Ratchet set snap on

Ratchet set snap on DEFAULT

Snap On Ratcheting Wrenches low quality???

Nch said:

The ratcheting ends feel junky

Any opinions?

Click to expand


If they are new, send them back for a new set. Snap on also just re-released new models in both 0 and 15 degree offset/reversible so you may want to try those. The latest ones I believe are marked USA.

If you bought used off ebay they may be lemons or rejects, waranty returs etc. Those are really the two main options.

Snap on will refund you % if you actualy bought from them so its not really an issue.

As an aside, it is weird that the [old] ratcheting wrenches are not stamped USA. Its also weird that the ratcheting models are likely built to slightly different spec (than the combos and true aerospace wrenches), at least some of them seem build different from what I've seen.

But its also true good copies seem to be still among the best wrenches out there. Ratcheting wrenches are a bit of a tricky business because they are expensive and fragile, and the armstrong/matco etc alternatives are similarly prices with similar limitations.

If you are happy with a cheaper option, you may be better off buying snap on regular combos if you like the shape. If you don't like the shape and handling of cheaper ratcheting wrenches, the truck brands are all expensive and have similar tradeoffsYMMv

 

Sours: https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/threads/snap-on-ratcheting-wrenches-low-quality/

Socket wrenches and ratchets from Snap-on

Better materials for better tools

All Snap-on ratchets are made of alloy steel and feature precision machined gears, springs and pawls. The sockets have exclusive advantages such as Flank Drive® for up to 20% more torque and less slip.

1/4" for space-critical applications

It's the small details that make a big difference when it comes to working in tight spaces. The "Snap-on ¼" tools have been developed for these situations and facilitate access to hard-to-reach areas. The flat design of ratchets, wrenches and extensions makes places accessible where other tools cannot.

3/8" models for almost any job

The versatile ratchets and socket wrenches are suitable for almost any application. The Snap-on range has tools you can rely on every day, year after year.

½" for the robust use

Work smoothly, regardless of the application. Snap-on ½" ratchets are versatile, reliable and durable. The tools are rigorously tested to ensure they can withstand the most demanding applications.

¾" for heavy equipment

Heavy-duty applications require reliable tools. With Snap-on ¾" tools, you can tackle the heaviest machines, tractors, skip loaders and more.

1" - 2 ½" Ratchets and socket wrenches for large tasks

For the largest and most robust applications, large and robust tools are required. Whether construction machinery, hydraulics or other heavy challenges, these tools provide the extra power to finish the job.

Sours: https://www.snapon-industrial.co.uk/socket-wrenches-and-ratchets.html
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Sockets and Drive Tools

Snap-on continued to improve its sockets throughout the s and beyond, although the pace of change wasn't as rapid as it had been in the s. The more notable improvements included the introduction of hot-broached construction, more refined polished chrome finishes, the Loxocket locking mechanism for larger drives, and drive-wall recesses for 1/2-drive and smaller. In addition, numerous cosmetic changes were made to the socket styles, giving the sockets an updated appearance every few years.

In addition to the improvements in socket construction, the number of applications for sockets expanded greatly, and Snap-on offered a much greater selection of sockets. Drive sizes included 9/32 (later 1/4), 3/8, 1/2, 3/4, 1 inch, and even inches. Sockets were offered in shallow and deep styles, and with hex or double-hex (and sometimes double-square) broachings. The introduction of air-powered impact wrenches lead to a need for special impact-grade sockets, and the growing use of metric sizes required special sockets.

Early Reversible Ratchets

One of Snap-on's most important innovations for the s was the development of their high-strength reversible ratchet mechanism.


Snap-on F 3/8-Drive Ratchet

We'll begin this section with a very early example of a Snap-on reversible ratchet.

[Snap-on F 3/8-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on F 3/8-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side View,

Fig. shows an early 3/8-drive Snap-on F ratchet, with markings "Snap-on Kenosha, Wis." forged into the shank, and with "Patent Appl'd For" forged into the reverse.

The overall length is inches. The original finish was chrome plating, though most has been lost to wear and rust.

The reverse is stamped with two date codes, an asterisk symbol "*" for on the head, and the four-cornered symbol for on the cover plate. (See middle inset.)

The patent pending notation on the ratchet corresponds to patent #1,,, filed by L.A. Hummel in and issued in with assignment to Snap-on. This important patent formed the basis for most of the reversible ratchets produced by Snap-on, and ratchets of this same design remain in production today.

This early ratchet uses a somewhat fragile "S" shaped spring to provide the bias on the pawl, as is described in the patent document. These "S" springs are subject to wear from rubbing on the pawl and cover plate, causing eventual breakage; in addition, the spring can easily be lost if the ratchet is disassembled for repair.


Snap-on No. 71 1/2-Drive Ratchet

[Snap-on No. 71 1/2-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on No. 71 1/2-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side View,

Fig. shows an early 1/2-drive Snap-on No. 71 reversible ratchet, with "Snap-on Kenosha, Wis." in raised letters forged into the shank, and with "Patent Applied For" forged into the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is polished chrome.

The reverse face plate is stamped with the date code for , a four-cornered symbol resemling a diamond but with the sides bowed inward.

As with the previous example, the patent applied notice on the ratchet corresponds to patent #1,,, issued to L.A. Hummel in with assignment to Snap-on.


Snap-on No. 71A 1/2-Drive Ratchet

By Snap-on had started marking their patent number on the ratchets, as the next several examples will show.

[Snap-on No. 71A 1/2-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on No. 71A 1/2-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side View,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on No. 71A reversible ratchet, marked on the shank with the Snap-on logo and "Kenosha, Wis." in raised letters, with a "Pat. No. " patent notice forged into the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The top face is stamped with a stylized "4" date code for , placed between the "On" and "Off" markings below the shift lever.

The patent notice refers to the Hummel patent #1,, mentioned previously.


Snap-on FA 3/8-Drive Ratchet

Our last example for this section will show a model externally similar to previous examples, but with a detent ball instead of an S-spring.

[Snap-on FA 3/8-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on FA 3/8-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Side View and Reverse,

Fig. shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on FA ratchet, marked with the Snap-on logo and "Kenosha Wis." forged into the shank, and with "Patent No. " forged into the reverse.

The overall length is inches. The finish is plain steel for the body with chrome plating on the cover plate, though most has been lost due to wear.

The face is stamped with a stylized "5" date code for , placed between the "On" and "Off" markings below the shift lever.

The patent notation on the ratchet refers to the Hummel patent #1,, mentioned previously. But did any readers notice the discrepancy between this paragraph and the previously recorded patent number? The patent number forged into the handle of this ratchet is incorrect, as the last two digits have been transposed! This sort of problem is actually fairly common, but hadn't been noted previously for a Snap-on tool.

In this ratchet the original "S" spring for the pawl bias has been replaced by a detent ball seated in the handle. The detent ball proved to be a much more reliable mechanism for the pawl action, and remains in use today on ratchets of this type. Interestingly though, earlier versions of the FA model from still used the S-spring, so that the changeover to detent balls occurred within this model series.


1/2-Drive Sockets and Tools

After our introduction to the reversible ratchets, we'll turn now to Snap-on's 1/2-drive tools, their "Standard" size and the ones generally most familiar (and available).


Snap-on 1/2-Drive Dh 13/16 Socket

Readers familiar with the Snap-on sockets of the s might wonder what happened to the trusty tapered-wall sockets of that time. These socket models, numbered from through /2 in the old system, had been updated with double-hex broachings in the late s. The Snap-on catalogs of the s continued to list this style of socket as a 1/2-drive DH-xxx series, yet despite being offered at least through the late s, examples of this style of socket are relatively uncommon.

The next several figures will show examples of the DH-series 1/2-drive sockets.

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH 13/16 Inch Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH 13/16 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on Dh 13/16 socket, marked with the model number and Snap-on logo. The socket is also marked with overstamped date codes, a "0" date code for and an "*" for , as shown in the lower right inset.

The finish is a thin nickel plating, with losses due to wear.

The right inset shows the broaching opening. The walls have chatter marks typical of cold-broached construction, and the area below the broaching is recessed for chip removal.


