Wikipedia puss in boots

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Puss in Boots (2011 film)

2011 film by Chris Miller

Puss in Boots is a 2011 American computer-animatedfantasyadventure comedy film[4] produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by Paramount Pictures. It is directed by Chris Miller, who also directed Shrek the Third (2007), from a screenplay by Tom Wheeler and a story by Brian Lynch, Will Davies, and Wheeler. It stars Antonio Banderas, Salma Hayek, Zach Galifianakis, Billy Bob Thornton, and Amy Sedaris.

A spin-off of the Shrek franchise, taking place before Shrek 2, and rather than an adaptation of the Puss in Boots fairytale, the film follows the character Puss in Boots on his adventures prior to his first appearance in Shrek 2 (2004). Accompanied by his friends, Humpty Dumpty and Kitty Softpaws, Puss is pitted against Jack and Jill, two murderous outlaws in ownership of legendary magical beans that lead to a great fortune.

The film was released in theaters on October 28, 2011 in 2D, Digital 3D, and IMAX 3D formats.[5][6]Puss in Boots received positive reviews from critics, grossed $554.9 million at the box office, and was nominated for Best Animated Feature at the 84th Academy Awards. A television series spin-off from the film titled The Adventures of Puss in Boots premiered on Netflix in 2015.[7] A sequel, titled Puss in Boots: The Last Wish, is set to be released on September 23, 2022.[8]

Plot[edit]

Puss in Boots is a Spanish-speaking, anthropomorphic cat named for his signature pair of boots. A fugitive on the run from the law, Puss is seeking to restore his lost honor. He learns that the murderous outlaw couple Jack and Jill have the magic beans he has long sought, which can lead him to a giant's castle known by legend to contain valuable golden goose eggs. When Puss attempts to steal the beans at their hideout, a female cat named Kitty Softpaws interrupts. She was hired to steal them as well by Humpty Alexander Dumpty, a talking egg and long-estranged childhood friend of Puss from the orphanage where they both were raised. Puss tells Kitty his origin story and how he felt betrayed by Humpty, who tricked Puss into committing a bank robbery in his hometown of San Ricardo. Puss has been on the run ever since. Humpty eventually convinces Puss to join them in finding the beans and retrieving the golden eggs.

Puss and Kitty's relationship turns romantic, as the trio steals the beans from Jack and Jill and plants them in the desert. They ride the beanstalk into the clouds and enter the giant's castle, where Humpty reveals to Puss that the giant died a long time ago. They must still avoid the Great Terror, a giant goose that guards the golden eggs. They soon realize the golden eggs are too heavy and decide to steal the goose's baby gosling after witnessing that it lays golden eggs. They manage to escape the castle and then cut down the beanstalk. After celebrating, the group is ambushed by Jack and Jill, and Puss is knocked unconscious.

When he wakes, Puss assumes Humpty and Kitty were kidnapped and tracks Jack and Jill's wagon back to San Ricardo. There, he learns that the kidnapping was staged. Jack, Jill, and Kitty, are all working for Humpty, who is seeking revenge against Puss for abandoning him during the failed heist all those years ago. Puss is surrounded by the town's militia and turns himself in following pleas from his adoptive mother Imelda. As Puss is hauled away to jail, Humpty is celebrated as a hero for bringing the wealth of the golden eggs to the townspeople.

Puss meets Andy Beanstalk in prison, otherwise known by his friends as Jack, in reference to the character from "Jack and the Beanstalk". Humpty originally stole the beans from Jack during his confinement, and Jack warns Puss that the Great Terror is the gosling's mother, a giant goose that will destroy the town trying to recover her child. Puss realizes that luring the Great Terror was Humpty's intention all along, hoping to destroy the town in revenge for his imprisonment and flee with the gosling in the chaos. Kitty frees Puss from prison and apologizes, revealing her feelings for him. He locates Humpty in time and convinces him to do the right thing: redeem himself by helping save the town from destruction. Using the gosling as bait, Puss and Humpty are able to lure the Great Terror away from town. With Kitty's help, they also thwart Jack and Jill's attempt to steal the gosling during the chase. As they reach the outskirts of town, Humpty and the gosling are knocked off a collapsing bridge but manage to hang onto a rope that Puss grabs. When it becomes evident that Puss cannot save them both, Humpty sacrifices himself by letting go. After a fatal impact, Puss discovers that Humpty was a large golden egg underneath his shell. The Great Terror is reunited with her gosling, and she takes Humpty's golden egg remains back to the giant's castle.

Despite saving the town and being hailed a hero by the townspeople, Puss is still a fugitive in the eyes of the militia. He flees with Kitty, who playfully steals his boots and runs off. In the epilogue, Jack and Jill are recovering from their injuries, Humpty is shown back in his original form up in the clouds, and Puss and Kitty finally share a kiss.

Voice cast[edit]

  • Antonio Banderas as Puss in Boots, a fugitive from the law and a hero of San Ricardo.
  • Zach Galifianakis as Humpty Alexander Dumpty, the mastermind who intends to retrieve the Golden Eggs from the one-of-a-kind Goose.
  • Salma Hayek as Kitty Softpaws, a street-savvy Tuxedo cat who is Puss' female counterpart and love interest.
  • Billy Bob Thornton and Amy Sedaris as Jack and Jill respectively, a murderous outlaw married couple.
  • Constance Marie as Imelda, Puss' human adoptive mother
  • Mike Mitchell as Andy "Jack" Beanstalk
  • Guillermo del Toro as Commandante, the military leader of San Ricardo dispatched to capture Puss
  • Chris Miller as Little Boy Blue, Friar Miller, Prison Guard, Manuel and Rafael

Production[edit]

The film had been in development since 2004, when Shrek 2 was released.[9]Chris Miller, who worked as head of story in Shrek 2, was a big proponent of making an spin-off film centered on the Puss in Boots due to his love for the character and the intriguing story potential he had, given the adventures he mentions to have had in the film.[10] As a Shrek 2 spin-off, it was initially planned for release in 2008 as a direct-to-video film,[11] then titled Puss in Boots: The Story of an Ogre Killer.[12] By October 2006, the film was re-slated as a theatrical release due to market conditions,[13] and due to DreamWorks Animation's realization that the Puss character deserved more.[14] Miller was hired to direct the film immediately after directing Shrek the Third.[10]

In September 2010, Guillermo del Toro signed on as executive producer.[15] Having exited from The Hobbit, del Toro was invited by the crew to watch an early screening of the film, half animated and half storyboarded, which del Toro loved and asked them if he could be somehow involved in the production.[10] Discussing del Toro, Miller stated: "We worked out a system for him to come in once every few months or whenever we had something new to show him. If we needed someone to bounce ideas off of, he was always there, and if we had a problem we were tackling, we'd get Guillermo on the red phone – our emergency phone – and ask him advice on what we should do with a certain character or scene. It was like having our own film school". Miller stated that del Toro was particularly involved in Humpty's character design. "Guillermo loved the dreamy quality of Humpty Dumpty. He suggested we push that further, make him more like da Vinci".[14] It was del Toro's idea to make Humpty "an ingenious freak of nature" who builds contraptions such as a flying machine.[16] Del Toro rewrote the ending to redeem the character and deepen his relationship with Puss – an unconventional conclusion for a family film.[17] He helped design the fantasy elements of the giant's castle, as well as the architecture of the town, which he conceived as "an amalgam of Spain and Mexico".[16]

During the film's production, the filmmakers struggled for a long time about including the Giant from Jack and the Beanstalk, an English fairy tale from which the magic beans and the castle in the clouds were borrowed from. As the filmmakers had already figured out the Giant's world, the Giant itself was challenging for them. They wanted to depict him faithfully like the classic fairy tale legend giant, but despite how hard they tried to incorporate him into the story, his presence turned out to be predictable. In the end, it was decided to have the Giant killed off offscreen in order to subvert fairy tales expectations.[10]

Antonio Banderas reprised his role as Puss in Boots from the Shrek films. According to Miller, the crew wanted to cast Zach Galifianakis, Billy Bob Thornton, Amy Sedaris and Salma Hayek early on during production. As Humpty Dumpty was Galifianakis' first voiceover role, he was allowed to improvise by the filmmakers. Similarly, Bob Thornton enjoyed the experience of voicing Jack as he was looking to challenge himself with a role out of his comfort zone. Sedaris, with whom Miller had worked before, improvised most of her dialogue as Jill, giving almost fifty different versions of her scripted lines.[10] Except for Puss, the film features new characters. Citing the co-writer, David H. Steinberg, "It doesn't overlap with Shrek at all. Partly that was done to tell an original Puss story, but partly because we didn't know what Shrek 4 were going to do with the characters and we couldn't write conflicting storylines."[18] The film was teased in Shrek Forever After, when Shrek finally shuts the book titled "Shrek", and puts it away next to a book titled "Puss in Boots".

Puss in Boots is the first DreamWorks Animation film that was partly made in India. A Bangalore studio owned by Technicolor, which had mainly worked on TV specials and DVD bonus material, spent six months animating three major scenes in the film. The outsourcing had financial advantages, with 40% less labor costs than in the US, but the primary reason for outsourcing to India was lack of personnel, due to the studio producing as many as three films a year.[19]

Music[edit]

Henry Jackman, the composer for Puss in Boots, utilized folk instruments of traditional Latin music. Inspired by Spanish composer Manuel de Falla, Jackman blended guitars and Latin percussion with an orchestral sound influenced by Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel.[21] Mexican guitar duo Rodrigo y Gabriela contributed to Jackman's score, and two of their songs, Diablo Rojo and Hanuman were included in the soundtrack.[22]Lady Gaga's song "Americano" was also featured in the film.[23][24] The soundtrack for the film, featuring the original score by Jackman, was released on October 24, 2011, by Sony Classical.[25]

Release[edit]

Puss in Boots was originally set for release on November 4, 2011, but was instead pushed a week earlier to October 28, 2011.[5] Anne Globe, head of worldwide marketing for DreamWorks Animation, said the decision to move the film's release date a week earlier was to attract parents and their children to see the film before other family-friendly films were released in November 2011.[26]

The film was renamed Cat in Boots in the United Arab Emirates for officially unknown reasons, but it is suspected for religious and cultural reasons.[27][28] According to the UAE's The National Media Council, which is responsible for censorship, the UAE didn't have any involvement in the rename and that "the decision to change the name had been made by the Hollywood studio and the movie distributors in the UAE."[29] Consequently, since the film's distributor was based in the UAE, the same print was syndicated to all theaters throughout the Middle East. However, the name change was limited to the film's original theatrical run, as merchandise and later regional home media release retained the film's original title.

