Nasa videos public domain

Nasa videos public domain DEFAULT

Commons:Free media resources/Video

From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository

< Commons:Free media resources

Jump to navigationJump to search

Return to Main page

Other languages:

  • RoyaltyFree — Videos for content creators - Free stock footage for personal and commercial use.
  • Pixabay Videos - HD videos and footage released under the Pixabay license, see {{Pixabay}} for restrictions
  • Archive.org open-source movies - Movies under several licenses. Some licenses are accepted in the commons.
  • Archive.org movies - Presentation of several collections of videos, some with free licenses.
  • Prelinger Archives - over 2, public domain videos of "historic significance"
  • Flickr Creative Commons videos - all assortments of videos.
  • European Southern Observatory videos - space and astronomy videos licensed under Creative Commons Attribution[1]
  • Open Images project, an initiative from the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision. Many of the videos contain Dutch audio., so it's advised to remove the audio when uploading to Wikipedias other than the Dutch Wikipedia.
  • NASA videos
  • White House (Youtube channel)
  • Kremlin.ru (Official Website of President of the Russian Federation) - All materials (fotos, texts, videos, audios, etc.) licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Unported (CC-BY Unported), see template on Wikimedia Commons and letter of authorisation from the Press Secretary allowing use of Kremlin.ru materials.
  • Beachfront B-Roll - Constantly updated personal blog offering, for free, royalty free HD stock video, High Definition and HDR time lapse clips and HD animated looping backgrounds for any personal, corporate and commercial use. Downloads are a simple "Right Click Save" and the files are hosted by Archive.org.
  • Free Stock Footage Archive Free glitch footage licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Unported (CC-BY Unported)
  • Videvo Stock Footage Royalty-Free Stock Video Footage CC licensed (BY) or licensed by the company for easy use in non-commercial and commercial projects.
  • CuteStockFootage.com Free Videos - over 3, various video materials (video transitions, light leaks, particles, green screen videos, video backgrounds, etc.) - licensed under Attribution International (CC BY )
  • Mazwai Stock Video Creative Commons Stock Video Footage CC licensed (BY) Free to use, for commercial and non-commercial works, but you must credit the author of the clip.
  • Free Stock Video Free Stock Video Footage 4k & FULLHD Free to use, for commercial and non-commercial works.

See also: Commons:Video

Sours: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Free_media_resources/Video

GUIDELINES & RULES

 

+ ELIGIBILITY

The Screenings and Competition (hereafter “Competition”) is offered and open only to natural persons who are at least 18 years of age at the time of entry. Parents and guardians of filmmakers younger than 18 can submit on their behalf.

The following persons are not eligible to win prizes:

  • employees of NASA, Houston Cinema Arts Society (hereafter “HCAS”) and their Board,
  • employees of vendors to NASA or HCAS that have contracted to provide services to or in connection with the Competition,
  • members of the Selection Committee, the Competition judges, and members of the households of the foregoing persons (collectively, the “Competition Parties”).

However, if they would like to submit videos for viewing and possible inclusion as finalists, individuals affiliated with NASA should contact Dan Jacobs at [email protected], and individuals affiliated with HCAS should contact Michael Robinson at [email protected] for more information or to discuss the details. NASA contractors may submit under certain circumstances.

By entering, you agree to these Rules and warrant that you are eligible to enter the Competition.

THIS COMPETITION IS VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

--

+ PRE-COMPETITION & KEY DATES

At any time the General Public may visit the NASA IMAGE ARCHIVE and download imagery for public use. There is also a full list of archival sites on this website here: NASA Archives. Access to this Archive is always available year-round, with the exception of any technical or maintenance related shutdowns. Note that the Archives are constantly updated and refreshed with new material.

The general use of these images is governed by NASA and US Federal Regulations and these regulations supersede any CineSpace Guidelines or Terms. The CineSpace Guidelines, Terms, and FAQ endeavor to indicate important NASA regulations for the use of imagery in connection with this Competition.

You must submit an audiovisual work (a “Submission”) that complies with the requirements of these Guidelines and Terms no later than July 14, , using the means described below. Entries will be judged between September (the “Judging Period”). Finalists will be notified on or before October 31, Award Winners will be announced during the Houston Cinema and Arts Festival at the CineSpace premiere and award ceremony.