Snap-on 1/2-Drive Dh/2 1 Inch Sockets

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH/2 1 Inch Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH/2 1 Inch Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on Dh/2 1 inch socket, marked with the model number and Snap-on logo. The socket is also marked with overstamped date code symbols for and

The finish is chrome plating with polished upper walls.

The right inset shows the broaching opening. The walls have chatter marks typical of cold-broached construction, and the area below the broaching is recessed for chip removal.


[Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH/2 1 Inch Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH/2 1 Inch Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows another example of the Snap-on Dh/2 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a stylized "4" date code for Oddly though, the "DH" prefix to the model number has been omitted on this example, but clearly it is a double-hex tapered-wall socket, nearly identical to the previous figure.

The finish is chrome plating with polished upper walls.

The right inset shows the broaching opening, with chatter marks on the walls and a recessed area below the broaching, typical of cold-broached construction.


Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH 5/8 Socket

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH 5/8 Inch Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive DH 5/8 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on Dh 5/8 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo plus a "Pat." notice, and with a stylized "4" date code for

The original finish has been lost, but was probably a thin chrome plating.

The right inset shows the broaching opening. Although not apparent in the photograph, the walls have chatter marks typical of cold-broached construction.


Snap-on 1/2-Drive [S] 9/16 Deep Socket

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive S 9/16 Deep Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive [S] 9/16 Deep Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows an early 1/2-drive Snap-on [S] 9/16 deep socket, stamped with the Snap-on logo on one side, with "0" and "*" overstruck date codes on the reverse (see top inset). This early socket is not marked with a model number, but would be a model S in the later numbering.

The overall height is inches, and the finish is plain steel.


Snap-on 1/2-Drive [S/2] 1 Inch Deep Socket

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive {S 1/2} 1 Inch Deep Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive [S 1/2] 1 Inch Deep Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows an early 1/2-drive Snap-on [S 1/2] 1 inch deep socket, stamped with the Snap-on logo on one side with a "*" date code for on the reverse. This early socket is not marked with a model number, but would be a model S 1/2 in the later numbering.

The overall height is inches, and the finish is cadmium plating. (Cadmium plating was the standard finish for )

The extra "1/2" suffix to the model number was used for the S-series sockets from S 1/2 (15/16) and larger, although the reasons are a bit unclear. Snap-on 1/2-drive sockets from the s needed an extra "1/2" suffix to avoid a model number conflict with the 5/8-drive sockets, but the S-series deep sockets weren't offered until some years later, enough time to plan ahead for model numbers.


Snap-on S 1/2-Drive 3/4 Deep Socket

By the deep sockets were being marked with their model numbers, as the next figure illustrates.

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive S 3/4 Deep Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive S 3/4 Deep Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on S 3/4 deep socket, stamped with the Snap-on logo, model number, and size on the front, with a stylized "4" date code for on the reverse.

The overall height is inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished walls.


Snap-on S-T 1/2-Drive Deep Socket Set

[Snap-on S-T 1/2-Drive Deep Socket Set]

Fig. Snap-on S-T 1/2-Drive Deep Socket Set, with Insets for Top View and Marking Detail, ca. Late s.

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on S-T deep socket set, consisting of eleven S-series deep sockets in a metal holder. The metal holder is stamped with the Snap-on logo on the side, as shown in the middle inset.

The socket models and sizes are, from right to left, S (1/2), S (9/16), S (5/8), S (11/16), S (3/4), S (13/16), S (7/8), S 1/2 (15/16), S 1/2 (1 Inch), S 1/2 (/16), and S 1/2 (/8).

The sockets are all stamped "Made in U.S.A." on the base, and the date codes range from to , except for the S socket from

In this later set the sockets all have the same height, approximately inches.


Snap-on No. 1/2-Drive 3/8 Double-Square Socket

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive 3/8 Double-Square Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive 3/8 Doule-Square Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on 3/8 double-square socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "*" date code for

The finish is cadmium plating.


Snap-on NA 1/2-Drive Ratchet

[Snap-on NA 1/2-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on NA 1/2-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail,

Fig. shows a later 1/2-drive Snap-on NA ratchet, with "Snap-on U.S.A." in raised letters forged into the shank, and with "Patent No " forged into the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is polished chrome.

This ratchet has an interesting variation for its date code, with the stylized digit "9" for appearing as a reversed raised letter. Normally the date codes are stamped into the finished tool, but in this case the code was stamped into the forging die, giving the raised and reversed form on the tool.


Snap-on 1/2-Drive Ratchet

[Snap-on 1/2-Drive Long-Handled Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on 1/2-Drive Long-Handled Ratchet, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on long-handled ratchet, stamped "Made in U.S.A." and "Pat. No. " on the round shank.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is polished chrome.


Snap-on L 1/2-Drive Ratchet

[Snap-on L 1/2-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. B. Snap-on L 1/2-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail,

Fig. B shows a Snap-on L 1/2-drive ratchet, marked with the Snap-on logo on the shank and "USA" on the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is polished chrome.

The reverse is also marked "Pat. No. D", a reference to design patent #D,, issued in to D. Chapman with assignment to Snap-on. The patent covers the design for the grooved and contoured handle.


Snap-on L 1/2-Drive Ratchet

[Snap-on L 1/2-Drive Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on L 1/2-Drive Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side View, ca. Mid s.

Fig. shows a Snap-on L 1/2-drive ratchet with an unusual forged body, marked with "Snap-on" and "Kenosha, WI." forged into the handle, with "Pat. No. " and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is cadmium plating.

The reverse marking cites patent #2,,, filed by G.R. Gagne in and issued in


Snap-on No. 1 1/2-Drive Offset Handle

[Snap-on No. 1 1/2-Drive Offset Handle]

Fig. Snap-on No. 1 1/2-Drive Offset Handle, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on No. 1 offset handle, marked "Made in U.S.A." with a date code for , as shown in the insets.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is polished chrome.

The venerable No. 1 offset handle bar was among the first tools offered by Snap-on in Examples of earlier versions of this tool include the Early Snap-on Offset Handle and Snap-on No. 1 Offset Handle. By the No. 1 handle had evolved to a form very similar to the example shown here.


Snap-on K4 1/2-Drive Speeder

[Snap-on K4 1/2-Drive Speeder]

Fig. Snap-on K4 1/2-Drive Speeder, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a Snap-on K4 1/2-drive speeder, marked with the Snap-on logo and a stylized "5" date code for

The speeder has a throw of inches with an overall length of inches. The finish is chrome plating.

During the s Snap-on offered many different models of speeders and braces, but by the s had standardized on a more limited selection of models. Readers interested in more information may want to refer to the section on Snap-on Early Speeders and Braces. An earlier version of this particular model can be seen as the Snap-on Early K4 Speeder.


Early Snap-on No. 10 1/2-Drive Flex-Head Handle

This next example is believed to be one of the earliest flex-head handles offered by Snap-on.

[Early Snap-on No. 10 1/2-Drive Flex-Head Handle]

Fig. Early Snap-on No. 10 1/2-Drive Flex-Head Handle, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows an early Snap-on No. 10 1/2-drive flex-head handle, stamped with "No. 10 Snap-on" and a "0" date code for The shank is also marked "Patent Applied For" near the flex head (see left inset).

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel, possibly with traces of cadmium plating.

The knurled handle has a 7/16 diameter cross-bar hole, allowing the tool to function as a Tee-handle.

The patent corresponding to the patent applied notice is not yet known, and it's possible that the patent application was denied. The design of this tool has placed the fork on the flex head, rather than at the end of the shank, probably to avoid infringing the Eagle patent #1,, The flex-head appears to be using a wave-washer to control its movement, rather than a friction ball, and this might have been the subject of the patent application.


Snap-on C 1/2-Drive "Nut Spinner" Flex-Head Handle

[Snap-on C 1/2-Drive Flex-Head Handle]

Fig. Snap-on C 1/2-Drive Flex-Head Handle, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on C flex-head handle, marked with the Snap-on logo and "Nut Spinner", and with a stylized "4" date code for on the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The knurled handle has a cross-bar hole and a 1/2-drive broaching in the end, allowing the tool to function as a T-handle or an extension.