Puss in Boots had its world premiere on October 16, 2011, aboard the Royal Caribbean International's cruise ship Allure of the Seas, docked in Fort Lauderdale, Florida at the time.[30][31] It was theatrically released in the United States on October 28, 2011.[31] The film was digitally re-mastered into IMAX 3D, and was released in 268 North American IMAX theaters and at least 47 IMAX theaters outside North America.[6]

Home media[edit]

Puss in Boots was released on DVD, Blu-ray, and Blu-ray 3D on February 24, 2012. The movie was accompanied by a short animated film titled Puss in Boots: The Three Diablos.[32] As of October 2013, 7.5 million home entertainment units were sold worldwide.[33]

Another featured extra short is "Klepto Kitty"; a three-minute profile of Dusty the Klepto Kitty, a notorious cat in California who steals items from neighbors' yards, some of it captured on a night vision kitty-cam, hung around Dusty's neck by the Animal Planet network for their own documentary.[34]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

The film grossed $149,260,504 in North America, and $405,726,973 in other countries, for a worldwide total of $554,987,477.[2] It is the eleventh highest-grossing film of 2011 and is also the third highest-grossing animated film that year behind Kung Fu Panda 2 ($665.7 million) and Cars 2 ($559.9 million).[35]

In North America, the film topped the box office on its opening day with $9.6 million.[36] On its opening weekend, the film made $34,077,439,[37][38] topping Saw III's record ($33.6 million) for the highest Halloween weekend opening ever.[39] It retained first place during its second weekend, with $33,054,644, declining only 3%.[40]

Outside North America, on its opening weekend, it earned second place with $17.2 million.[41] The film opened at #1 in both the UK with a weekend gross of £1.98 million ($3.1 million),[42] and Australia, with $2.98 million.[43] It topped the box office outside North America on its seventh weekend with $47.1 million from 40 countries.[44] It ranks as the ninth highest-grossing film of 2011 outside North America.[45] Its highest-grossing country after North America was Russia and the CIS ($50.6 million), followed by Germany ($33.9 million) and France and the Maghreb region ($33.2 million).[46]

Critical response[edit]

Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes gave the film a score of 86% based on reviews from 154 critics, with an average rating of 6.87/10. The website's consensus reads, "It isn't deep or groundbreaking, but what it lacks in profundity, Puss in Boots more than makes up for with an abundance of wit, visual sparkle, and effervescent charm."[47]Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average score out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, gives the film a score of 65% based on 24 reviews.[48]CinemaScore polls reported that the average grade moviegoers gave the film was an "A-" on an A+ to F scale.[49]

Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter gave the film a positive review, saying "Puss in Boots is a perfectly diverting romp that happens to showcase some of the best 3D work yet from a mainstream animated feature. Colorful, clever enough, free of cloying showbiz in-jokes, action-packed without being ridiculous about it and even well choreographed."[50] Peter Debruge of Variety gave the film a positive review, saying "Puss' origin story could easily stand on its own -- a testament to clever writing on the part of its creative team and an irresistible central performance by Antonio Banderas."[51] Christy Lemire of the Associated Press gave the film three out of four stars, saying "For quick, lively, family friendly entertainment, "Puss in Boots" works just fine, even in 3-D, which is integrated thoughtfully into the narrative and doesn't just feel like a gimmick."[52] Bill Goodykoontz of The Arizona Republic gave the film three and a half stars out of five, saying "As good as Banderas and Hayek are together, Galifianakis is better, making Humpty-Dumpty, of all people, one of the more intriguing animated characters to come along in a while. He's a nice surprise."[53] Moira MacDonald of The Seattle Times gave the film three out of four stars, saying "I left dreaming of a world in which cats could tango - and when's the last time a movie did that?"[54] Marjorie Baumgarten of The Austin Chronicle gave the film three out of five stars, saying "The seductive interplay of Banderas and Hayek, the barely recognizable vocal contributions of Galifianakis, and the Southern backwoods speech of Thornton and Sedaris all keep us attuned to the events on the screen."[55]

Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a C, saying "In the Shrek films, the joke of Puss in Boots, with his trilled consonants and penchant for chest-puffing sword duels, is that no one this cuddly should try to be this dashing. But in Puss in Boots, that joke wears out its welcome in 15 minutes."[56]Ty Burr of The Boston Globe gave the film three out of four stars, saying "Puss in Boots doesn't break any new ground in the storytelling department, and its reliance on go-go-go state-of-the-art action sequences grows wearying by the end, but the movie has a devilish wit that works for parent and child alike."[57] Elizabeth Weitzman of the New York Daily News gave the film four out of five stars, saying "It's always a pleasure to find a family film that respects its audience all the way up the line."[58] Colin Covert of the Star Tribune gave the film one and a half stars out of four, saying "Remember that toy where you yank a string and hear the sound of a barnyard animal? "Puss in Boots" has about half as much entertainment value."[59] Olly Richards of Empire gave the film three out of five stars, saying "Like most kittens, it's not always perfectly behaved, but at least this new Puss adventure doesn't have you reaching for the cinematic spray bottle. And thank goodness the spin-off does nothing to neuter the charismatic cat's appeal."[60] Stan Hall of The Oregonian gave the film a B, saying "Puss in Boots isn't particularly deep, nor does it take itself seriously -- it just wants to seek glory, win affection and cash in. Done, done and done."[61]

Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times gave the film four out of five stars, saying "Perhaps the most engaging thing about "Puss in Boots" is that it never takes itself too seriously."[62] Stephen Holden of The New York Times gave the film three and a half stars out of five, saying "It is a cheerfully chaotic jumble of fairy tale and nursery rhyme characters parachuted into a Spanish storybook setting."[63] Lou Lumenick of the New York Post gave the film one and a half stars out of four, saying "Basically, this toon is a tired riff on Sergio Leone's spaghetti Westerns, punctuated by more puns and cat jokes than you can shake a litter box at."[64] Claudia Puig of USA Today gave the film three out of four stars, saying "With his impeccable comic timing and lyrical Spanish accent, Banderas' swashbuckling charmer is an undeniable treat."[65] Michael O'Sullivan of The Washington Post gave the film three out of four stars, saying "Puss in Boots" proves there is at least one cat with multiple lives. The feature-length animated spinoff - a star turn for the popular "Shrek" supporting character voiced by Antonio Banderas - is almost shockingly good. And not just because a lot of you will approach it with lowered expectations."[66] Stephen Whitty of the Newark Star-Ledger gave the film three out of four stars, saying "An almost purr-fect little film that even a dog owner can enjoy."[67]

Joe Morgenstern of The Wall Street Journal gave the film a positive review, saying "Puss made his debut in "Shrek 2," then did time in the two decreasingly funny sequels. Now he's got a movie of his own, and not a moment too soon."[68] Lisa Kennedy of The Denver Post gave the film three out of four stars, saying "It would overstate matters to say Puss in Boots leaves its cat holding the bag (we had to get that in). But it also leaves its hero awaiting a richer fable, one befitting his charms and his portrayer's talents."[69] Anna Smith of Time Out gave the film three out of five stars, saying "Puss in Boots is uneven, but when it's on course, cat fans will be in heaven."[70] Amy Biancolli of the Houston Chronicle gave the film three out of five stars, saying "Puss in Boots prances along on three basic truths. One, cats are funny. Two, vain Spanish cats in high-heeled musketeer boots are even funnier. Lastly, booted, vain Spanish cats voiced by a breathy Antonio Banderas are flat-out hilarious."[71] Tasha Robinson of The A.V. Club gave the film a C+, saying "Puss In Boots makes a great theme-park ride, a thrill-a-minute feast for the eyes and the semicircular canals. But while the settings are impressively multidimensional, the characters are flatter than old-school cel drawings."[72]

Accolades[edit]

Award Category Recipient Result
Academy Awards[14]Best Animated Feature Chris MillerNominated
Alliance of Women Film Journalists[73]Best Animated Film
Best Animated Female Salma Hayek
Annie Awards[74]Best Animated Feature
Animated Effects in an Animated Production Can Yuksel
Character Animation in a Feature Production Olivier Staphylas
Character Design in a Feature Production Patrick Mate
Directing in a Feature Production Chris Miller
Music in a Feature Production Henry Jackman
Storyboarding in a Feature Production Bob Logan
Voice Acting in a Feature Production Zach Galifianakis
Editing in a Feature Production Eric Dapkewicz
Critics' Choice Awards[75]Best Animated Feature
Chicago Film Critics Association AwardsAnimated Film
Golden Globe Awards[76]Best Animated Feature Film
Kids Choice Awards[77][78]Favorite Animated Movie Won
Favorite Voice From an Animated Movie Antonio BanderasNominated
Producers Guild of America Awards[79]Best Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures Joe M. Aguilar, Latifa Ouaou
Satellite Awards[80]Best Animated or Mixed Media Film
Saturn Awards[81]Best Animated Film Won
Teen Choice Awards[82]Choice Movie Actress Action/Adventure Salma Hayek Nominated
Toronto Film Critics Association[83]Best Animated Feature
Visual Effects Society Awards[84]Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature Motion Picture Joe M. Aguilar, Guillaume Aretos, Ken Bielenberg, Chris Miller
Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature Motion Picture Antonio Banderas, Ludovic Boouancheau, Laurent Caneiro, Olivier Staphylas for "Puss"
Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature Motion Picture Guillaume Aretos, Greg Lev, Brett Miller, Peter Zaslav for "The Cloud World"
Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Awards[85]Best Animated Feature
Women Film Critics Circle[86]Best Animated Females Won

Future[edit]

Sequel[edit]

In February 2012, director Chris Miller stated that he would love to make a Puss in Boots sequel as the character was set up to have more fantastic, surreal and funnier adventures, but that they would first analyze how the audience reacted to the film and whether they would want a sequel.[10] In November 2012, executive producer Guillermo del Toro said that they already did a couple of script drafts for a sequel, and that Miller wants to take Puss on an adventure to exotic places.[17] In April 2014, Antonio Banderas, the voice of Puss, said that the work on the sequel had just begun.[87] In June 2014, the movie was titled Puss in Boots 2: Nine Lives & 40 Thieves and was scheduled to be released on November 2, 2018.[88] Two months later, it was moved one month to December 21, 2018.[89] In January 2015, Puss in Boots 2 was removed from the release schedule following corporate restructuring and DreamWorks Animation's new policy to release two films a year.[90][91] Two months later, Banderas said in an interview that the script was under restructuring, and that Shrek may appear in the film.[92]

On November 6, 2018, it was announced by Variety that Chris Meledandri had been tasked to being one of the executive producers of both Shrek 5 and Puss in Boots 2, with the cast returning.[93][94] In February 2019, Bob Persichetti, the head of story on the first film and a co-director of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018), signed on to direct the sequel. Latifa Ouaou, who produced the original Puss in Boots film, would oversee development of the sequel alongside Meledandri.[95] In August 2020, the name Puss in Boots: The Last Wish had been trademarked by DreamWorks, revealing the new title of the sequel.[96]

In March 2021, the film received a new release date of September 23, 2022, with DWA's parent company Universal Pictures now handling distribution. Persichetti and Ouaou were respectively replaced by Joel Crawford and Mark Swift as director and producer after having previously done so on The Croods: A New Age (2020), while Antonio Banderas was also confirmed to be reprising his role as Puss.[8]

Animated series[edit]

Main article: The Adventures of Puss in Boots

The film also spawned an animated series that premiered on Netflix on January 16, 2015.[7] It aired 78 episodes across six seasons, with its final season released on the streaming service on January 26, 2018. The series is set before the events of the movie. Eric Bauza voices the titular character.

Video games[edit]

  • Puss in Boots, a video game based on the film, developed by Blitz Games, and published by THQ on October 25, 2011 for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii, and Nintendo DS.[97] It features support for Kinect and PlayStation Move on the respective platforms.[98]
  • Fruit Ninja: Puss in Boots, a Puss in Boots-themed Fruit Ninja video game, which was released on October 20, 2011, on the iOS App Store,[99] and was released for Android devices on November 28, 2011, on the Amazon Appstore.[100]

References[edit]

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puss_in_Boots_(2011_film)

Puss in Boots (disambiguation)

Puss in Boots is a character in a 1697 Italian-French fairy tale by Giovanni Francesco Straparola and Charles Perrault.

Puss in Boots or Puss 'n' Boots may also refer to:

Film and television[edit]

  • Puss in Boots (1922 film), an American animated short by Walt Disney
  • Puss in Boots (1934 film), a ComiColor Cartoon by Ub Iwerks
  • Puss in Boots, a 1936 animated short by Lotte Reiniger
  • Puss in Boots, a 1954 animated short by Lotte Reiniger
  • Der gestiefelte Kater, a 1955 German feature film directed by Herbert B. Fredersdorf
  • Puss in Boots (1961 film), a Mexican film by Roberto Rodríguez
  • Puss in Boots (1969 film), a Japanese animated feature film by Kimio Yabuki
  • "Puss in Boots" (Faerie Tale Theatre), a 1985 episode of Faerie Tale Theatre
  • Puss in Boots (1988 film), a musical by Eugene Marner starring Christopher Walken
  • Puss in Boots (1993 film), an animated feature film of 1993 by Richard Slapczynski
  • Puss in Boots (1999 film), an American animated feature film by Phil Nibbelink
  • Puss in Boots (2011 film), an American animated film featuring the version from Shrek
  • The Adventures of Puss in Boots, a 2015 Netflix animated television series featuring the version from Shrek
  • Adventures of Puss-in-Boots, a 1992 Japanese animated feature film from Enoki Films by Susumu Ishizaki
  • The True History of Puss 'N Boots, a 2009 French animated feature film

Music[edit]

Literature[edit]

Video games[edit]

See also[edit]

Topics referred to by the same term

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puss_in_Boots_(disambiguation)
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The Adventures of Puss in Boots

American animated series

The Adventures of Puss in Boots is an American computer-animated streaming television series. It stars the character Puss in Boots from DreamWorks Animation's Shrek franchise and its 2011 spin-off film, voiced by Eric Bauza. The series premiered with its first five episodes on Netflix on January 16, 2015; the sixth and final season was released on January 26, 2018. It also premiered on Boomerang UK on September 3, 2018.[1][2]

Plot[edit]

The series is set before the events of Puss in Boots (2011) and sees Puss in Boots fight off an endless legion of invaders to protect the previously hidden village of San Lorenzo, after his actions unintentionally broke the spell that protected its legendary mystic treasure from the outside world. Subsequently, he must find a way to restore the protection spell that will cloak the town once more.

