shapefile, polygon

<1

Shapefile, point

<1

TXT

17

.sd, Iview3D viewer

24

San Pablo Bay

GeoTiff

14

GeoTiff

33

GeoTiff

GRID

27

Shapefile, polygon

<1

Shapefile, point

<1

TXT

22

.sd, Iview3D viewer

96

Farallon Islands
Bathymetric survey coducted by Fugro Pelagos Inc,
Data Analyses by the Seafloor Mapping Lab
 

GeoTiff

KMZ -grayscale
KMZ -color

Bathymetry DEM (2m)

GRID

Bathymetry DEM (5m)

GRID

83

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m,5m,10m)

GRID

Shapefile polygon

<1

GRID

GRID

29

 
CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

Farallon Islands Survey Data Footprint

GeoTiff

20

GRID

28

GRID

14

GRID

51

Shapefile, line

10

Shapefile, polygon

Shapefile, polygon

2

Shapefile, point

Shapefile, point

Shapefile, point

Shapefile, line

GRID, TXT, Fledermaus

31

Cordell Bank

 

GeoTiff

4

 

GeoTiff

9

 

GeoTiff

4

 

GeoTiff

9

 

GeoTiff

4

 

GeoTiff

9

 

GeoTiff

 
Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (3m)

GRID

26

 

Shapefile, line

<1

 

Shapefile, polygon

<1

 

GRID

13

 

GRID

13

 

GRID

5

 

GRID

3

 

Shapefile, point

<1

 

TXT

81

 

.sd, Iview3D viewer

34

 
Outer Santa Cruz Basin Survey Data Footprint

GeoTiff

Shapefile, polygon

73

South Central Coast
Blocks , Blocks

Data are located here
Morro Bay

GeoTiff

3

GeoTiff

8

GeoTiff

91

GRID

28

Bathymetric Contours (1m)

Shapefile, line

<1

Shapefile, polygon

<1

Shapefile, point

<1

TXT

22

.sd, Iview3D viewer

31

Morro Bay Harbor

GeoTiff

 

GeoTiff

1

 
Bathymetry DEM (2m)

GRID

 

TXT

 

.sd, Iview3D viewer

2

 
Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block A

 

GeoTiff

11

GeoTiff

31

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

25

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

10

GRID

2

TXT

.sd, Iview3D viewer

44

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

4

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block A2

 

GeoTiff

2

GeoTiff

19

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

5

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

2

GRID

1

TXT

15

.sd, Iview3D viewer

8

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

2

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block A3

 

GeoTiff

29

GeoTiff

27

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

57

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

22

GRID

7

TXT

.sd, Iview3D viewer

96

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

52

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block B
Updated Data as of 10/11
-Updated files include original () survey coverage merged with extended inshore coverage ()


 

GeoTiff

68

GeoTiff

34

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (1m, 2m, 5m)

GRID

71

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

23

GRID

7

TXT

67

.sd, Iview3D viewer

81

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

32

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block C
Updated Data as of 10/11

-Updated files include original () survey coverage merged with extended inshore coverage ()


 

GeoTiff

82

GeoTiff

90

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (1m, 2m, 5m)

GRID

96

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

27

GRID

8

TXT

79

.sd, Iview3D viewer

90

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

10

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block D
Updated Data as of 10/11
-Updated files include original () survey coverage merged with extended inshore coverage ()


 

GeoTiff

GeoTiff

90

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (1m, 2m)

GRID

92

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

32

GRID

10

 

TXT

.sd, Iview3D viewer

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

15

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block E

 

GeoTiff

23

GeoTiff

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

59

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

18

GRID

4

TXT

.sd, Iview3D viewer

89

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

5

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block F

 

GeoTiff

17

GeoTiff

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

49

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

17

GRID

1

TXT

.sd, Iview3D viewer

83

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

12

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block G

 

GeoTiff

16

GeoTiff

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

46

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

15

GRID

1

TXT

.sd, Iview3D viewer

89

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

5

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block H

 

GeoTiff

20

GeoTiff

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

56

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

20

GRID

3

TXT

.sd, Iview3D viewer

97

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

36

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block I

  

GeoTiff

21

GeoTiff

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

55

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

12

GRID

4

TXT

7

.sd, Iview3D viewer

11

CA Geology Series Project MXDTracklinesShapefile-lines

11

Central Coast / South of Morro Bay - Avila Bay: Block J

 

GeoTiff

15

GeoTiff

Bathymetry, Hillshade, Slope DEM (2m, 5m)

GRID

40

Shapefile lines, polygons

<1

GRID

13

GRID

1

TXT

Sours: https://seafloor.otterlabs.org/SFMLwebDATA_c.htm

Two multibeam sonar surveys of west-central San Francisco Bay, California, were conducted in and Bathymetric change analysis between the two surveys indicates a loss of million cubic meters ( cm/yr) of sediment during this time period, representing an approximately three-fold acceleration of the rate that was observed from prior depth change analysis from to for all of Central Bay, using more spatially coarse National Ocean Service (NOS) soundings. The portions of the overlapping survey areas between and designated as aggregate mining lease sites lost sediment at five times the rate of the remainder of west-central San Francisco Bay. Despite covering only 28% of the analysis area, volume change within leasing areas accounted for million cubic meters of sediment loss, while the rest of the area lost million cubic meters of sediment. The uncertainty of this recent analysis is more tightly constrained due to more stringent controls on vertical and horizontal position via tightly coupled, inertially aided differential Global Positioning Systems (GPS) solutions for survey vessel trajectory that virtually eliminate inaccuracies from traditional tide modeling and vessel motion artifacts. Further, quantification of systematic depth measurement error can now be calculated through comparison of static surfaces (e.g., bedrock) between surveys using seafloor habitat maps based on acoustic backscatter measurements and ground-truthing with grab samples and underwater video. Sediment loss in the entire San Francisco Bay Coastal System during the last half-century, as estimated from a series of bathymetric change studies, is million cubic meters, and most of this is believed to be coarse sediment (i.e., sand and gravel) from Central Bay and the San Francisco Bar, which is likely to limit the sand supply to adjacent, open-coast beaches. This hypothesis is supported by a calibrated numerical model in a related study that indicates that there is a potential net export of sand-sized sediment across the Golden Gate, suggesting that a reduction in the supply of sand-sized sediment within west-central San Francisco Bay will limit transport to the outer coast.

Sours: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/6khg

San francisco bay bathymetry

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Saving the Bay - The Formation of San Francisco Bay

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