Although not marked with a patent notice, this tool was covered by the (pending) patent #2,,, filed by E.F. Pilger in and issued in The patent describes the multi-position detent employed for the flex-head, with a spring clip to provide friction.

Some readers may have wondered about the inverted configuration of this flex handle, with the fork on the head rather than on the handle. There's an interesting story behind this, which begins in the late s when Plomb Tool began offering flex handles based on a patented design (#1,,) using a fork on the handle. (An early Plomb flex handle can be seen as the Plomb DTH Hinge Handle.) Flex handles became popular and other makers (including Snap-on) began offering them, but generally in the alternate forked-head design, to avoid obvious patent infringement.

Some other tool makers did produce flex handles similar to the patented design, and eventually the inventor Samuel Eagle filed a patent infringement lawsuit against P&C, one of the makers using forked handles. But in a court decision, the Eagle patent was ruled invalid based on prior patented claims, and this ruling opened the way for other makers to use the design freely. Readers interested in more information on this patent case can refer to our article on P&C Hand Forged Tool Company.


Snap-on NS 1/2-Drive "Nut Spinner" Flex-Head Handle

[Snap-on NS Flex-Head Handle]

Fig. Snap-on NS Flex-Head Handle, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on NS flex-head handle, marked "Made in U.S.A." with an stylized "E" date code for , and with the "Pat. No's. 2,, 2,, & Pat. Pend." patent notices.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The knurled handle is drilled to accept a 7/16 diameter cross-bar.

The first of the listed patents is #2,,, issued to E.F. Pilger in The second patent is #2,,, issued to G.R. Gagne in


Snap-on NS-4C 1/2-Drive "Nut Spinner" Flex-Head Speeder

[Snap-on NS-4C 1/2-Drive Flex-Head Speeder]

Fig. Snap-on NS-4C 1/2-Drive Flex-Head Speeder, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on NS-4C flex-head speeder, marked "Made in U.S.A." with a stylized "7" date code for , and with the extensive "Pat. No's. 2,, 2,, & Pat. Pend." patent notices.

The speeder has a throw of inches with an overall length of inches. The finish is chrome plating.


Snap-on S Sliding Tee Handle

[Snap-on S 1/2-Drive Sliding Tee Handle]

Fig. Snap-on S 1/2-Drive Sliding Tee Handle, with Inset for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on S sliding Tee handle, marked with a "G" date code for (see inset).

The overall length is inches, and the finish is cadmium plating.

One detail to note here is that the detent ball is secured by a serrated depressed ring, rather than the smooth ring seen on earlier tools. Some readers may have wondered about this, and it turns out to be a patented feature introduced by Snap-on in the late s. The rationale is described in patent #2,,, filed by L.F. Densmore in and issued in


Snap-on SG-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Rotating-Grip Extension

[Snap-on SG-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Rotating-Grip Extension]

Fig. Snap-on SG-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Rotating-Grip Extension, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on SG-6 6 inch extension with a rotating grip, stamped with the Snap-on logo and model number on the shank, with a "0" date code for on the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome (or possibly nickel) plating.


Snap-on SG 1/2-Drive 10 Inch Rotating-Grip Extension

[Snap-on SG 1/2-Drive 10 Inch Rotating-Grip Extension]

Fig. Snap-on SG 1/2-Drive 10 Inch Rotating-Grip Extension, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on SG 10 inch extension with a rotating grip, stamped with the Snap-on logo and model number on the shank, with a "0" date code for on the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


Snap-on S-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Extensions

The next figures show two generations of the Snap-on S-6 extension.

[Snap-on S-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Extension]

Fig. Snap-on S-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Extension, with Inset for Date Code,

Fig. shows an earlier 1/2-drive Snap-on S-6 6 inch extension, marked with the Snap-on logo and a stylized "4" date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

[Snap-on S-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Extension]

Fig. Snap-on S-6 1/2-Drive 6 Inch Extension, with Inset for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a later 1/2-drive Snap-on S-6 6 inch extension, marked "Made in U.S.A." with a date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The detent ball on this extension shows the serrated ring described by patent #2,,


Snap-on No. 8 1/2-Drive Universal

[Snap-on No. 8 1/2-Drive Universal]

Fig. Snap-on No. 8 1/2-Drive Universal, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 1/2-drive Snap-on No. 8 universal, marked with the Snap-on logo and a date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


3/8-Drive Sockets and Tools


Snap-on FU 3/8-Drive Universal Socket

[Snap-on FU 3/8-Drive Universal Socket]

Fig. Snap-on Fu 3/8-Drive Universal Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on FU 11/16 universal socket, stamped "Made in U.S.A." and "Pat. 2,," on the socket walls. The base is stamped with the Snap-on logo and model, plus a stylized "0" date code for

The finish is chrome plating.

The patent listed on the socket is #2,,, issued to E.F. Pilger in The patent describes a mechanism for controlled friction in universal joints.


Snap-on F 3/8-Drive Half-Speeder

[Snap-on F 3/8-Drive Half-Speeder]

Fig. Snap-on F 3/8-Drive Half-Speeder, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on F half-speeder, a tool designed for rapidly spinning nuts with one hand. The shank is stamped with the Snap-on logo and model number, with a "*" date code symbol for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is cadmium plating. (Cadmium plating was Snap-on's standard finish in )


Snap-on FD 3/8-Drive Speeder

[Snap-on FD 3/8-Drive Speeder]

Fig. Snap-on FD 3/8-Drive Speeder, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on FD speeder, stamped "Ferret" with the Snap-on logo and model number, and with a "G" date code symbol for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel, with some pitting due to rust.


Snap-on Ferret FB 3/8-Drive Flex-Head Handle

[Snap-on FB 3/8-Drive Flex-Head Handle]

Fig. Snap-on Ferret FB 3/8-Drive Flex-Head Handle, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on Ferret FB flex-head breaker bar, marked "Made in U.S.A." with a stylized "0" date code for , and with the extensive "Pat. No's. 2,, 2,, & Pat. Pend." patent notices.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The first patent listed on the tool is #2,,, issued to G.R. Gagne in This patent describes a mechanism to provide controlled friction in universal joints, and since the flex head of a breaker bar is similar to one half of a universal joint, the patent applies here as well.

The second patent noted is the Pilger #2,,, describing the use of multiple detents on a flexible head. But this patent marking seems a bit overzealous, as the flex head on this breaker bar doesn't include any detents at all.


Snap-on FC 3/8-Drive Short-Handled Ratchet

[Snap-on FC 3/8-Drive Short-Handled Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on FC 3/8-Drive Short-Handled Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side View,

Fig. shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on FC short-handled ratchet, stamped with the Snap-on logo and model on the shank, with "Pat. D" and "U.S.A." on the reverse. The face also has a stylized "3" date code below the shift lever.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating, with extensive losses due to rust and pitting.

The patent notice refers to design patent #D,, issued to D. Chapman in with assignment to Snap-on.


Snap-on (Industrial) PF 3/8-Drive Open-Style Ratchets

The next two figures show examples of an open-style ratchet believed to have been part of Snap-on's line of industrial tools.

[Snap-on (Industrial) PF Open-Style Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on (Industrial) PF Open-Sytle Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side View,

Fig. shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on PF open-style ratchet, stamped with the Snap-on logo and "Made in U.S.A." on the shank, with the model number on the reverse. The shank is also stamped with a stylized "3" date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel, possibly with traces of cadmium plating.

The PF ratchet was offered over an extended period of time, from the s (or possibly earlier) through the s or later. Currently we are not very familiar with Snap-on's Industrial line due to a lack of catalogs.

[Snap-on (Industrial) PF Open-Style Ratchet]

Fig. Snap-on (Industrial) PF Open-Sytle Ratchet, with Insets for Reverse and Side View,

Fig. shows a later 3/8-drive Snap-on PF open-style ratchet, stamped with the Snap-on logo and "USA" wrapping around the shank, with the model number and a stylized date code for below (see composite inset).

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel, with pitting due to rust.