Episodes[edit]

Further information: List of The Adventures of Puss in Boots episodes

The first season was released on January 16, 2015 on Netflix, when the first five episodes were released, with further episodes released in May and September 2015.[3][4][5] A second season was released on December 11, 2015.[6] The third season was released on July 15, 2016.[7] The fourth season was released on December 16, 2016.[8] The fifth season was released on July 28, 2017.[9] The sixth and final[10] season was released on January 26, 2018.[11]

An interactive special called "Puss in Book: Trapped in an Epic Tale" was released on June 20, 2017.[12]

Characters[edit]

Main[edit]

Recurring[edit]

  • El Moco (voiced by Danny Trejo)[18][17] – A bandit king who is often foiled in the episodes.[15]
  • The Duchess/Maldonna Eldritch (voiced by Maria Bamford)[18] – One of the recurring villains in the series. She steals the souls of magicians and sorcerers to use their powers- denying observations that she has no magic of her own- and was involved with Artephius; she also had a previous fight with Puss, in which the latter had cut off her foot. In the fourth episode of season 3, she joins Puss in order to stop the Bloodwolf.[15]
  • Jack Sprat (voiced by John Leguizamo)[18][17] – One of Puss's oldest friends who often gets Puss in trouble with his schemes.[15]
  • Uli (voiced by Alan Tudyk) – A clever and manipulative (and somewhat annoying) satyr who initially appears friendly to Puss and his friends, but in reality plots to take over San Lorenzo with the help of the demonic Blood Wolf.
  • Goodsword (voiced by John Rhys-Davies for season 1 and voiced by Jeff Bennett thereafter) – An enchanted sword who falls from the sky stuck into a stone, then chooses Dulcinea to be the town's hero.[18][15]
  • El Guante Blanco (voiced by Jim Cummings) – A black cat with a white front right paw. El Guante Blanco (The White Glove in English) found Puss in the desert after Puss was forced to leave his home town and taught Puss the ways of the sword. El Guante Blanco also wears a hat, belt and sword, but does not wear boots.

Bandits: A large group of thieves who try to steal from San Lorenzo, but the town's protector, Puss In Boots always stops them. Some of them also work for El Moco and they ruled over San Lorenzo once but Puss stops them once again.

Production[edit]

Promotional poster for the series.

The series was announced in March 2014 as part of an agreement between Netflix and DreamWorks Animation, under which the studio will develop more than 300 hours of exclusive programming for the service.[19] In 2015, it was stated that a total of 78 episodes were in production for the series, and they were expected to be released in blocks from 2015 onward in a multi-year deal.[20][21]

Critical reception[edit]

The New York Times gave the first episode a positive review stating that the show "is nicely drawn, and San Lorenzo is populated with some appealingly odd young residents, human and otherwise." Moreover, they praised the humour stating that it was "relatively sophisticated (you could write a psychological treatise on Dulcinea, who has modeled her life on a somewhat vacuous book of epigrams), but not so sophisticated that children will be left behind."[22]

Accolades[edit]

In 2015, the second episode of the series, "Sphinx", was nominated at the Annecy International Animated Film Festival.[23] In 2016, the series won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Casting for an Animated Series or Special.[24]

Comic book[edit]

In April 2016, Titan Comics released the first of a two-issue limited series of comic books as a tie-in to the TV show, under the same title of The Adventures of Puss in Boots.[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qOFMUSk42k
  2. ^"Boomerang UK And Cartoonito UK September 2018 Highlights". RegularCapital: Cartoon Network International News. Turner Broadcasting System Europe (Press Release). Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  3. ^ abcd"Puss in Boots Announces Premiere". Decider. January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2015.
  4. ^Wickman, Kase (April 24, 2015). "Get Ready To Watch 'Legally Blonde' And Everything New On Netflix In May". MTV. Retrieved April 24, 2015.
  5. ^DreamWorks Animation (September 25, 2015). "Puss wishes you a Happy Friday, and he's also here to bring you awesome news! There will be 5 new episodes of The Adventures of Puss in Boots on Netflix this Monday!". Facebook. Retrieved September 26, 2015.
  6. ^"Grab your sword and put on your boots! Puss In Boots is searching for new friends, new treasure, and all-new adventures in the new season of "The Adventures of Puss In Boots," now streaming on Netflix!". Facebook. Retrieved December 11, 2015.
  7. ^Milligan, Mercedes (July 14, 2016). "Exclusive Clip: 'Puss in Boots' Season 3 Debuts Friday". Animation Magazine. Retrieved September 3, 2016.
  8. ^Murthi, Vikram (December 14, 2016). "'The Adventures of Puss in Boots' Season 4 Exclusive Clip: Puss Shows Off His Many Powers". Indiewire. Retrieved December 19, 2016.
  9. ^"Puss In Boots on Facebook". Facebook. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  10. ^"The cat is out of the bag. The series finale of #PussInBoots is NOW STREAMING on Netflix!". Facebook. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  11. ^"What's New on Netflix in January". Vanity Fair. December 13, 2016. Retrieved December 15, 2016.
  12. ^"After 2 years of development, Netflix has released its first interactive show where you choose what happens next".
  13. ^Altmann, Alana (January 16, 2015). "Jayma Mays On 'The Adventures of Puss in Boots,' 'Glee,' and the 'Wet Hot American Summer' Prequel". The Moviefone Blog.
  14. ^Fernandes, Marriska (January 16, 2015). "Jayma Mays dishes on Netflix's The Adventures of Puss in Boots". Tribute.ca.
  15. ^ abcdefghijklmno"The Adventures Of Puss in Boots now on Netflix". SPIN South West. Limerick, Ireland. January 16, 2015. and "The Adventures Of Puss In Boots Now On Netflix". Beat Blog. January 21, 2015. Archived from the original on January 26, 2015.
  16. ^ abcdef"Hidden". The Adventures of Puss in Boots. Season 1. Episode 1.
  17. ^ abcdeBeck, Jerry (January 5, 2015). "FIRST LOOK: Dreamworks' Netflix Original "The Adventures". Animation Scoop. Indiewire.
  18. ^ abcd"Netflix Sets 'The Adventures of Puss in Boots' Series Premiere". Variety. January 5, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2015.
  19. ^"Netflix to Add Three Original Series from DreamWorks Animation, Sets Debut for New 'Turbo FAST' Episodes". Variety. March 13, 2014. Retrieved November 24, 2014.
  20. ^Beck, Jeremy (December 11, 2015). "Netflix/Dreamworks Preview "Adventures Of Puss In Boots" Season 2". Animation Scoop. Retrieved December 11, 2015.
  21. ^Schwartzel, Erich (December 8, 2015). "DreamWorks Animation plans live-action TV shows". Animation Scoop. Retrieved December 11, 2015.
  22. ^Genzlinger, Neil (January 16, 2015). "5 More Lives, and Counting". The New York Times. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  23. ^CITIA. "The Adventures of Puss in Boots "Sphinx"". Annecy.org. Retrieved June 14, 2015.
  24. ^"The 43rd Daytime Creative Arts Emmy Awards"(PDF). Retrieved April 29, 2016.
  25. ^"Puss in Boots #1". Retrieved April 24, 2016.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventures_of_Puss_in_Boots

Puss in Boots

Italian fairy tale about a cat

This article is about the 1697 Italian-French fairy tale. For other uses, see Puss in Boots (disambiguation).

"Master Cat or the Booted Cat" (Italian: Il gatto con gli stivali; French: Le Maître chat ou le Chat botté), commonly known in English as "Puss in Boots", is an Italian[1][2] and later European literary fairy tale about an anthropomorphiccat who uses trickery and deceit to gain power, wealth, and the hand of a princess in marriage for his penniless and low-born master.

The oldest written telling is by Italian author Giovanni Francesco Straparola, who included it in his The Facetious Nights of Straparola (c. 1550–1553) in XIV–XV. Another version was published in 1634 by Giambattista Basile with the title Cagliuso, and a tale was written in French at the close of the seventeenth century by Charles Perrault (1628–1703), a retired civil servant and member of the Académie française. There is a version written by Girolamo Morlini, from whom Straparola used various tales in The Facetious Nights of Straparola. The tale appeared in a handwritten and illustrated manuscript two years before its 1697 publication by Barbin in a collection of eight fairy tales by Perrault called Histoires ou contes du temps passé.[5] The book was an instant success and remains popular.

Perrault's Histoires has had considerable impact on world culture. The original Italian title of the first edition was Costantino Fortunato, but was later known as Il gatto con gli stivali (lit. The cat with the boots); the French title was "Histoires ou contes du temps passé, avec des moralités" with the subtitle "Les Contes de ma mère l'Oye" ("Stories or Fairy Tales from Past Times with Morals", subtitled "Mother Goose Tales"). The frontispiece to the earliest English editions depicts an old woman telling tales to a group of children beneath a placard inscribed "MOTHER GOOSE'S TALES" and is credited with launching the Mother Goose legend in the English-speaking world.

"Puss in Boots" has provided inspiration for composers, choreographers, and other artists over the centuries. The cat appears in the third act pas de caractère of Tchaikovsky's ballet The Sleeping Beauty,[6]appears in the sequels and self-titled spin-off to the animated film Shrek and is signified in the logo of Japanese anime studio Toei Animation. Puss in Boots is also a popular pantomime in the UK.

Plot[edit]

The tale opens with the third and youngest son of a miller receiving his inheritance - a cat. At first, the youngest son laments, as the eldest brother gains the mill, and the middle brother gets the mules. However, the feline is no ordinary cat, but one who requests and receives a pair of boots. Determined to make his master's fortune, the cat bags a rabbit in the forest and presents it to the king as a gift from his master, the fictional Marquis of Carabas. The cat continues making gifts of game to the king for several months, for which he is rewarded.

Puss meets the ogre in a nineteenth-century illustration by Gustave Doré

One day, the king decides to take a drive with his daughter. The cat persuades his master to remove his clothes and enter the river which their carriage passes. The cat disposes of his master's clothing beneath a rock. As the royal coach nears, the cat begins calling for help in great distress. When the king stops to investigate, the cat tells him that his master the Marquis has been bathing in the river and robbed of his clothing. The king has the young man brought from the river, dressed in a splendid suit of clothes, and seated in the coach with his daughter, who falls in love with him at once.

The cat hurries ahead of the coach, ordering the country folk along the road to tell the king that the land belongs to the "Marquis of Carabas", saying that if they do not he will cut them into mincemeat. The cat then happens upon a castle inhabited by an ogre who is capable of transforming himself into a number of creatures. The ogre displays his ability by changing into a lion, frightening the cat, who then tricks the ogre into changing into a mouse. The cat then pounces upon the mouse and devours it. The king arrives at the castle that formerly belonged to the ogre, and impressed with the bogus Marquis and his estate, gives the lad the princess in marriage. Thereafter; the cat enjoys life as a great lord who runs after mice only for his own amusement.[7]

The tale is followed immediately by two morals; "one stresses the importance of possessing industrie and savoir faire while the other extols the virtues of dress, countenance, and youth to win the heart of a princess".[8] The Italian translation by Carlo Collodi notes that the tale gives useful advice if you happen to be a cat or a Marquis of Carabas.

This is the theme in France, but other versions of this theme exist in Asia, Africa, and South America.[9]

Background[edit]

Handwritten and illustrated manuscript of Perrault's "Le Maître Chat" dated 1695

Perrault's the "Master Cat or Puss in Boots" is the most renowned tale in all of Western folklore of the animal as helper. However, the trickster cat was not Perrault's invention.[11] Centuries before the publication of Perrault's tale, Somadeva, a KashmirBrahmin, assembled a vast collection of Indianfolk tales called Kathā Sarit Sāgara (lit. "The ocean of the streams of stories") that featured stock fairy tale characters and trappings such as invincible swords, vessels that replenish their contents, and helpful animals. In the Panchatantra (lit. "Five Principles"), a collection of Hindu tales from the 2nd century BC., a tale follows a cat who fares much less well than Perrault's Puss as he attempts to make his fortune in a king's palace.

In 1553, "Costantino Fortunato", a tale similar to "Le Maître Chat", was published in Venice in Giovanni Francesco Straparola's Le Piacevoli Notti (lit. The Facetious Nights), the first European storybook to include fairy tales. In Straparola's tale however, the poor young man is the son of a Bohemian woman, the cat is a fairy in disguise, the princess is named Elisetta, and the castle belongs not to an ogre but to a lord who conveniently perishes in an accident. The poor young man eventually becomes King of Bohemia. An edition of Straparola was published in France in 1560. The abundance of oral versions after Straparola's tale may indicate an oral source to the tale; it also is possible Straparola invented the story.[15]

In 1634, another tale with a trickster cat as hero was published in Giambattista Basile's collection Pentamerone although neither the collection nor the tale were published in France during Perrault's lifetime. In Basile, the lad is a beggar boy called Gagliuso (sometimes Cagliuso) whose fortunes are achieved in a manner similar to Perrault's Puss. However, the tale ends with Cagliuso, in gratitude to the cat, promising the feline a gold coffin upon his death. Three days later, the cat decides to test Gagliuso by pretending to be dead and is mortified to hear Gagliuso tell his wife to take the dead cat by its paws and throw it out the window. The cat leaps up, demanding to know whether this was his promised reward for helping the beggar boy to a better life. The cat then rushes away, leaving his master to fend for himself. In another rendition, the cat performs acts of bravery, then a fairy comes and turns him to his normal state to be with other cats.

It is likely that Perrault was aware of the Straparola tale, since 'Facetious Nights' was translated into French in the sixteenth century and subsequently passed into the oral tradition.

Publication[edit]

The oldest record of written history was published in Venice by the Italian author Giovanni Francesco Straparola in his The Facetious Nights of Straparola (c. 1550–53) in XIV-XV. His original title was Costantino Fortunato (lit. Lucky Costantino).

Le Maître Chat, ou le Chat Botté was later published by Barbin in Paris in January 1697 in a collection of tales called Histoires ou contes du temps passé. The collection included "La Belle au bois dormant" ("The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood"), "Le petit chaperon rouge" ("Little Red Riding Hood"), "La Barbe bleue" ("Blue Beard"), "Les Fées" ("The Enchanted Ones", or "Diamonds and Toads"), "Cendrillon, ou la petite pantoufle de verre" ("Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper"), "Riquet à la Houppe" ("Riquet with the Tuft"), and "Le Petit Poucet" ("Hop o' My Thumb"). The book displayed a frontispiece depicting an old woman telling tales to a group of three children beneath a placard inscribed "CONTES DE MA MERE L'OYE" (Tales of Mother Goose). The book was an instant success.

Le Maître Chat first was translated into English as "The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots" by Robert Samber in 1729 and published in London for J. Pote and R. Montagu with its original companion tales in Histories, or Tales of Past Times, By M. Perrault.[note 1] The book was advertised in June 1729 as being "very entertaining and instructive for children". A frontispiece similar to that of the first French edition appeared in the English edition launching the Mother Goose legend in the English-speaking world. Samber's translation has been described as "faithful and straightforward, conveying attractively the concision, liveliness and gently ironic tone of Perrault's prose, which itself emulated the direct approach of oral narrative in its elegant simplicity."[17] Since that publication, the tale has been translated into various languages and published around the world.

Question of authorship[edit]

Perrault's son Pierre Darmancour was assumed to have been responsible for the authorship of Histoires with the evidence cited being the book's dedication to Élisabeth Charlotte d'Orléans, the youngest niece of Louis XIV, which was signed "P. Darmancour". Perrault senior, however, was known for some time to have been interested in contes de veille or contes de ma mère l'oye, and in 1693 published a versification of "Les Souhaits Ridicules" and, in 1694, a tale with a Cinderella theme called "Peau d'Ane". Further, a handwritten and illustrated manuscript of five of the tales (including Le Maistre Chat ou le Chat Botté) existed two years before the tale's 1697 Paris publication.

Pierre Darmancour was sixteen or seventeen years old at the time the manuscript was prepared and, as scholars Iona and Peter Opie note, quite unlikely to have been interested in recording fairy tales. Darmancour, who became a soldier, showed no literary inclinations, and, when he died in 1700, his obituary made no mention of any connection with the tales. However, when Perrault senior died in 1703, the newspaper alluded to his being responsible for "La Belle au bois dormant", which the paper had published in 1696.

Analysis[edit]

In folkloristics, Puss in Boots is classified as Aarne–Thompson–Uther ATU 545B, "Puss in Boots", a subtype of ATU 545, "The Cat as Helper".[18]FolkloristsJoseph Jacobs and Stith Thompson point that the Perrault's tale is the possible source of the Cat Helper story in later European folkloric traditions.[19][20] The tale has also spread to the Americas, and is known in Asia (India, Indonesia and Philippines).[21]

Variations of the feline helper across cultures replace the cat with a jackal or fox.[22][23][24]

Greek scholar Marianthi Kaplanoglou states that the tale type ATU 545B, "Puss in Boots" (or, locally, "The Helpful Fox"), is an "example" of "widely known stories (...) in the repertoires of Greek refugees from Asia Minor".[25]

Adaptations[edit]

Main article: Adaptations of Puss in Boots

Perrault's tale has been adapted to various media over the centuries. Ludwig Tieck published a dramatic satire based on the tale, called Der gestiefelte Kater,[26] and, in 1812, the Brothers Grimm inserted a version of the tale into their Kinder- und Hausmärchen.[27] In ballet, Puss appears in the third act of Tchaikovsky's The Sleeping Beauty in a pas de caractère with The White Cat.[6]

In film and television, Walt Disney produced an animated black and white silent short based on the tale in 1922.[28]

It was also adapted into a manga by the famous Japanese writer and director Hayao Miyazaki, followed by an anime feature film, distributed by Toei in 1969. The title character, Pero, named after Perrault, has since then become the mascot of Toei Animation, with his face appearing in the studio's logo.

In the mid-1980s, Puss in Boots was televised as an episode of Faerie Tale Theatre with Ben Vereen and Gregory Hines in the cast.[29]

Another version from the Cannon Movie Tales series features Christopher Walken as Puss, who in this adaptation is a cat who turns into a human when wearing the boots.

The TV show Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child features the story in a Hawaiian setting. The episode stars the voices of David Hyde Pierce as Puss in Boots, Dean Cain as Kuhio, Pat Morita as King Makahata, and Ming-Na Wen as Lani. In addition, the shapeshifting ogre is replaced with a shapeshifting giant (voiced by Keone Young).

Another adaptation of the character with little relation to the story was in the Pokémon anime episode "Like a Meowth to a Flame," where a Meowth owned by the character Tyson wore boots, a hat, and a neckerchief.

DreamWorks Animation released the animated feature Puss in Boots, with Antonio Banderas reprising his voice-over role of Puss in Boots from the Shrek films, on November 4, 2011. This new film's story bears no similarities to the book. It led to the Netflix/DreamWorks series The Adventures of Puss in Boots where Puss was voiced by Eric Bauza.

The phrase "enough to make a cat laugh" dates from the mid-1800s and is associated with the tale of Puss in Boots. [30]

[edit]

Jacques Barchilon and Henry Pettit note in their introduction to The Authentic Mother Goose: Fairy Tales and Nursery Rhymes that the main motif of "Puss in Boots" is the animal as helper and that the tale "carries atavistic memories of the familiar totem animal as the father protector of the tribe found everywhere by missionaries and anthropologists." They also note that the title is original with Perrault as are the boots; no tale prior to Perrault's features a cat wearing boots.[31]

Woodcut frontispiececopied from the 1697 Paris edition of Perrault's tales and published in the English-speaking world.

Folklorists Iona and Peter Opie observe that "the tale is unusual in that the hero little deserves his good fortune, that is if his poverty, his being a third child, and his unquestioning acceptance of the cat's sinful instructions, are not nowadays looked upon as virtues." The cat should be acclaimed the prince of 'con' artists, they declare, as few swindlers have been so successful before or since.[11]

The success of Histoires is attributed to seemingly contradictory and incompatible reasons. While the literary skill employed in the telling of the tales has been recognized universally, it appears the tales were set down in great part as the author heard them told. The evidence for that assessment lies first in the simplicity of the tales, then in the use of words that were, in Perrault's era, considered populaire and du bas peuple, and finally, in the appearance of vestigial passages that now are superfluous to the plot, do not illuminate the narrative, and thus, are passages the Opies believe a literary artist would have rejected in the process of creating a work of art. One such vestigial passage is Puss's boots; his insistence upon the footwear is explained nowhere in the tale, it is not developed, nor is it referred to after its first mention except in an aside.

According to the Opies, Perrault's great achievement was accepting fairy tales at "their own level." He recounted them with neither impatience nor mockery, and without feeling that they needed any aggrandisement such as a frame story—although he must have felt it useful to end with a rhyming moralité. Perrault would be revered today as the father of folklore if he had taken the time to record where he obtained his tales, when, and under what circumstances.

Bruno Bettelheim remarks that "the more simple and straightforward a good character in a fairy tale, the easier it is for a child to identify with it and to reject the bad other." The child identifies with a good hero because the hero's condition makes a positive appeal to him. If the character is a very good person, then the child is likely to want to be good too. Amoral tales, however, show no polarization or juxtaposition of good and bad persons because amoral tales such as "Puss in Boots" build character, not by offering choices between good and bad, but by giving the child hope that even the meekest can survive. Morality is of little concern in these tales, but rather, an assurance is provided that one can survive and succeed in life.[33]

Small children can do little on their own and may give up in disappointment and despair with their attempts. Fairy stories, however, give great dignity to the smallest achievements (such as befriending an animal or being befriended by an animal, as in "Puss in Boots") and that such ordinary events may lead to great things. Fairy stories encourage children to believe and trust that their small, real achievements are important although perhaps not recognized at the moment.[34]

In Fairy Tales and the Art of SubversionJack Zipes notes that Perrault "sought to portray ideal types to reinforce the standards of the civilizing process set by upper-class French society".[8] A composite portrait of Perrault's heroines, for example, reveals the author's idealized female of upper-class society is graceful, beautiful, polite, industrious, well groomed, reserved, patient, and even somewhat stupid because for Perrault, intelligence in womankind would be threatening. Therefore, Perrault's composite heroine passively waits for "the right man" to come along, recognize her virtues, and make her his wife. He acts, she waits. If his seventeenth century heroines demonstrate any characteristics, it is submissiveness.[35]

A composite of Perrault's male heroes, however, indicates the opposite of his heroines: his male characters are not particularly handsome, but they are active, brave, ambitious, and deft, and they use their wit, intelligence, and great civility to work their way up the social ladder and to achieve their goals. In this case of course, it is the cat who displays the characteristics and the man benefits from his trickery and skills. Unlike the tales dealing with submissive heroines waiting for marriage, the male-centered tales suggest social status and achievement are more important than marriage for men. The virtues of Perrault's heroes reflect upon the bourgeoisie of the court of Louis XIV and upon the nature of Perrault, who was a successful civil servant in France during the seventeenth century.[8]

According to fairy and folk tale researcher and commentator Jack Zipes, Puss is "the epitome of the educated bourgeois secretary who serves his master with complete devotion and diligence."[35] The cat has enough wit and manners to impress the king, the intelligence to defeat the ogre, and the skill to arrange a royal marriage for his low-born master. Puss's career is capped by his elevation to grand seigneur[8] and the tale is followed by a double moral: "one stresses the importance of possessing industrie et savoir faire while the other extols the virtues of dress, countenance, and youth to win the heart of a princess."[8]

The renowned illustrator of Dickens' novels and stories, George Cruikshank, was shocked that parents would allow their children to read "Puss in Boots" and declared: "As it stood the tale was a succession of successful falsehoods—a clever lesson in lying!—a system of imposture rewarded with the greatest worldly advantages."