The PF ratchet was offered over an extended period of time, from the s (or possibly earlier) through the s or later. Currently we are not very familiar with Snap-on's Industrial line due to a lack of catalogs.


Legacy Drive Sizes: 5/8-Drive and 7/8-Drive

During the s Snap-on's 5/8-drive and 7/8-drive tools had played an important role as the company's two largest drive sizes. However, early in the s it became apparent that these drive sizes would no longer be sufficient for the demands of the time, and both sizes were discontinued. The 5/8 and 7/8 drive sizes were superseded by 3/4-drive and 1 inch drive, respectively, and Snap-on also added a /2 inch "Jumbo" drive line for the really difficult jobs.

In this section we'll look at a few examples of the late production of 5/8-drive and 7/8-drive tools.


Snap-on 5/8-Drive No. /4 Hex Socket

[Snap-on 5/8-Drive No. /4 Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 5/8-Drive No. /4 Hex Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 5/8-drive Snap-on No. /4 hex socket, stamped with the model, Snap-on logo, and fractional size on one side, and with both "0" and "*" date codes on the reverse (see upper right inset).

The finish is cadmium plating.


Snap-on 5/8-Drive Dh 31/32 Double-Hex Socket

[Snap-on 5/8-Drive DH 31/32 Double-Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 5/8-Drive DH 31/32 Double-Hex Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 5/8-drive Snap-on DH 31/32 double-hex socket, stamped with the model, Snap-on logo, and size, and with a "0" date code for on the reverse (see lower right inset).

The finish is nickel plating.


Snap-on 5/8-Drive [DH-] /8 Inch Socket

[Snap-on 5/8-Drive DH /8 Double-Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 5/8-Drive [DH-] /8 Double-Hex Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Date Code,

Fig. shows a 5/8-drive Snap-on [DH-] /8 socket with a double-hex broaching, stamped with the model, Snap-on logo, and size, and with a "0" date code for on the reverse (see upper right inset). Note that this example is missing the "DH-" prefix to the model number, though it's obviously a double-hex socket.

The finish is nickel plating.


Snap-on 5/8-Drive [DH] /2 Socket

[Snap-on 5/8-Drive DH /2 Double-Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 5/8-Drive [DH] /2 Double-Hex Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Date Code,

Fig. shows a 5/8-drive Snap-on [DH] /2 socket with a double-hex broaching, marked with the Snap-on logo and size, and with a "0" date code for on the reverse (see upper right inset). This socket is not marked with a model number, but the catalogs identify it as a model DH

The finish is cadmium plating.


Snap-on [HD-5] 5/8-Drive Sliding Tee Handle

[Snap-on HD-5 5/8-Drive Sliding Tee Handle]

Fig. Snap-on [HD-5] 5/8-Drive Slding Tee Handle, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 5/8-drive Snap-on [HD-5] sliding Tee handle, stamped with the Snap-on logo and a date code symbol for Although not marked with a model number, this tool was listed as the HD-5 in the catalogs.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel.

This tool is very similar to the earlier version of the Snap-on HD-5 Slidign Tee Handle shown in a prior article. The date code on this example makes it one of the last tools of its type, as 5/8-drive had become obsolete with the introduction of 3/4-drive in


Snap-on HD-6 5/8-Drive 8 Inch Extension

[Snap-on HD-6 5/8-Drive 8 Inch Extension]

Fig. Snap-on HD-6 5/8-Drive 8 Inch Extension, with Inset for Reverse Detail,

Fig. shows a 5/8-drive Snap-on HD-6 8 inch extension, stamped with the Sna nd -on logo, and with a stylized "5" date code for on the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The production date for this extension is quite late for 5/8-drive tools.


Snap-on 7/8-Drive [XHD] /8 Hex Socket

[Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD /8 Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 7/8-Drive [XHD] /8 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 7/8-drive Snap-on [XHD] /8 hex socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and fractional size, and with a "*" date code symbol for on the reverse (see upper right inset). This example is not marked with a model number, but was listed as a model XHD socket in the catalogs.

The finish is plain steel with traces of cadmium plating.

This socket is very similar to the 7/8-drive sockets produced in the s, as for example the Snap-on XHD Socket.


Snap-on 7/8-Drive [XHD] /4 Hex Socket

[Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD /4 Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 7/8-Drive [XHD] /4 Hex Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Date Code,

Fig. shows a 7/8-drive Snap-on [XHD] /4 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "0" date code for (see upper right inset). Although this example is not marked with a model number, the catalog referred to this as a model XHD socket.

The finish is nickel plating.

This socket is very similar to the 7/8-drive sockets produced in the s, as for example the Snap-on XHD Socket.


Snap-on 7/8-Drive [XHD] /8 Inch Socket

[Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD /8 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 7/8-Drive [XHD] /8 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Date Code,

Fig. shows a 7/8-drive Snap-on [XHD] /8 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "0" date code for (see upper right inset). Although this example is not marked with a model number, the catalog referred to this as a model XHD socket.

The finish is nickel plating.

This socket is very similar to the 7/8-drive sockets produced in the s, as for example the Snap-on XHD Socket.


Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD-6 8 Inch Extension

[Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD-6 Extension]

Fig. Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD-6 Extension, with Inset for Date Code,

Fig. shows a 7/8-drive Snap-on XHD-6 8 inch extension, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "0" date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is nickel plating, with losses due to rust and wear.


Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD 16 Inch Extension

[Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD Extension]

Fig. Snap-on 7/8-Drive XHD Extension, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 7/8-drive Snap-on XHD 16 inch extension, stamped on the shank with the Snap-on logo and a "0" date code for

The overall length is inches. The finish is nickel plating, darkened by rust and with some loss due to wear.


3/4-Drive Sockets and Tools

Snap-on introduced its 3/4-drive tools in the early s as a stronger replacement for the older 5/8-drive line. The first standard Snap-on catalog to list 3/4-drive tools was catalog "I" of , but the 3/4-drive line was actually introduced in a supplement to catalog "H". The supplemental catalog offered 3/4-drive sockets in standard hex, standard double-hex, extra deep hex, and double-square styles, plus a modest selection of drive tools. Snap-on referred to the 3/4-drive tools as the "Heavy Duty" line, as the older 5/8-drive tools had been called.

The initial drive tools consisted of a No. "Nut Spinner" flex-head handle with cross-bar, a No. 52 sliding Tee bar, a No. 72 forged-handle ratchet with a push-through drive plug, a No. 62 8 inch extension, and a No. 16 inch extension. The socket models offered were the hex series models (15/16) through (2 Inch), the double-hex models DH (15/16) through DH (2 Inch), the extra deep hex models S (15/16), S (/16), and S (/4), and the double-square models (7/8) to (/16).

Although the early No. 72 ratchet used the same forged handle design as the HD-7 5/8-drive ratchet, by Snap-on had introduced a new No. Y ratchet head with a removable handle, sharing the handle bar with the No. 52 sliding Tee. This early introduction of the ratchet head and shared handle bar brought a significant innovation to heavy-duty drive tools. Up until this point all Snap-on ratchets had been made with integral forged handles, but for heavy-duty tools this greatly increased the weight and cost of the unit. Snap-on's removable handle bars made significant savings of weight and cost, and allowed them to offer practical sets of heavy-duty tools.

The No. "Nut Spinner" flex-head handle initially included an integral handle with a cross-bar hole, but it later evolved into the L flex-head adapter, sharing the handle bar with the ratchet head and sliding Tee head.


Snap-on Early No. B 3/4-Drive Socket Set

We'll begin this section with a very early No. B socket set from , believed to be one of the first 3/4-drive socket sets manufactured by Snap-on. The No. B set was first announced in in a supplement to the catalog "H", but our example actually dates to late , based on the consistent date codes on the tools.

[Snap-on Early No. B 3/4-Drive Socket Set]

Fig. Snap-on Early No. B 3/4-Drive Socket Set,

Fig. shows a Snap-on No. B 3/4-drive socket set in its metal case, consisting of a No. 52 sliding Tee handle, No. 62 8 inch extension, No. 16 inch extension, and eight hex sockets.