Another critic, Maria Tatar, notes that there is little to admire in Puss—he threatens, flatters, deceives, and steals in order to promote his master. She further observes that Puss has been viewed as a "linguistic virtuoso", a creature who has mastered the arts of persuasion and rhetoric to acquire power and wealth.[5]

"Puss in Boots" has successfully supplanted its antecedents by Straparola and Basile and the tale has altered the shapes of many older oral trickster cat tales where they still are found. The morals Perrault attached to the tales are either at odds with the narrative, or beside the point. The first moral tells the reader that hard work and ingenuity are preferable to inherited wealth, but the moral is belied by the poor miller's son who neither works nor uses his wit to gain worldly advantage, but marries into it through trickery performed by the cat. The second moral stresses womankind's vulnerability to external appearances: fine clothes and a pleasant visage are enough to win their hearts. In an aside, Tatar suggests that if the tale has any redeeming meaning, "it has something to do with inspiring respect for those domestic creatures that hunt mice and look out for their masters."[36]

Briggs does assert that cats were a form of fairy in their own right having something akin to a fairy court and their own set of magical powers. Still, it is rare in Europe's fairy tales for a cat to be so closely involved with human affairs. According to Jacob Grimm, Puss shares many of the features that a household fairy or deity would have including a desire for boots which could represent seven-league boots. This may mean that the story of "Puss and Boots" originally represented the tale of a family deity aiding an impoverished family member.[37][self-published source]

Stefan Zweig, in his 1939 novel, Ungeduld des Herzens, references Puss in Boots' procession through a rich and varied countryside with his master and drives home his metaphor with a mention of Seven League Boots.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^The distinction of being the first to translate the tales into English was long questioned. An edition styled Histories or Tales of Past Times, told by Mother Goose, with Morals. Written in French by M. Perrault, and Englished by G.M. Gent bore the publication date of 1719, thus casting doubt upon Samber being the first translator. In 1951, however, the date was proven to be a misprint for 1799 and Samber's distinction as the first translator was assured.
Footnotes
  1. ^W. G. Waters, The Mysterious Giovan Francesco Straparola, in Jack Zipes, a c. di, The Great Fairy Tale Tradition: From Straparola and Basile to the Brothers Grimm, p 877, ISBN 0-393-97636-X
  2. ^Opie & Opie 1974 Further info: Little Red PentecostalArchived 2007-10-23 at the Wayback Machine, Peter J. Leithart, July 9, 2007.
  3. ^ abTatar 2002, p. 234
  4. ^ abBrown 2007, p. 351
  5. ^Opie & Opie 1974, pp. 113–116
  6. ^ abcdeZipes 1991, p. 26
  7. ^Darnton, Robert (1984). The Great Cat Massacre. New York, NY: Basic Books, Ink. p. 29. ISBN .
  8. ^ abOpie & Opie 1974, p. 110
  9. ^Zipes 2001, p. 877
  10. ^Gillespie & Hopkins 2005, p. 351
  11. ^Thompson, Stith. The Folktale. University of California Press. 1977. pp. 58-59. ISBN 0-520-03537-2
  12. ^Thompson, Stith. The Folktale. University of California Press. 1977. p. 58. ISBN 0-520-03537-2
  13. ^Jacobs, Joseph. European Folk and Fairy Tales. New York, London: G. P. Putnam's sons. 1916. pp. 239-240.
  14. ^Thompson, Stith. The Folktale. University of California Press. 1977. p. 59. ISBN 0-520-03537-2
  15. ^Uther, Hans-Jörg. "The Fox in World Literature: Reflections on a "Fictional Animal"." Asian Folklore Studies 65, no. 2 (2006): 133-60. www.jstor.org/stable/30030396.
  16. ^Kaplanoglou, Marianthi. "AT 545B "Puss in Boots" and "The Fox-Matchmaker": From the Central Asian to the European Tradition." Folklore 110 (1999): 57-62. www.jstor.org/stable/1261067.
  17. ^Thompson, Stith. The Folktale. University of California Press. 1977. p. 58. ISBN 0-520-03537-2
  18. ^Kaplanoglou, Marianthi. "Two Storytellers from the Greek-Orthodox Communities of Ottoman Asia Minor. Analyzing Some Micro-data in Comparative Folklore". In: Fabula 51, no. 3-4 (2010): 253. https://doi.org/10.1515/fabl.2010.024
  19. ^Paulin 2002, p. 65
  20. ^Wunderer 2008, p. 202
  21. ^"Puss in Boots". The Disney Encyclopedia of Animated Shorts. Archived from the original on 2016-06-05. Retrieved 2009-06-14.
  22. ^Zipes 1997, p. 102
  23. ^"https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/enough+to+make+a+cat+laugh">enough to make a cat laugh
  24. ^Barchilon 1960, pp. 14, 16
  25. ^Bettelheim 1977, p. 10
  26. ^Bettelheim 1977, p. 73
  27. ^ abZipes 1991, p. 25
  28. ^Tatar 2002, p. 235
  29. ^Nukiuk H. 2011 Grimm's Fairies: Discover the Fairies of Europe's Fairy Tales, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Works cited
  • Barchilon, Jacques (1960), The Authentic Mother Goose: Fairy Tales and Nursery Rhymes, Denver, CO: Alan Swallow
  • Bettelheim, Bruno (1977) [1975, 1976], The Uses of Enchantment, New York: Random House: Vintage Books, ISBN 
  • Brown, David (2007), Tchaikovsky, New York: Pegasus Books LLC, ISBN 
  • Gillespie, Stuart; Hopkins, David, eds. (2005), The Oxford History of Literary Translation in English: 1660–1790, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN 
  • Opie, Iona; Opie, Peter (1974), The Classic Fairy Tales, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN 
  • Paulin, Roger (2002) [1985], Ludwig Tieck, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN 
  • Tatar, Maria (2002), The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales, New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company, ISBN 
  • Wunderer, Rolf (2008), "Der gestiefelte Kater" als Unternehmer, Weisbaden: Gabler Verlag, ISBN 
  • Zipes, Jack David (1991) [1988], Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, New York: Routledge, ISBN 
  • Zipes, Jack David (2001), The Great Fairy Tale Tradition: From Straparola and Basile to the Brothers Grimm, p. 877, ISBN 
  • Zipes, Jack David (1997), Happily Ever After, New York: Routledge, ISBN 

Further reading[edit]

  • Neuhaus, Mareike. "The Rhetoric of Harry Robinson's "Cat With the Boots On"." Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal 44, no. 2 (2011): 35-51. www.jstor.org/stable/44029507.
  • Nikolajeva, Maria. "Devils, Demons, Familiars, Friends: Toward a Semiotics of Literary Cats." Marvels & Tales 23, no. 2 (2009): 248–67. www.jstor.org/stable/41388926.
  • "Jack Ships to the Cat." In: Clever Maids, Fearless Jacks, and a Cat: Fairy Tales from a Living Oral Tradition, edited by Best, Anita; Lovelace, Martin, and Greenhill, Pauline, by Blair Graham, 93-103. University Press of Colorado, 2019. www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctvqc6hwd.11.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puss_in_Boots

Puss in boots wikipedia

Adaptations of Puss in Boots

Adaptations of a fairy tale about a cat

'Puss' is a character in the fairy tale "The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots" by Charles Perrault. The tale was published in 1697 in his Histoires ou Contes du temps passé.[1] The tale of a cat helping an impoverished master attain wealth through its trickery is known in hundreds of variants.[2]

  • Gustave Doré created an illustrated version (right).
  • In 1797 German writer Ludwig Tieck published Der gestiefelte Kater, a dramatic satire based on the Puss in Boots tale.
  • The Russian composer César Cui (of French ancestry) composed a short children's opera on this subject in 1913. Puss in Boots was first performed in Rome in 1915, and has been something of a repertory item in Germany since at least the 1970s.
  • In 1922 Walt Disney created a black and white silent short of the same name.
  • Xavier Montsalvatge composed a children's opera, El gato con botas, with libretto by Néstor Luján; it was first performed in BarcelonaGran Teatre del Liceu in 1947. It has been performed for children several times, in Spain, but also in Germany, Czech Republic, Australia and New York.
  • In their album of cat songs, Happy Times Records included a version of Puss in Boots. As with their version of The Pied Piper of Hamelin, it is not faithful to the original fairy tale and features a cat named Puss in Boots who is the guardian of his native village. He saves the village from several invasions by using his head and is summoned by the song, "Come, boots!/Come, boots!/Come a runnin',/Puss in Boots." The man and woman who perform this story/song are the same ones who perform Happy Times's version of The Pied Piper, and the number ends with the words, "The whole village is proud of their magical cat!"
  • A 1961 Mexican adaptation called El gato con botas. K. Gordon Murray distributed it in the United States as Puss in Boots.
  • Hayao Miyazaki participated in the 1969 Toei Animation production of Nagagutsu wo Haita Neko (Puss 'n Boots), providing key animation, designs, storyboards, image boards, and story ideas. It was directed by Kimio Yabuki, with a screenplay by Hisashi Inoue, a famous Japanese playwright, and animation supervision was carried out by longtime Miyazaki collaborator and mentor Yasuji Mori. Hayao Miyazaki also wrote and drew a comic version first serialized in Chuunichi Shimbun Nichiyou Ban(Cyuunichi Newspaper Sunday Version) to promote the film. Its main character, the cat Pero, was very popular and eventually became Toei's mascot.
  • Rankin/Bass Productions produced a hand drawn animated TV special in 1972 entitled Puss in Boots.
  • The Master Cat by David Garnett is a novel first published in 1974 which gives a more detailed account of the established story from Puss getting the boots to his eating the ogre. The second part of the book tells of Puss getting caught up in palace plots and intrigues of which he ultimately becomes the victim, by his own ungrateful master no less.
  • In 1985 the family television series Faerie Tale Theatre produced a live-action adaptation starring Ben Vereen as Puss and Gregory Hines as the miller's son.
  • In an episode of Monty Python's Flying Circus, a sketch set in the Police Department of the State of Venezuela is interrupted by an unexpected adaptation of Puss in Boots.
  • A live actiondirect-to-videofilm adaptation was made in 1988, starring Christopher Walken as Puss and Jason Connery as the miller's son.
  • Enoki Films released a Japanese animated series called Nagagutsu wo Haita Neko no Bouken (Adventures of Puss-in-Boots) in 1992.
  • Puss by Esther Friesner, in Snow White, Blood Red (edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling) retells the story.
  • Plaza Entertainment released an animated direct-to-video film called Puss in Boots in 1999.
  • Puss in Boots appears as a character in the films Shrek 2 and Shrek The Third (voiced by Antonio Banderas). The character is originally recruited as a swashbuckling professional ogre killer who is an obvious parody of Banderas' famous role as Zorro. Puss later becomes a sidekick to the ogre Shrek, and in the alternative world in Shrek Forever After due to Rumpelstiltskin erasing the day Shrek was born when he made him sign a contract, Puss is seen to have retired from fencing and he became Fiona's pet; he has also become obese. A self-titled spin-off film was released in 2011. Puss in Boots, a video game based on the film, was released in October 2011. He was also the star of the 2015 Netflix original series The Adventures of Puss in Boots.
  • In the furrycomic book, Xanadu, the main male hero, Tabbe Le Fauve, is a cat modeled on Puss in Boots with a strong influence of Errol Flynn's typical swashbuckler character.
  • The webcomicNo Rest for the Wicked features several characters adapted from this story, Perrault (Puss), The Marquis de Carabas, and his wife.
  • HBO's Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child gave the story a Polynesian flavor.
  • Angela Carter offers an alternative, updated version of the tale in her collection of short stories The Bloody Chamber
  • A Meowth from the Pokémon anime series dresses up like Puss In Boots.
  • In Gainax's 2000 anime FLCL, the third episode is named Maru Raba (Marquis de Carabas) and deals with the young adult characters performing Puss in Boots at their school, and with one character and her interest in the idea of pretending to be something until you've become it.
  • "The New Traveller's Almanac," a companion to Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, places Carabas Castle (formerly Ogre Castle, where "a talking feline dressed in smashing footwear" ate the Ogre and inherited his riches) in Ardennes on the Belgian border, where also stood (among others) the castles of Bluebeard, the Beast and Rosamund. These castles were subsequently destroyed by shellfire in 1913 during the Great War.
  • In Neil Gaiman's novel Neverwhere, the Marquis de Carabas appears as a character and is merged with Puss.
  • The novel Reserved for the Cat by Mercedes Lackey is a retelling of Puss In Boots, set in her Elemental Masters series.
  • In the manga, MÄR Puss 'n' Boots becomes a form of Babbo in the final battle against the main antagonist, Phantom.
  • Puss in Boots is the fourth episode of the episode game series American McGee's Grimm, which features the dark version of the cat missing an eye and the queen rabbit in the dark version goes from an easter bunny type creature to a rabbit inspired by the xenomorph alien from the aliens franchise.
  • The Captain N: The Game Master episode "Once Upon a Time Machine" is based on Puss N Boots (though it mostly draws its inspiration from a video game adaptation of Toei's anime film.) [1]
  • La Véritable histoire du Chat botté is an animated French film (2009) by Jérôme Deschamps, Pascal Hérold and Macha Makeïeff.[3] Dubbed into English as The True History of Puss 'N Boots (2010), the voice actors include William Shatner.[dubious – discuss]
  • Puss in Boots appears in the Fables spin-off Cinderella: From Fabletown with Love. He is one of the animal Fables who has to live on Fabletown's "Farm."
  • Mary Hanson Roberts wrote and drew a long serial in the Furrloughanthropomorphic comic book, about the descendants of Puss in Boots and their adventures in their world's equivalent of the France of Louis XVI and the French Revolution, called "Here Comes a Candle." (The reference in the title is to the nursery rhyme that ends: "Here comes a candle to light you to bed; here comes a chopper to chop off your head.")
  • Nagagutsu o Haita Neko: Sekai Isshū 80 Nichi Dai Bōken, 1986 Japan-exclusive video game where the main character is Puss in Boots.
  • Puss in Boots is the main character of 2019 video game Puss in Boots: Fear Not Hooman, developed by Adana Softworks.
  • “Puss In Boots: A Musical,” a 2019 audiobook musical created by Edelman and Fishman and Khristine Hvam released by HarperAudio. It is narrated by Jim Dale and features a full ensemble.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adaptations_of_Puss_in_Boots
The Cat in Boots - Fairy Tales - Musical - PINKFONG Story Time for Children

Puss in Boots: The Three Diablos

2012 American film

Puss in Boots: The Three Diablos is a 2012 American computer-animated short adventurecomedy film, and a sequel to Puss in Boots. It was directed by Raman Hui and features Antonio Banderas as the voice of the title character. The short was released on February 24, 2012, attached as a bonus feature to the Puss in Boots DVD and Blu-ray (3D) release.[1] The short tells a story of Puss in Boots on a mission to recover a princess' stolen ruby from the notorious French thief the Whisperer. Reluctantly accompanied by three cute little kittens called the Three Diablos, Puss must tame them before they endanger the mission.

Plot[edit]

Some time after the Golden Goose incident, Puss in Boots is riding his horse through the desert contemplating the crossroads he found himself at -if he was destined to be an outlaw or a hero- when he is captured by Italian knights. He is then taken to Princess Alessandra Belagomba, whose "Heart of Fire" Ruby, the crown jewel of her kingdom, is missing. At first, Puss believes he is being wrongfully charged for the theft, but it later turns out that the Princess only wants to hire him based on his reputation, revealing that a French thief called "The Whisperer" was the one who committed the crime and that the Princess' knights have captured three of his henchmen. The henchmen turn out to be three kittens (referred to as the Diablos). Though Puss cannot believe that such innocent creatures could be thieves, the princess and her guards are terrified of them. The Diablos agree to help Puss on the premise that they will be free if they return the ruby.

When Puss takes the Diablos to the desert, they quickly turn on him (revealing their backstabbing nature) and bury him alive. Puss later escapes and recaptures the Diablos using his wide eyes against theirs. Later, he talks about sending them back to jail for double-crossing him, but he learns that they have no family and are orphans like him. He then sympathetically tells them how he also knows it's tough growing up not knowing whom to trust and being betrayed, making an example of how Humpty led him down the wrong path, just as the Whisperer has done to them. Puss then decides to point the Diablos in the right direction and trains them how to fight and plays with them, becoming friends. He also gives them names: Perla (because she is one of a kind), another Gonzalo (for his scrappy temper) and the other Sir Timoteo Montenegro the Third (a title is all he needs).

The next day, the Diablos, turning over a new leaf, show Puss to the Whisperer's secret hideout, and are immediately confronted by the Whisperer himself, who, by his name, has a low voice volume and uses his hat as a megaphone to speak clearly. It is also revealed that the Whisperer himself has used the heart as a decoration for his own belt. After learning that the Diablos brought Puss to him to recover the heart, the Whisperer is about to punish them for their betrayal, but Puss fights him and lets the Diablos escape. They, however, return to help Puss with what they learned from him and the Whisperer falls into a bottomless pit, Puss reclaiming the heart in the process. Puss then returns the heart to the Princess and is rewarded with gold, and he gives the Princess the Diablos as her new personal bodyguards. They then say their goodbyes and Puss claims "He will never forget them, just as he is sure they will never forget the name of Puss in-"; unfortunately, the guards slam the doors before he can finish his goodbye.

Voice cast[edit]

Release[edit]

Home media[edit]

The short film was released with Puss in Boots on February 24, 2012.[1]

Reception[edit]

Bret Marnell was nominated for Outstanding Achievement, Editorial in an Animated Television or other Broadcast Venue Production for his work on Puss in Boots: Three Diablos at the 40th Annual Annie Awards.[2]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puss_in_Boots:_The_Three_Diablos

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Puss in Boots (Shrek)

Fictional character in the Shrek franchise

Puss in Boots is a main character in the Shrek franchise, also being portrayed as the title character and protagonist of the film Puss in Boots (2011). He made his first appearance in the film Shrek 2 (2004), soon becoming Shrek's partner and helper (alongside Donkey). In the film Shrek the Third (2007), Puss helps Shrek find the heir to the throne of the Far Far Away Kingdom. The film Shrek Forever After (2010) is primarily set in an alternate universe, where Puss is Princess Fiona's pet and has gained weight after his retirement. In the spin-off and prequelPuss in Boots, his origins are described. Puss also appears in the Netflix television series centered on him, The Adventures of Puss in Boots (2015–2018).

Puss was inspired by the title character of the fairy tale "Puss in Boots". His design, created by Tom Hester, was based on real cats. Several characters were used as inspirations for Puss's characterization, such as Zorro and Indiana Jones. The idea of Puss as the protagonist of a film was explored after his debut appearance. Antonio Banderas voices Puss in the English, Spanish, and Italian dubs of the Shrek franchise. While he initially tried a high-pitched voice for the character, he and the Shrek 2 filmmakers decided on a tone that was deeper than his normal voice. Banderas said that voicing Puss was an important part of his career. Eric Bauza provides Puss's voice in The Adventures of Puss in Boots.

The character has received generally positive reviews, with critics praising his depiction and considering him a source of comic relief. Reviewers have regarded Puss as a popular Shrek character. Banderas's voice acting has also been praised. Merchandise inspired by the character has been produced.

Development[edit]

Concept and creation[edit]

Puss in Boots is inspired by the title character of the fairy tale with the same name.[1]Character designer Tom Hester provided Puss's design, which was based on cats owned by ShrekdirectorAndrew Adamson and effects supervisor Ken Bielenberg. After Antonio Banderas had been cast as Puss's voice, the Shrekanimators analyzed his performance as the title character in The Mask of Zorro (1998) for insight into Puss's depiction.[2] Inspired by Banderas's Zorro, the filmmakers decided to make Puss's origins Spanish (instead of the fairy tale's Italian).[3] When computer-animating Puss, new animation tools were required for his fur, belt, and the plume on his hat.[4]

Chris Miller, head of story of the film Shrek 2 (2004),[5][6][7] said that he enjoyed the character of Puss as much as viewers seemed to; he and everyone else involved in Shrek 2 wanted to add more scenes related to Puss to the film. Miller described Puss as "a really cool, dynamic sidekick character at that time", saying that the filmmakers had decided to link the character to a "weird history" in which he had been "everywhere" and done "everything".[8] He and the other filmmakers wondered what the story of Puss would look like and why he had his accent. According to Miller, writing and developing Puss had been "so much fun", and the character had a "huge impact" in Shrek 2 by stealing so many scenes.[8] Miller said that he had "always loved" the character and had been "fascinated by where Puss had been before".[9] Puss repeatedly mentions "some great adventure" (without details) in the Shrek films, and Miller wanted to know more about his origins (such as where his boots came from).[9] Miller called Puss his favorite Shrek character,[10] who had "always stood out",[9] and could not imagine anyone other than Banderas voicing him;[11] soon after the character had been created, Banderas was offered the role. Miller commented that the actor's performance was "pretty brilliant".[11]

After realizing at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival how much viewers enjoyed Puss's character, Jeffrey Katzenberg, co-founder of DreamWorks Animation,[12] began considering "the idea of possibly continuing with the character in the Shrek series" and creating a film with Puss as the protagonist.[13] Katzenberg called Puss a "scene stealer" and said he "seemed to beg for his own film" after his first appearance in the Shrek franchise.[14] Miller, who also directed the film Puss in Boots (2011),[15][16][17] knew that Puss was suitable for a standalone film,[10] and he was pleased when Banderas quickly accepted the role.[18] Miller was happy with DreamWorks's decision to create a film about Puss and excited to contribute to its production.[8] He said the idea of Puss having his own film had been considered since the character had joined the Shrek franchise, attributing this to "the size and scope of that character" and "the personality that Antonio infused that character with".[19] Although the filmmakers initially wanted to bring cats to the DreamWorks studios to study them for the development of Puss, the DreamWorks staff suggested watching YouTube cat videos instead. According to Miller, YouTube was the filmmakers' "great resource" of inspiration to which they added their "personal experience".[1] He said that cats, "as seriously as they take themselves", "can never resist their true nature", and he cited Puss's "hissing" as an example.[1]

The Puss in Boots filmmakers knew from the beginning that something about the character "demanded [the story] just be larger than life".[11] While the story had initially been conceptualized as "loosely based" on the classic fairy tale, involving "Puss and three sons of the miller", the filmmakers decided to create "a new story told on a grander scale", "something that would be more worthy of" Puss.[17] "Spaghetti Western style and structure" also inspired Puss's character,[9] and the filmmakers decided to use "big screen legends" as inspiration.[9] Miller cited Clint Eastwood as one of the "classic cinematic figures" inspiring Puss's portrayal and regarded him as "a strong force" since there was "something about Clint that was in the cat".[11] He also cited Indiana Jones's "adventurous spirit", James Bond and Errol Flynn.[11] Miller also cited Zorro as an inspiration for Puss since Banderas (who played Zorro) voiced him,[11] and he said that "Antonio's persona [had] really dictated so many of the choices that [had been] made" about Puss's character in Puss in Boots.[1] According to Miller, it is "very difficult to tell the difference" between Puss and Banderas.[20]

The filmmakers decided to give Puss "a heavy story" in Puss in Boots;[8] they felt that breaking his heart would be "really important", and they wanted to offer him "something to redeem himself from and clear his name".[8] They debated whether Puss would be portrayed as a misunderstood fugitive. Miller said that although Puss could have been depicted as deceptive, the filmmakers had decided to portray him as blameworthy; robbing the bank was not Puss's plan and he ran away "out of fear", but he had to take responsibility for his actions.[8] Miller stated that Puss's "desire to believe the best in someone else" and to "hang on to a friendship" represent "the kind of things that get him in trouble".[21] Puss's backstory was meant to indicate the "heaviness on his mind and in his heart", and why he was on the run despite his "cool life".[8] Miller said that Puss was a "pretty wide open" character when it came to his portrayal in the film;[9] Puss adds a dramatic note to everything, which the filmmakers used "to attach a very tragic story to his life".[9] Miller stated that "the heavy dramatic themes" fit Puss's character well, making the character's journey a "story of redemption" in which "he sort of walks a dark path with a hole punched in his heart" and wishes "to clear away the sins of his past" and "reclaim what was his".[9] Miller said that Puss in his cape affirmed "an urban legend";[1] although he wore it in marketing material, he rarely did so in the films. According to Miller, Puss's cape was "so expensive to keep strapped to that cat" and "so cumbersome" that the Puss in Boots filmmakers decided to have the character wear it for a short time, as in Shrek 2.[1] Miller felt that Puss's "giant big eyes" would appeal to viewers.[19]Puss in Bootsexecutive producerGuillermo del Toro said that Puss would be taken "to a completely different land which is very exotic" in the future adventure filmPuss in Boots 2, since Miller wanted the film to be set in a visually-different universe than Shrek's.[22]