The socket sizes and models are, from the right, 31/32 (No. ), 1 inch (No. ), /16 (No. ), /8 (No. ), /4 (No. ), /8 (No. ), /16 (No. ), and /2 (no model). The sockets are marked with the Snap-on logo, model, and fractional size, and all of the sockets are stamped with a "0" date code for The finish is cadmium plating.

All of the tools and sockets in the set are stamped with a "0" date code for , except for the short (No. 62) extension. The No. 62 extension has a stylized "4" date code for , making it a replacement from a few years later.

[Top Cover of Snap-on Early No. B Socket Set]

Fig. Top Cover of Snap-on Early No. B Socket Set,

Fig. shows the top cover of the Snap-on No. B socket set, illustrating the leather carrying handle and brass identification plate. The plate is marked "Genuine Snap-On Socket Wrenches" with "Mfg. by Snap-on Wrench Company" and "Milwaukee, Wis." near the bottom.

The sturdy metal box has dimensions inches wide by inches deep by inches high. The box has been refinished with orange paint by a former owner, but a few patches of the original black paint can be seen.

The catalog specifications for the B set provide a No. 52 sliding Tee handle, a No. 62 8 inch extension, a No. 16 inch extension, and eight hex sockets with sizes 15/16, 31/32, 1 inch, /16, /8, /4, /8, and /16, all furnished in a sturdy metal case. (The "-B" suffix to the model number indicates a metal box.) Alternatively, the tools and sockets could be ordered without the box as a No. set. Based on the catalog description, our set as acquired was missing the 15/16 (No. ) socket and had an extra /2 socket.

Several similar 3/4-drive sets were offered in the same supplement to catalog "H". The No. 36 set included the same socket sizes but with DH-series double-hex broachings, and with a No. "Nut Spinner" handle replacing the sliding Tee and extensions. The No. [-B] sets were identical to the No. [-B] models, but provided DH-series double-hex sockets. And finally, the Nos. [-B] and [-B] sets added a No. 72 ratchet to the Nos. [-B] and [-B] models, respectively.


Snap-on No. 52 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle

[Snap-on No. 52 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle]

Fig. Snap-on No. 52 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows the Snap-on No. 52 3/4-drive sliding Tee handle from the early B set, stamped with the Snap-on logo and model on the sliding head, with a "0" date code for on the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the diameter of the bar is inches (7/8 nominal). The finish is plain steel.

The drive stud is equipped with two detent balls backed by a very stiff spring.

This sliding Tee handle is probably one of the first 3/4-drive tools produced by Snap-on, as the date code places it before even the catalog supplement that announced the 3/4-drive size. This tool was acquired as part of the Snap-on Early No. B Socket Set dated to


Snap-on No. 3/4-Drive 16 Inch Extension

[Snap-on No. 3/4-Drive 16 Inch Extension]

Fig. Snap-on No. 3/4-Drive 16 Inch Extension, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows the 3/4-drive Snap-on No. 16 inch extension from the early B set, stamped with the Snap-on logo and model number on the shank, with a "0" date code for on the reverse.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is cadmium plating, with losses due to wear.

The drive stud is equipped with two detent balls backed by a very stiff spring.

This extension was acquired as part of the Snap-on Early No. B Socket Set dated to


Snap-on No. 3/4-Drive /8 Hex Socket

[Snap-on No. 3/4-Drive /8 Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on No. 3/4-Drive /8 Hex Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows the 3/4-drive Snap-on No. /8 socket from the Early No. B Socket Set, stamped with the model number and Snap-on logo on the front, with a "0" date code for on the reverse.

The finish is cadmium plating.


Snap-on No. 62 3/4-Drive 8 Inch Extension

[Snap-on No. 62 3/4-Drive 8 Inch Extension]

Fig. Snap-on No. 62 3/4-Drive 8 Inch Extension, with Inset for Date Code,

Fig. shows an early 3/4-drive Snap-on No. 62 8 inch extension, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "*" date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The drive stud is equipped with two detent balls backed by a very stiff spring.

The date code on this extension demonstrates that the 3/4-drive line was available in Previously we believed that this extension was one of the oldest Snap-on 3/4-drive tools; however, since then an entire set of 3/4-drive tools with date codes has been acquired.


Early Snap-on [DH] 3/4-Drive /16 Socket

[Early Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket]

Fig. Early Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, with Inset for Broaching, ca.

Fig. shows an example of an early 3/4-drive socket, a Snap-on [DH] /16 double-hex socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and fractional size. Although no date code marking was found, the socket is likely from or early , based on the plain steel or possibly cadmium finish.

The right inset shows the cold-broached socket construction. Note the machined recess below the broached area and the chatter marks plainly visible on the walls.


Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket

[Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on DH /8 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "Pat. No. " patent notice, and with a date code symbol for (see lower inset).

The right inset shows the cold-broached socket construction. Note the machined recess below the broached area and the chatter marks plainly visible on the walls.


Snap-on DH-xx2 3/4-Drive Sockets

[Snap-on DH-xx2 3/4-Drive Sockets]

Fig. Snap-on DH-xx2 3/4-Drive Sockets, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a composite photograph of two 3/4-drive Snap-on DH-xx2 sockets. Both sockets are marked with the Snap-on logo and a "Pat. No. " patent notice, and have a stylized "4" date code for (see lower inset). The models and sizes are DH (/16) on the left and DH (/4) on the right.

The right inset shows the cold-broached socket construction with a machined recess below the broached area. Some chatter marks are visible on the walls, though less apparent than in the previous figure.


Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket

[Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on DH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on DH /8 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "Pat. No. " patent notice, and with a stylized "4" date code for (see lower inset).

The upper right inset shows the cold-broached socket construction with a machined recess below the broached area.


"LOXOCKET" Locking Sockets and the LDH Series

In Snap-on made a significant change in its line of 3/4-drive tools with the introduction of sockets with release buttons, for use with locking drive studs. Drive studs with locking pins had been introduced previously, but the addition of a push-button release made the tools much more convenient to use.

The system of locking pins and release buttons adopted by Snap-on was based on the "Lock-On" patents developed by Blackhawk Manufacturing. (Readers interested in background information will find extensive coverage in our article on Blackhawk Lock-On Tools.) Snap-on didn't adopt all aspects of Blackhawk's system, but they did license the patent #RE covering the release buttons, and references to this patent will be found marked on sockets up through the late s. In Snap-on coined the trademark "LOXOCKET" for the sockets with release buttons, although the trademark wasn't registered until much later.

The addition of release buttons was also the occasion for other changes to the 3/4-drive socket line. Of the four socket styles initially offered in (hex, double-hex, extra deep hex, and double-square), only two remained in production for later years. The DH-xx2 series of double-hex sockets became the LDH-xx2 Loxocket series, but with straight walls instead of the earlier tapered design, and the S-xx2 series of extra deep sockets became the LS-xx2 Loxocket series. The hex socket series (models to ) was discontinued after , but the double-square sockets apparently saw limited production in in the Loxocket line, but afterwards were discontinued. The double-square Loxockets are not known to have been listed in any Snap-on catalog, but a couple of examples from have been discovered. (See for example the Snap-on L Double-Square Socket.)

The figures below will show the development of the LDH Loxocket series, with numerous small changes to the markings as well as incremental improvements to the construction. The initial design included a band of parallel knurling around the socket, with the model number, Snap-on logo, and socket size stamped below the band. Other markings such as patent and trademark notices were not very standardized though, and these markings will be found in different places.

The standard finish for the LDH series was chrome plating, with the upper walls highly polished and a flat or matte finish to the socket base and knurled band.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /2 Socket

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /2 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /2 Socket, with Insets for Drive End and Broaching,

Fig. shows an early 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /2 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a stylized "5" date code for (see lower inset).

The left inset shows the drive end of the socket. Note the notch cut on the side with the release button, which helps to depress the locking pin when inserting a drive stud.

The socket construction appears to be cold-broached, with a machined recess below the broached area and some chatter marks visible on the walls.

This socket was acquired as part of an L Socket Set dating to early , which is described in a later figure.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Socket

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Socket, with Insets for Drive End and Broaching,

Fig. shows an early 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH 1 inch socket, stamped with the Snap-on logo and a stylized "6" date code for (see lower inset), and with "Loxocket Trademark" on the drive end.