Doug Langdale, executive producer of the television series The Adventures of Puss in Boots (2015–2018),[23][24][25] said that in the series Puss fights "a lot more" compared to the films;[26] he is depicted "more as a master swordsman with lots of extra punching, kicking and action".[26] Langdale stated that he "wanted to set the show earlier in Puss's life, back when he was the only one who thought he was a legend ... had more to prove, and maybe [was not] quite so awesome at everything yet", which determined that the series would be set before the film Puss in Boots.[27] He said that since Puss is a "hero", the series focuses on his saving people and defeating "bad guys".[26] Langdale added that in the series, "unexpected depth and nuance" are brought to the character with comedy;[26] Puss was a "nomad" and a "loner" before the events of the series, which "is an essential segment in Puss's life" that taught him "how to get along with other people" and made him "understand the value of friendships and relationships".[26] According to Langdale, "the audience [would] willingly follow" Puss's "charm, charisma and appeal".[26]

Voice[edit]

Antonio Banderas voiced Puss in the Shrek franchise.[2][28][30] Banderas said that his initial motivation to voice Puss was that he enjoyed the film Shrek (2001).[31] According to the actor, he was chosen for the role of Puss because of his Spanish accent.[32] According to Banderas, he was on Broadway for the musical Nine when Jeffrey Katzenberg approached him about taking the role.[33] The Shrek 2 filmmakers showed him "a lot of paintings of the character", and he realized how "little" Puss was.[34] Banderas said that he had developed a strategy for playing Puss after accepting the role, which had determined Puss's personality.[35] Although he could have used a high-pitched voice for Puss, which was the filmmakers' original idea,[33] he and the others working on the film opted for a tone that was "deeper" and "more breathy" than his normal voice.[13][35] Banderas called the choice "very interesting", adding that it "helped to establish the limits and the parameters of the character in terms of personality".[35] He regarded the effect as "almost like a lion trapped in the body of a little cat", which makes Puss "different".[35] According to the actor, Puss's voice contrasts with his body; he stated that "the cat is not supposed to talk like that", adding that the difference between Puss's voice and appearance is comic relief.[13] He also commented that the contrast between Puss's appearance and voice makes it seem like he is not even aware of his size.[33] Banderas said that after the decision about Puss's voice had been made, the filmmakers had begun depicting the character "in a totally different way".[35] He added that Puss had initially been conceptualized as "quite a little character" but had started gaining more importance after the filmmakers had realized his potential.[35] Banderas said that he and the filmmakers had "a lot of fun" with Puss's character, and felt that viewers did too.[22]

Banderas said that the first scene he had recorded was coughing up a hairball, adding that he had spent "45 minutes doing strange sounds";[29][32] although it left him voiceless,[29][32] he saw the moment as "fun".[29] When asked about the most difficult part of voicing Puss, Banderas said "the biggest challenge was to understand the animation process".[29] The actor said that in addition to providing Puss's English voice, he voiced the character in Mexican Spanish, Castilian Spanish, and Italian, calling the Italian dub "the most challenging" since he had to follow "the character's face movement";[29] Puss speaks with a lisp in the Spanish dub.[29] When he was at the Cannes Film Festival for Shrek 2, Banderas noticed that Puss's character received much public attention.[35] About Puss's changed appearance in Shrek Forever After (2010), Banderas joked that the character's weight gain did not bother him but the pink ribbon (which Puss wears in the film) did. For Puss in Boots, Banderas advised the filmmakers to depict the relation between Puss and Kitty Softpaws (voiced by Salma Hayek) as a "love-hate" relationship to generate "a great lot of comedy";[29] Hayek stated that Banderas is completely believable as Puss since both are "very self-confident", characterizing him as perfect for this role.[36] Banderas said that he wanted Puss to keep "his mischievousness and edginess" in this film since viewers enjoyed "the edgy side" of the character.[29]

Asked about similarities between him and Puss, Banderas said that Puss had values which he lacked; the character was "too courageous".[35] He said that the filmmakers had wanted to incorporate some of his "personal features" into Puss's character, with characters he had played in other films, such as Zorro and the characters he had portrayed in Desperado (1995) and The 13th Warrior (1999), serving as inspirations.[35] Banderas said that he saw "a little bit more" of himself as the films in which Puss appears were released,[35] describing Puss as his "alter ego".[20] He is proud that his character is Latino since it is "good for diversity and cultural interaction", saying children would see that "heroes actually have a strong accent" in Puss in Boots.[13]

Banderas said that he loved Puss's character.[35] Asked about which one of Puss's characteristics he preferred, the actor cited his mischievousness; according to Banderas, Puss does amazing things in the three Shrek films in which he appears. Playing Puss meant "a lot" for his career;[29] although he had not been able to speak English when he had come to America, the filmmakers wanted his voice for the films.[29][32] Banderas said he had not initially known how difficult voicing a character was, stating that "you have to get into the character" to do it well.[29] The Shrek franchise was important to him, representing "the magnificent part of Hollywood and the search for perfection";[29] Banderas viewed being a part of the Shrek production as "very beautiful".[29] He was recognized in public for his role as Puss.[32]

Eric Bauza voiced Puss in the Netflix series The Adventures of Puss in Boots.[37][38][39] Bauza said that he had auditioned "fair and square" for Puss's role (despite having worked with executive producer Doug Langdale on another show) and had enjoyed working with the production team.[40] He said he had been asked to do a motion capture as Puss before the start of the series, adding that "to embody that character, physically, was so tough".[40] Bauza called the sounds he needed to provide for Puss "iconic" since he is "such a well-known character".[40] According to Bauza, voicing Puss was a "challenge because Puss speaks in such a whisper".[41] Bauza said that he had "watched a lot of Antonio's films", had imagined how he would have performed on certain occasions, and had tried to be as "unpredictable";[40] he stated that his voice is similar to Banderas's. Since he voiced the central character in the series, Bauza had "the luck and luxury to be able to record with a majority of the people that are in the show".[40] He felt that "having the responsibility of taking over a role such as Puss in Boots is quite the honor".[40] Bauza thought that a series centered on Puss was clever, maintaining the audience interested until the release of Puss in Boots 2, and said it would present "some sides to Puss that you [cannot] really get out of the feature films or even shorts".[40]André Sogliuzzo voiced Puss in several Shrek video games.[42] The meowingsounds Puss makes in the films were provided by Frank Welker.[43]

Characterization[edit]

Miller characterized Puss as "a fiercely loyal and honorable cat".[8] He further referred to Puss as "a pint-sized, pocket-sized, fun character".[8] Miller also described Puss as "really appealing" and also as "a normally proportioned cat dressed up, but bold, animated, and romantic".[9] He viewed Puss as "colorful" as well.[1] Miller stated that "Antonio's persona and this explosive, dynamic, huge figure that was really cute" completely fit Puss's portrayal in Puss in Boots.[8] He also said Puss is an "amplified version of Antonio coming out of this tiny little fury package" and that this makes him an "instantly funny", "intriguing", and "complex character".[11] He added that Puss "is very melodramatic", seeing this as "funny" because of how Puss's character is depicted and believing Banderas was "really good" at portraying this side of the character.[8] He further said Puss "is at his funniest when he takes himself too seriously", which always happens since he "sees himself as a very important figure".[9] Miller stated that while Puss has a "really big heart", he still is somewhat mischievous.[9] Miller characterized Puss as someone who had seen "the light really early in life" and who is "affecting change on everyone around him".[44] He further described him as "half lover, half fighter" and as "a bit roguish and a bit of a troublemaker".[44] Miller also characterized Puss as "unpredictable".[45]

Langdale said that Puss is a "character anyone can relate to", which makes him "great".[46] He said that "on the surface, Puss is the coolest guy in the world", "great at everything", "saves and protects people", and "seems like he can defeat anyone", despite "this wonderful vulnerability" due to him being "tiny".[26] According to Langdale, Puss is "just a regular-sized cat in a people-sized world" with an "elephant-sized" personality.[26]

Banderas described Puss as "a little bit mysterious", with "a sweetness";[20] he added that the character "knows how to make people jealous" and "can be manipulative with just his eyes".[20] According to Banderas, viewers could identify with Puss's attempts to obtain something.[20] Banderas said that Puss is a "womanizer" who courts "the lady cats",[29] and enjoys having a female "in front of him that can fight as hard as him".[35] He stated that Puss is "so little", and the actor enjoyed his "contrast in size" with Shrek.[29]

Appearances[edit]

Shrek 2[edit]

Main article: Shrek 2

Puss makes his first appearance as a supporting character in the film Shrek 2,[2] where he is initially hired by the father of Princess Fiona (Shrek's wife) to kill Shrek. He meets Shrek and his companion, Donkey, and unsuccessfully attacks Shrek. Puss tells Shrek the reason for his attack and begs for mercy. Because Shrek spares his life, Puss offers to join him and becomes his partner. During the course of the film, Puss helps Shrek to obtain a potion that turns Shrek and Fiona into humans, attacks a group of guards to buy Shrek time to save Fiona, and befriends Shrek and Donkey. At the end of the film, Puss sings a duet with Donkey.[47][48][49]

Shrek the Third[edit]

Main article: Shrek the Third

In the film Shrek the Third (2007), Puss travels with Shrek and Donkey to bring Fiona's cousin, Arthur Pendragon, to the Far Far Away Kingdom so he can become the new king (instead of Shrek). During their journey, Puss gives Shrek advice. In a later teleportation spell, Puss has his body switched with Donkey's. After initial difficulty getting used to their new bodies, Puss and Donkey join forces in the battle against Prince Charming to save Shrek, and they convince Arthur that he is meant to be king. Puss and Donkey regain their own bodies and, in an end-of-film ellipsis, Puss and other characters care for Shrek and Fiona's children.[50][51][52]

Shrek Forever After[edit]

Main article: Shrek Forever After

Puss is present in the film Shrek Forever After, at the beginning of which he attends the first birthday party of Shrek and Fiona's children. In the alternate universe created by the film's antagonist, Rumpelstiltskin, and entered by Shrek, Puss has gained weight and is Fiona's pet after his retirement. Realizing that Shrek and Fiona have feelings for each other, Puss becomes Shrek's friend. When Shrek, Fiona, and the other ogres in this universe are captured at Rumpelstiltskin's behest, Puss and Donkey save Shrek and Fiona; Puss is a key participant in the later battle against Rumpelstiltskin and his allies. Shrek returns to the real universe, where Puss (as his usual self) enjoys the birthday party with the other characters.[53][54][55]

Puss in Boots[edit]

Main article: Puss in Boots (2011 film)

The film Puss in Boots is a spin-off from, and prequel to, the Shrek films.[56][57][58] It begins by presenting Puss's aliases, including "Diablo Gato",[59] "The Furry Lover",[59] "Chupacabra",[59] "Frisky Two Times",[60] and "The Ginger Hit Man".[60] After he was abandoned when he was little, Puss finds shelter at an orphanage in the town of San Ricardo and is adopted by Imelda. He becomes friends with Humpty Alexander Dumpty, who gives him the name "Puss" and with whom he decides to find the magic beans that would bring them to the Golden Goose (which lays golden eggs). Puss performs a heroic act, for which he receives acclaim and his boots. His bond with Humpty begins to fray, and Humpty compels Puss to (unknowingly) rob a bank with him. Puss leaves San Ricardo; years later, he learns who owns the magic beans and plans to steal them. He meets a cat who also wants to steal them: Kitty Softpaws, Humpty's partner. Humpty asks Puss to join them in their search for the beans, and Puss eventually accepts. They find the beans, plant them, and a beanstalk brings them to a castle in the sky. They find the Golden Goose and return with it to the ground. Puss returns to San Ricardo, where he realizes that Humpty has been plotting against him. Puss is arrested, and he learns that the Golden Goose's mother will come and try to retrieve it. With Kitty's help, Puss escapes, goes to Humpty, and they reconcile. Humpty sacrifices himself to allow Puss to save the Golden Goose and return it to its mother (preventing the town's destruction), and Puss and Kitty escape the town guards.[61][62][63]