The left inset shows the drive end of the socket. Note the notch cut on the side with the release button, which helps to depress the locking pin when inserting a drive stud.

The right inset shows the socket construction, with a machined recess visible below the broached area.

This socket is currently our earliest example of the "Loxocket" trademark marking, and its production date is two years earlier than the first use date in the trademark filing.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket, with Insets for Drive End and Broaching,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /8 socket, stamped with the Snap-on logo and a stylized "7" date code for (see lower inset), and with "Loxocket Trademark" on the drive end.

The left inset shows the drive end of the socket. Note the notch cut on the side with the release button, which helps to depress the locking pin when inserting a drive stud.

The right inset shows the socket construction with a machined recess below the broached area, as we saw in the previous example. A careful look shows a few burrs at the end of the broached area, though the walls are quite smooth and relatively free of chatter marks.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, with Insets for Drive End and Broaching,

Fig. shows a similar socket made a few years later than the previous example, a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /16 socket, marked with the Snap-on logo and a stylized "9" date code for (see lower inset).

The left inset shows the drive end of the socket, stamped with "Loxocket Trademark", Snap-on's registered trademark for the release button feature. The rounded notch on the side with the release button helps to depress the locking pin when inserting a drive stud.

The right inset shows the socket construction with a machined recess below the broached area, as we saw in the previous examples. In this case though, the broached walls are very smooth and free of chatter marks.


Snap-on LDHA 3/4-Drive /16 Socket

The next several figures show the more extensive markings appearing on later LDH sockets. The markings tended to move around depending on the size of the socket.

[Snap-on LDHA 3/4-Drive /16 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDHA 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDHA /16 socket with markings on the base and below the knurled band. The base is stamped "Made in U.S.A." next to the release button, as seen in the lower left inset. The model number and Snap-on logo are stamped below the knurled band, as seen in the main photograph, followed by the size (not shown) and a "Lic. Reissue Pat. " patent notice, seen in the lower right inset. Finally, the stylized "0" date code for appears to the right of the patent notice.

The upper right inset shows the socket construction with a machined recess below the broached area.

This is our earliest LDH series socket marked for patent #RE, issued in to Blackhawk Manufacturing. The patent covers the use of locking pins and release buttons for sockets. Since Snap-on started offering the release button feature in late , it's not clear why they waited until to acknowledge the patent.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /4 Socket

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /4 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /4 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /4 socket, with extensive markings on the base and below the knurled band. The base is stamped "Trademark Loxocket" and "Made in USA" next to the release button, as can be seen in the upper left corner of the main photograph. Further around the base is a the patent notice "Lic. Reissue Pat. No. ", as shown in the lower left inset.

Finally, the model number, Snap-on logo, and size are stamped below the knurled band, with the stylized "2" date code on the opposite side (see lower right inset).

The upper right inset shows the socket construction with a machined recess below the broached area.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, Wartime Production

The next several figures show sockets marked for Snap-on, but with a different design and made using a hot-forged construction technique. These are believed to be wartime production with socket blanks produced by Wright Tool and Forge.

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /8 Socket, with Inset for Broaching, ca.

Fig. shows an unusual 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /8 socket with a different design, notable for the tapered shoulder and hot-forged construction. The socket is stamped on the side with the Snap-on logo and "Made in USA", plus "Lic. Reissue" and "Pat. No. ". Although not visible in the photograph, the socket is fitted with a standard "Loxocket" release button.

The finish is plain steel, possibly originally with cadmium plating.

The inset shows the interior of the socket to illustrate the hot-forged construction. In the hot-forging process a slug of heated metal is forced into a die, simultaneously forming the double-hex service opening and the square drive opening.

The plain finish and unusual construction of this socket likely indicate production during the wartime years. This socket closely resembles the production by Wright Tool and Forge, suggesting that Wright may have supplied the socket blank to Snap-on.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, Wartime Production

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, with Inset for Broaching, ca.

Fig. shows another example with a tapered shoulder and hot-forged construction, a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /16 socket. The socket is stamped on the side with the Snap-on logo and "Made in USA", plus "Lic. Reissue" and "Pat. No. ".

The finish is cadmium plating.

The inset shows the interior of the socket to illustrate the hot-forged construction. In the hot-forging process a slug of heated metal is forced into a die, simultaneously forming the double-hex service opening and the square drive opening.

The cadmium finish and unusual construction of this socket likely indicate production during the wartime years. This socket closely resembles the production by Wright Tool and Forge, suggesting that Wright may have supplied the socket blank to Snap-on.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /2 Socket, Wartime Production

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /2 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /2 Socket, with Inset for Broaching, ca.

Fig. shows another example of the unusual hot-forged 3/4-drive sockets, a Snap-on LDH /2 socket, stamped on the side with the Snap-on logo and "Made in USA", plus "Lic. Reissue" and "Pat. No. ".

The finish is cadmium plating.

The inset shows the interior of the socket to illustrate the hot-forged construction. In the hot-forging process a slug of heated metal is forced into a die, simultaneously forming the double-hex service opening and the square drive opening.

The cadmium finish and unusual construction of this socket likely indicate production during the wartime years. This socket closely resembles the production by Wright Tool and Forge, suggesting that Wright may have supplied the socket blank to Snap-on.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /4 Socket

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /4 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /4 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /4 socket with extensive markings, all stamped below the knurled band. The markings are, from left to right, the Snap-on logo, the size, the model number, a stylized "7" date code for , "Made in U.S.A.", a "Lic. Reissue Pat. " patent notice, and "Loxocket Trade Mark".

The right inset shows the socket construction with a machined recess below the broached area.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, Hot-Broached Construction

In the late s Snap-on updated its socket production to use a hot-broaching method that created a distinctive ring of displaced metal. Similar production methods had been used by Duro Metal Products, Plomb, and other companies for some years, and likely resulted in both lower costs as well as stronger sockets. The new socket style can be easily recognized by the annular shelf at the bottom of the broached area.

The transition was made in , at least for the 3/4-drive sockets, as examples of both production styles can be found for this year.

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive /16 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH /16 socket, stamped with the model, Snap-on logo, and size below the knurled band, and with a stylized "7" date code for on the reverse (see lower inset). The base is stamped with a "Lic. Reissue Pat. " patent notice, followed by "Loxocket Trademark" with "Made in U.S.A." on the bottom line.

The right inset shows the hot-broached construction with an annular ring of displaced metal. The change in the broaching method can be seen easily by comparison with the Snap-on LDH Socket in the previous figure, also of production.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 31/32 Socket, Hot-Broached Construction

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 31/32 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 31/32 Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows another example of the post hot-broached construction, a 3/4-drive Snap-on LDH 31/32 socket. The socket base is stamped "Lic Reissue Pat " and "Loxocket Trademark", with "Made in U.S.A." at the bottom. The remaining markings are stamped around the circumference below the knurled band, beginning with the LDH model, Snap-on logo, 31/32 size, and the stylized "8" date code for (see upper inset).

The right inset shows the hot-broached construction, with the shelf of displaced metal clearly visible below the broaching.


Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 2 Inch Socket, Hot-Broached Construction

The knurled-band style of LDH sockets remained in production until at least , as the next figure illustrates.

[Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 2 Inch Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LDH 3/4-Drive 2 Inch Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive LDH 2 inch socket, with extensive markings shown in the main photograph and composite lower inset. The markings are, from left to right, the Snap-on logo, the size "2", the LDH model, "USA", a "Lic. Reissue Pat. " patent notice, "Loxocket Trade Mark", and a rounded "I" date code for (The date code appears in the main photograph, to the left of the Snap-on logo.)

The right inset shows the details of the hot-broached construction. An annular ring of displaced metal can be seen clearly below the broached area.


Other 3/4-Drive Loxockets

In addition to the well-known LDH-series sockets, Snap-on also produced 3/4-drive sockets in other (non-impact) configurations. The LS-series were deep sockets with a hex (6-point) broaching, and were offered in sizes up to /8. A number of specialty sockets for applications such as ball joint service were also made.


Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Double-Square Socket

The next two figure show examples of 3/4-drive Loxockets with double-square (8-point) broachings, both produced around the same time () that the LDH series was first introduced.

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 7/8 Double-Square Socket]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 7/8 Double-Square Socket, with Insets for Drive End and Broaching,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive L 7/8 double-square socket, marked with the model number, Snap-on logo, and size, and with a stylized "5" date code for (see lower inset).

The finish is a thin chrome plating, mostly intact but with minor losses due to wear and use.

The left inset shows the drive end with a sloping notch by the release button, intended to help insert the drive stud. This type of square notch is seen only on the very early Loxocket production; later sockets have a rounded indentation.

The right inset shows the double-square broaching. The broached area is undercut with a machined recess, and the walls show chatter marks associated with the cold broaching process.


Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Double-Square Socket

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Double-Square Socket]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Double-Square Socket, with Insets for Drive End and Broaching,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive L 1 inch double-square socket, marked with the model number, Snap-on logo, and size, and with a stylized "5" date code for (see lower inset).

The original finish was a thin chrome plating, but most has been lost to rust or corrosion, leaving a pitted surface texture.

The left inset shows the drive end with a sloping notch by the release button, intended to help insert the drive stud. This type of square notch is seen only on the very early Loxocket production; later sockets have a rounded indentation.

The right inset shows the double-square broaching. The broached area is undercut with a machined recess, and the walls show chatter marks associated with the cold broaching process.


Snap-on LS 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Deep Hex Socket

[Snap-on LS 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Deep Hex Socket]

Fig. Snap-on LS 3/4-Drive 1 Inch Deep Hex Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive LS 1 inch deep hex socket, marked with the model number, Snap-on logo, and size, and with the stylized "rocking I" date code for (see upper inset).

The socket height is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


Snap-on Early L 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle with 7/8 Bar

From the early s onward Snap-on designed its larger drive tools with removable and interchangeable handles. This offered a number of advantages, the foremost being a reduction in the weight and cost. Other benefits included easier storage when disassembled, and the ability to use a longer handle when needed for leverage.

The accessory heads for the handles included a ratchet, a sliding Tee head, and a flex head. We'll see examples of these in the next several figures.

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows an early 3/4-drive Snap-on L sliding Tee handle, consisting of an L sliding Tee head with an unmarked [H] handle bar. The sliding head is stamped with Snap-on logo and model number, with a stylized "6" date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The handle bar is fitted with a spring-loaded locking pin visible at the left end, with a fixed stop ball at the opposite end (not shown). This early handle bar was listed in the catalogs as model H and has a 7/8 nominal diameter ( measured), significantly larger than the 13/16 diameter used for the later LH handles. (This difference in the diameters is significant in that the later LB sliding heads won't fit on an earlier bar, a fact we were not aware of until this tool was acquired.) The early handle bars are also somewhat longer than the LH models, inches instead of the later 20 inch length.

A review of catalogs (with the help of another Snap-on collector) suggests that the LB heads and 13/16 diameter LH handle bars were probably introduced in Based on available date-coded examples, the change to smaller diameter had definitely occurred by If any readers have information to further refine the cross-over date, please send us your observations.

Although not originally acquired with the set, this sliding Tee handle was made in the same year as the L Socket Set described in a later figure.


Snap-on LBH 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle with 13/16 Bar

[Snap-on LBH 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle]

Fig. Snap-on LBH 3/4-Drive Sliding Tee Handle, with Inset for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a somewhat later 3/4-drive Snap-on LBH sliding Tee handle, consisting of an LB sliding Tee head with an LH handle bar. Both pieces are marked "Made in U.S.A" with the Snap-on logo.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating. This handle bar has a 13/16 diameter, the new slightly smaller size introduced in the early s.

The mid s Snap-on catalogs assigned the catalog number "LBH" to the combined LB head and LH bar to distinguish them from the earlier L combinations with the larger diameter bar.

The inset shows the stylized "6" date code on the LB head, indicating manufacture in The LH bar has a "7" date code (not shown) for

The handle bar is fitted with a spring-loaded locking pin at one end, seen at the far right in the photograph. The opposite end has a fixed stop ball.

This sliding Tee handle is one of the tools assigned to the s L Socket Set described below.


Snap-on LN 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head with 7/8 Handle Bar

[Snap-on LN 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head with 7/8 Handle Bar]

Fig. Snap-on LN 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head with 7/8 Handle Bar, with Inset for Side View,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LN ratchet head mounted on its unmarked [H] 7/8 diameter handle bar, together forming the L ratchet assembly. The ratchet head in this photograph is from and is shown in greater detail in the next figure.

The overall length is inches. Both pieces are finished with chrome plating, but with extensive losses (especially on the handle) due to rust and pitting.

Although these pieces were not acquired with the set, this is the correct ratchet model for the L Socket Set described in a later figure.


Snap-on LN 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head

The next several figures show successive versions of the Lx series of ratchet heads, first introduced as the LN in

[Snap-on LN 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head]

Fig. Snap-on LN 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LN ratchet head, marked with the Snap-on logo and a "Pat. No. " patent notice (see middle inset). The ratchet is also stamped with a stylized "9" date code for , seen between the "On" and "Off" markings under the shift lever (see lower inset).

The overall length is inches. The finish is chrome plating with polished faces, but with some loss due to rust.

The patent notice refers to the Hummel patent #1,,, discussed previously in the section on 1/2-drive ratchets.

The ratchet head is designed to slip onto a H 7/8 diameter handle bar fitted with a locking pin, and the hole for the pin can be seen on the top of the hollow shank. The same handle bar could also be used with the L sliding Tee head.

Although not acquired with the set, this ratchet is the correct model for the L Socket Set described below.


Snap-on LR 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head

[Snap-on LR 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head]

Fig. Snap-on LR 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head, with Inset for Side View,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LR ratchet head, marked "Made in U.S.A" and "Pat. No. " with the Snap-on logo.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

A stylized "6" date code for can be seen on the top face, between the "On" and "Off" markings under the shift lever.

The patent notice refers to the Hummel patent #1,, mentioned previously.

The ratchet head is designed to slip onto a model LH 13/16 diamter handle bar, and the hole for the locking pin can be seen on the top of the hollow shank. The LR ratchet was the second version of this basic model and was introduced in ; the earlier LN model had been in production since

This ratchet is one of the tools assigned to the s L Socket Set described below.


Snap-on LS 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head

[Snap-on LS 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head]

Fig. Snap-on LS 3/4-Drive Ratchet Head, with Inset for Side View,

Fig. shows the similar later version Snap-on model LS ratchet head, marked "Made in U.S.A" with a stylized "I" date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The LS model appears to be very similar to the previous LR version, and at this point we're not sure what design differences warranted the change in the model suffix.

As a side note, this particular ratchet was recently rebuilt by a Snap-on dealer to correct a problem with a sheared (or just worn out) locking pin. Snap-on continues to provide superb support for its tools, and parts were still readily available for this ratchet even after more than 50 years.

This ratchet is one of the tools assigned to the s HD-B Socket Set to be shown in a later figure.


Snap-on LC 3/4-Drive Flex Handle Heads

Snap-on's earliest 3/4-drive flex-head (or "Nut Spinner") handle were made with an integral shank, rather than the removable handle used for the ratchet and sliding Tee. These early breakers closely resembled the 5/8-drive HD flex handle, and were notable in placing the fork for the flex head on the drive stud piece, rather than on the shank end. The handle end of the shank was also drilled for a cross-bar, for use as a T-handle.

By a removable flex-head was available for use with the standard H handle bar. The first model was the L "Nut Spinner" head, and versions were given letter suffixes "C", "D", and "E" as minor improvements were made to the design.

The next two figures show examples of model L breaker bar heads.

[Snap-on LC 3/4-Drive Flex Handle Head]

Fig. Snap-on LC 3/4-Drive Flex Handle Head, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on LC flex head, designed to work with the LH 13/16 diameter handle bar. The body is stamped "Made in U.S.A" with the Snap-on logo, and with a stylized "7" date code for

The overall length is inches, and the finish is polished chrome.

The upper composite inset shows the markings around the circumference.

This flex head is one of the tools assigned to the s L Socket Set described below.

[Snap-on LC 3/4-Drive Flex Handle Head]

Fig. Snap-on LC 3/4-Drive Flex Handle Head.

Fig. shows a similar Snap-on LC flex handle head, designed to work with the LH 13/16 diameter handle bar. The body is stamped "Made in U.S.A" but without a date code.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is polished chrome.


Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 3 Inch Extension

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 3 Inch Extension ]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 3 Inch Extension, with Insets for End View and Marking Detail,

Fig. shows an early 3/4-drive Snap-on L 3 inch extension, stamped with the Snap-on logo and model on the base, and with "Trademark Loxocket" stamped on the drive end. The reverse side is stamped with a stylized "7" date code for (see upper inset).

The overall length is inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

Note that the drive end (see right inset) has a sloping notch by the release button, intended to help depress the locking pin on the drive stud. This type of square notch is seen only on the very early Loxocket production; later sockets and extensions have a rounded indentation.


Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 8 Inch Extension

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 8 Inch Extension ]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive 8 Inch Extension, with Insets for Marking Detail,

Fig. at the left shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on L 8 inch extension, marked with the Snap-on logo and "Made in U.S.A.", plus "Trademark Loxocket" and a "Lic. Reissue Pat. " patent notice. The lower inset shows the date code marked as "G" (for "Government"), the code used for production in

The overall length is inches, and the finish is cadmium plating.

This extension is one of the tools assigned to the s L Socket Set described below.


Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Flex Handle

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Flex Handle]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Flex Handle, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail.

Fig. shows a 3/4-drive Snap-on L flex-head breaker bar, marked with just the Snap-on logo and model.

The overall length is inches, and the finish is cadmium plating.

The L breaker bar is not listed in any known catalog, suggesting that it may have been a military or industrial special-order item.


LDH-Series 3/4-Drive Socket Sets

Snap-on combined its LDH-series 3/4-drive sockets and tools into sets of various configurations, and these sets provide a convenient snapshot of the development of the 3/4-drive tool line. We currently have four examples of these socket sets, in varying degrees of completeness, and plan to display them soon.

The sets are based on toolbox models from various periods, in particular the model B from , a model B from the early s, a model KR probably from the s, and a more recent model KRAA.


L 3/4-Drive Socket Set

Our earliest example is a L socket set in a model B metal case, dated to early based on the date codes of the sockets. This early set offered a relatively large collection of sockets literally crammed into a smallish box: the catalog illustration shows that the five smallest sockets had to be fitted inside the larger sockets! The L was the largest of the three 3/4-drive sets offered at that time, with the intermediate set listed as model L and the smallest as model L All three sets used the B metal case, with the measurements given as 24L by /8W by /8D.

The catalog description lists the L set with 18 LDH-series sockets, with sizes ranging from 15/16 up to 2 inches. The drive tools consisted of an LN ratchet, H handle, LA sliding Tee head, L flex head, and extensions L, L, and L

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Socket Set]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Socket Set,

Fig. shows the Snap-on L socket set in the B case, with the sockets and tools arranged as in the catalog illustration. (Missing tools and sockets have been filled in from later sets for the photograph.)

[Top View of Snap-on L Socket Set in B Case]

Fig. Top View of Snap-on L Socket Set in B Case,

The top of the B case is shown in Fig. , with the embossed Snap-on logo visible below the leather handle.

The inside of the case measures by by inches, and the outer measurements are by by inches. The finish is gray paint, the standard color for Snap-on boxes from the early s through


s L 3/4-Drive Socket Set

By Snap-on had moved the L set into a more spacious B box, with the list of contents basically the same as the earlier versions. The L set in this configuration continued to be offered through

Our example for this period was built up from separately acquired tools, beginning with the B metal case and adding tools and sockets with (mostly) s date codes. The set specification includes 18 LDH-series sockets from 15/16 up to 2 inches, an LR ratchet, LH handle, LB sliding Tee head, LC flex head, and L, L, and L extensions.

[Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Socket Set]

Fig. Snap-on L 3/4-Drive Socket Set, ca. s.

Fig. shows a Snap-on L socket set in its B case, again with the sockets and tools arranged to approximate the catalog illustration. The B case has two metal dividers to create tapered compartments for the sockets, with a central bay for the drive tools.

The set as shown lacks only the L extension to be complete to the specification. The drive tools are all of mid s manufacture, and the socket manufacturing dates range from the mid s up to , with most from the s.

[Top View of Snap-on L Socket Set in B Case]

Fig. Top View of Snap-on L Socket Set in B Case, ca. s.

The top of the B case is shown in Fig. at the left, with the embossed Snap-on logo visible below the leather handle.

The inside of the case measures by by inches, and the outside measures by by inches. The finish is gray paint, the standard color for Snap-on boxes from the early s through


s HD-B 3/4-Drive Socket Set

In Snap-on updated its socket sets to offer four models of 3/4-drive socket sets, with varying numbers of sockets and drive tools to fit different applications and budgets. The metal cases were updated as well, with the gray metal B case being replaced by the red enamel KR case, and a new larger KR case was introduced as well. (The "KR" prefix used for toolboxes supposedly stands for "Kenosha Red".)

The four socket sets (from smallest to largest) were the model HD-B (10 tools), HD-B (15 tools), HD-B (24 tools), and HD-B (32 tools). The two smaller sets came with the KR metal box, with the larger two using the KR toolbox.

Our example for this period is configured as the HD-B set in a KR box. The set includes 10 LDH-series sockets ranging from /16 up to /8 inches, with the drive tools consisting of the LS ratchet with an LH handle, an LB sliding Tee head, and extensions L and L

Fig. Snap-on HD-B Socket Set in KR Case To Be Added.


s (and Later) HD-B 3/4-Drive Heavy Duty General Set

The model HD-B set was Snap-on's largest collection of 3/4-drive tools for many years. The set is contained in the KRA (later KRAA) metal case and includes 24 LDH-series sockets from 3/4 up to /8 inches. The drive tools consist of the LS ratchet with LH handle, LB sliding Tee head, LD flex head, L universal, LA ratchet adapter, and extensions L, L and L

The KRAA case measures inches long by inches wide, with a height of inches. The box is fitted with a rugged swing-out handle on each end.

Fig. Snap-on HD-B Socket Set in KRAA Case To Be Added.


1 Inch Drive Sockets and Tools


Snap-on 1 Inch Drive LDH /16 Socket

[Snap-on 1 Inch Drive LDH /16 Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1 Inch Drive LDH /16 Socket, with Insets for Drive End and Broaching.

Fig. shows a 1 inch drive Snap-on LDH /16 socket, stamped on the bottom with the Snap-on logo, size, and model number.

The finish is polished chrome plating.


Impact Sockets and Tools


Snap-on 1 Inch Drive IP /8 Double-Square Impact Socket

[Snap-on 1 Inch Drive IP /8 Double-Square Impact Socket]

Fig. Snap-on 1 Inch Drive IP /8 Double-Square Impact Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail.

A relatively early example of a Snap-on impact socket is shown in Fig. , a 1 inch drive Snap-on IP /8 double-square impact socket, marked "Made in USA" with the Snap-on logo.

The finish is plain steel.


Snap-on /2 Inch Drive SIP /8 Impact Socket

This next figure shows one of Snap-on's larger impact sockets, a /2 inch drive "Jumbo" hex socket. The photograph has been arranged as a triptych to show the end markings and broaching details.

[Snap-on /2 Inch Drive SIP /8 Impact Socket]

Fig. Snap-on /2 Inch Drive SIP /8 Impact Socket, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail.

Fig. shows a /2 inch drive Snap-on SIP /8 impact socket, marked on the drive end with the Snap-on logo, size, and model.

The finish is black paint, probably added by a former owner.

This massive socket has a height of inches and a diameter at the opening of inches.


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Set snap on ratchet

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All You Need to Know About Snap-on Ratchets - Snap-on Tools

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