Other appearances[edit]

Puss is present in the short filmFar Far Away Idol (2004), singing a part of the song "These Boots Are Made for Walking";[64][65] he also appears in his own music video of this song.[64][65] Puss is present in the television specialShrek the Halls (2007), going with other characters to Shrek's home to celebrate Christmas and telling a Christmas story.[66][67][68] He also appears in the television special Scared Shrekless (2010), participating in a storytelling contest to frighten Shrek on Halloween; Puss tells a story with Donkey, but they cannot agree on a version.[69][70][71] Puss appears in the short film Donkey's Caroling Christmas-tacular (2010), singing his version of the song "Feliz Navidad".[72] Puss is also present in the short film Thriller Night (2011), in which a zombie version of him is shown.[73] He also appears in the short film Puss in Boots: The Three Diablos (2012), training three kittens and leading them to the right path.[74][75][76] Puss is the protagonist of the Netflix series The Adventures of Puss in Boots, protecting the city of San Lorenzo from intruders after accidentally breaking the spell that was meant to defend it;[38][77][78] he is also present in Puss in Book: Trapped in an Epic Tale (2017), a television special included in the series.[79][80][81] He will appear in the future film Puss in Boots 2 as well.[82][83][84] Puss is present in DreamWorksTV's vlog-style short webisodes.[85] He has appeared on Jeopardy!, being the first computer-animated character to provide an entire category in the show.[86][87] Puss can be seen in a commercial parodying an Old Spice advertisement.[88][89][90]

Puss is a playable character in several Shrekvideo games, such as Shrek 2,[91][92]Shrek the Third,[93][94]Shrek Forever After,[95][96]Puss in Boots,[97][98]Shrek SuperSlam,[99][100]Shrek Smash n' Crash Racing,[101]Shrek n' Roll,[102]Shrek 2: Beg for Mercy,[103]Shrek's Carnival Craze Party Games,[104] and Shrek Kart.[105][106] He also appears in the video games Shrek: Dragon's Tale,[107]Shrek the Third: Arthur's School Day Adventure,[108] and Shrek the Third: The Search for Arthur.[109]Fruit Ninja: Puss in Boots, another video game based on Puss, has also been released.[110][111][112]

He makes a cameo appearance in Shrek The Musical.[113] Puss has appeared in a stage show at the Duluth Depot.[114][115] He has also been portrayed in a show at the Universal Studios Singaporetheme park,[116] and a figurine of the character has been displayed at the entrance of the Puss in Boots' Giant Journeyroller coaster at the same park.[117][118] Another figurine of Puss is atop a swing ride inspired by the character, Puss in Boots Sword Swing, located at Australia's Dreamworld theme park.[119] Meet-and-greet sessions containing Puss have taken place.[120][121][122]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Critical reception of Puss has been generally positive, with reviewers praising his portrayal in the films and describing him as "cute",[123][124][125][126] "suave",[18][40][127][128] "lovable",[75][129][130] "charismatic",[40][131] "feisty",[132][133] "engaging",[134] "legendary",[135] "an instant charmer",[17] "a natural-born star",[136] "a notorious adventurer",[2] the "suavest of swashbuckling cats",[137] and "the world's greatest feline swordfighter".[138] He was also regarded as "smooth-talking",[139][140] "heroic",[141] "honorable",[142] self-confident,[143] "passionate",[144] loyal,[143] with "humble" origins.[11]Collider's Christina Radish described Puss as "charming and unforgettable", adding that he "was a cat destined for great things".[8] Radish said that Puss getting his own film was no surprise, commenting that the character has a "tremendous heart",[8] and is a "much-loved fighter".[40]Fantasy Magazine's Andrew Penn Romine called Puss "equal parts rogue and hero",[9] but Stephen Holden of The New York Times described the character as "this vain, spoiled, swashbuckler".[145] According to Holden, Puss is not "as clear-cut a personality [in Puss in Boots] as he was" in the Shrek films.[145]IndieLondon's Rob Carnevale called him a "cheeky feline swashbuckler" and Puss in Boots's "enigmatic central character".[131]Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter described Puss as a "dashing little kitty centerstage", "ever-bold",[62] and "a self-deprecating, sometimes bumbling but ultimately dashing swordsman".[62] McCarthy enjoyed Puss's "vigorous physicality" in Puss in Boots.[62]Neil Genzlinger of The New York Times called Puss "endearing", "dashing and fearless but also a tad reckless".[132] Chrissy Iley of The Telegraph described him as "the world's most seductive animated cat".[20]IGN's Andy Patrizio enjoyed Puss in Shrek 2,[146] and Scott Collura of the same website said that Puss "remains dignified and cool" in Shrek Forever After despite his weight gain.[147] The character has been regarded as a source of comic relief.[58][128][140][148]

Critics have stated that Puss is similar to Zorro,[28][47][48][49][129][130] and he was called "a glorious reimagining of the swashbuckling charm of Zorro".[143] Reviewers have also said that Puss resembles Captain Jack Sparrow from the film series Pirates of the Caribbean,[149][150] because of him being a "swashbuckling",[149] "charismatic scene-stealer".[150] Puss has also been commented to share similarities with the characters Don Juan,[151][152][153]Pepé Le Pew,[154][155][156] and Tarzan.[157]

The character's design has been discussed and praised, with Jesse Hassenger of PopMatters calling Puss a "spry, well-dressed" cat.[140]Comic Book Resources writer Rob Levin described him as "a legend in his own right", with an "upright strut and leather boots".[1]Christy Lemire of Boston.com said that Puss "looks so soft and fluffy and tactile in his little, leather boots, his ... feathered hat and his shiny sword";[158] she described him as "a tabby cat decked out in tiny Zorro duds".[159] Todd McCarthy called Puss "a short orange critter with green eyes, feathered hat and large boots",[62] and A. O. Scott of The New York Times praised his "convincingly animated fur".[142] Puss's hat has been described as "jaunty",[158][160] and as a "d'Artagnan hat".[157] Graham Young of the Birmingham Post stated that Puss in Boots was "one of the most entertaining animations" he had ever seen, citing Puss's "wondrous", "little teeth" as a contributing factor to this.[161] The character has been regarded as "tiny",[45][162] with a Spin South West writer calling him "small in stature, but huge in personality".[26]

Puss's ability to trick his opponents with his eyes has also been praised, with NJ.com writer Mark Voger describing it as Puss's "sympathy-winning big-eyes technique".[76] Katharine M. Rogers wrote in her book titled Cat that while Puss is "an ostentatiously fierce swashbuckler", he is also able to "instantly melt any opponent by gazing at him", using his "steady, confiding gaze";[134] she thought that Puss's eyes "seem to consist entirely of warmly dark, liquid pupils".[134] James Mottram of The National viewed the way Puss was "widening his eyes and mewing" as his "main weapon", referring to it as "a comic gem that, wisely, the filmmakers only resort to once" (in Puss in Boots) and feeling this is a detail that makes the film a delight.[148] Ben Sherlock of Screen Rant regarded Puss as "popular" and said that "his technique of looking adorable with gigantic eyes to get his opponents to drop their guard before launching an attack on them" never fails.[163] Jesse Hassenger described Puss as a "swashbuckling cat with the trappings of an actual feline, like purring and looking adorable to disarm enemies".[140] Hassenger called Puss's eyes "big", "cute", and "not always easy to resist" (despite their purpose being "visible").[140] Graham Young described Puss's eyes as "emerald mince pies".[161]Empire's Dan Jolin called the character's "dilated-pupils" a "cute act",[164] and another Empire writer also praised Puss's ability to widen his eyes.[143] Nev Pierce of the BBC described his eyes as "cutesy" and "saucer-like".[165]IGN writer Jeff Otto wrote that Puss "can give the most adorable wide-eyed look" to "lure" his enemies into "his vicious swashbuckling attacks".[129] Christy Lemire praised that Puss is "working those big, green eyes for maximum manipulative effect".[158] Puss's "big eyes" were also described as a running gag.[166]

Reviewers have provided comments regarding the character's popularity. Steven Lebowitz of AXS said that Puss was "just as popular as Shrek",[31] and Joseph Airdo of the same website called him "arguably the most popular" character in the Shrek franchise.[63] Ashley Rodriguez of Quartz also described Puss as a "popular Shrek character".[167]Tech Times writer Robin Parrish called Puss "everyone's favorite Shrek sidekick".[27] Christina Radish characterized Puss as an "adorable little creature" who had become "a fan favorite in the Shrek films",[13] and Quickflix's Simon Miraudo called him one of the franchise's "signature characters".[11] Rob Carnevale stated that Puss was "the real star of the franchise" to many Shrek fans.[131] Andrew Penn Romine said that he is "one of the most popular characters in recent animation history".[9] Marc Savlov of The Austin Chronicle felt that Puss was "the freshest and sharpest ... surprise" of Shrek 2;[123] he was described as this "film's most delightful new character",[168] "the most hilarious new character",[169] the "most memorable character",[129] "the most fantastic addition of all",[159] "the franchise's greatest character",[170] and "the best character of all".[171] Stephen Holden wrote that although Puss "has his charms", "he is not as memorable a character as Shrek or Shrek's mouthy sidekick, Donkey",[145] and Matt Fowler of IGN described him as "perhaps better suited as a side character".[61] Puss was ranked 11th on Empire's top 50 animated film characters list.[143]

Critics have praised Banderas's voicing. Rob Levin said that Puss has "a decidedly Latin flavor" in the Shrek films because of Banderas, who "plays the part with gusto, giving the tiny hero all the bravado and charm of his real-life persona".[1] According to Andrew Penn Romine, Banderas voiced Puss "with feline gravitas".[9] Rob Carnevale called Banderas's performance "inimitable".[131]IAmRogue's Dana Gardner wrote that Banderas "brought plenty of comedy to the role of Puss by playing the character so melodramatically".[172] Matt Fowler found Banderas "perfectly suitable as Puss",[61] and Todd McCarthy called his performance "spirited and knowing".[62] James Mottram praised "Banderas's charm" as well.[148] Graham Young felt that Banderas's performance improved Shrek 2, resembling his acting in The Mask of Zorro,[161] and Chrissy Iley described Puss as "a feline spoof of [Banderas's] Zorro character".[20] Donna Bowater of The Telegraph called Banderas's performance "famous".[173] Jeff Otto said that Banderas "lends a fantastic energy to the character", making viewers "wish for more of him".[129]Alan Jones of Radio Times also enjoyed Banderas's voice acting.[174] According to an Empire reviewer, Puss was "voiced to perfection by Banderas".[143] In the book titled Stars in World Cinema: Screen Icons and Star Systems Across Cultures, the authors wrote that the "European roots" of the fairy tale "Puss in Boots" were "revived through the presence of Banderas".[175] They stated that while Banderas's "on-screen persona" had been based on "his sensuality and body image", he then exchanged this representation for the image of "an animated ginger cat".[175] The writers also commented that Puss's voice "was intended to speak to the audience's [internalized] views regarding accent and regional profile";[175] they said it was "vital" for Puss "not to belong to the dominant cultural group" despite being "adopted into that group".[175] In his book titled The Animated Movie Guide, author Jerry Beck wrote that Banderas voiced Puss with "a Castilian accent" in the Latin American version and with "an Andalusian accent" in the Spanish version;[176] he mentioned that both accents sounded "funny" to their respective target audiences.[176]Entertainment Weekly's Maureen Lee Lenker said that Puss had become a "fan favorite" after his first appearance in the Shrek franchise, mostly because of Banderas's "smooth Spanish accent";[34] the "tie-in" with Banderas was stated to "largely" contribute to Puss's popularity.[2]

Merchandise[edit]

Merchandise based on the character has been released, including plush toys.[177] The company Funko has launched vinyl figures depicting Puss.[178][179]McDonald's toys inspired by Puss have also been produced.[180][181]Pez candy dispensers based on Puss have been created as well.[182]Backpacks that portray Puss on their print have been released, and articles of clothing inspired by him have also been produced.[183] A Monopoly game based on Puss and other Shrek characters has been invented.[178]

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puss_in_Boots_(Shrek)


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