--

+ HOW TO ENTER

There is no entry fee to submit to CineSpace. You may submit more than one original work. Submissions MUST contain at least 10% (based on total running time) of NASA video imagery. More than 10% can be used and still photos can also be used in addition to the video imagery. This imagery may be obtained through the NASA IMAGE ARCHIVE or other publicly available means such as YouTube, etc. For access to NASA still images please go to the JSC Digital Image Collection or the NASA Flickr page. Please see a full list of archival sites on this website here: NASA Archives.

Detailed submission instructions will be posted when the Call For Works is opened in If your Submission is selected as a Finalist (as defined below), you must provide a high-resolution version upon CineSpace’s request. Once you have submitted a work, it will not be returned. Submissions may be disqualified at any time for non-compliance with these Official Rules. CineSpace makes the final determination as to which Submissions are eligible to take part in this Competition. NASA is the sole judge of the prizewinners. CineSpace will not notify you of any disqualification or the reasons for such disqualification.

ANY ATTEMPT TO ENTER THE COMPETITION EXCEPT AS PROVIDED ABOVE IS VOID.

--

Each Submission must comply with the following rules:

  • It must be an original work by you (apart from the NASA imagery), meaning that you (or the minor you as a parent are submitting for) were one of the work’s principal creators and have the right to submit it to the Submissions Portal and grant the licenses set forth in Terms below.
  • It must have been created after January 1,
  • It must either be in the English language or have English subtitles (to the extent it contains dialogue or text). Songs in a foreign language should also have subtitles, especially when the lyrics are germane to the plot or message.
  • It must be no longer than 10 minutes, including credits.
  • It must contain at least 10% (total runtime of actual work – not including end credits) of NASA Video Imagery, which may be found in the NASA Archives or other publicly available sources. (NASA Imagery may be altered with After Effects or other techniques).
  • The submitted works may be uploaded to the Tongal website in HD p 16×9 with acceptable file formats: .mov, .avi, .mp4, .wmv, and acceptable codecs: H, H (MP4), MPEG-4, H, MPGV, WMV, DivX. Different original formats should be presented in a p sequence – formatted to your preference.
  • Cinespace screens all selections in p format. Should you win, you will also be required to provide a p .mov master file, using a ProRes, Animation, or Uncompressed Codec. Works created in other formats will be converted to p and presented either letterboxed (wider formats) or pillarboxed (old footage and others). To retain your own quality control we advise that you submit any alternative format footage in a p sequence formatted as you wish.
  • If your film was created using a cell phone, please be advised that portrait cell phone footage is difficult to present on screen. It is highly recommended to shoot any video using a cell phone in the landscape or horizontal orientation unless the portrait effect is desired.
  • It must not be an excerpt from a longer work.
  • It must comply with all of the content restrictions set forth in Terms. Among other things, ANY USE OF THIRD PARTY MUSIC IN THE SUBMISSION MUST BE PRE-CLEARED WITH THE APPLICABLE OWNERS/LICENSORS.
  • You must have the right to grant the licenses set forth in Terms.

In general we are looking for Submissions that:

  • Are based on innovative artistic presentation and storytelling
  • Provoke an emotional response
  • Show a mastery of filmmaking craftsmanship

CineSpace is open to all genres and styles including, but not limited to, experimental, narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, ambient, music videos, re-mix, sports, horror, and underground.

IMPORTANT – Please review past Finalists and Winners – while it will not disqualify you, WE STRONGLY URGE YOU TO USE NASA ARCHIVE FOOTAGE THAT HAS NOT BEEN USED IN PAST COMPETITIONS

When submitting to the Submissions Portal you must select the best-fitting genre. CineSpace reserves the right to change the genre.

--

+ SELECTION OF FINALISTS

A team of specialists from NASA and HCAS will select Finalists based on considerations set forth below. All Finalists will be “CineSpace Finalists” and their works will screen at Houston Cinema Arts Festival November The Finalists’ works will also be posted on the HCAS website and various NASA websites. Subsequent screenings may take place at special events throughout the remaining year and a compilation of the finalists may be submitted for screening in its entirety to other collaborating film festivals internationally. All Finalists will be notified of website posts and all screenings.

--

+ CONTENT RESTRICTIONS

Your Submission must comply with the content restrictions and guidelines in the Terms and any NASA Imagery Archive restrictions. This summary of key points of Restrictions and Limitations on Use of NASA Material is provided for convenience. The full restrictions are available here:**

  • You shall not state or imply the endorsement by NASA or by any NASA employee of a commercial product, service, or activity, or use NASA imagery in any manner that might mislead.
  • You are informed that it is unlawful to falsely claim copyright or other rights in NASA material and therefore, you may not claim copyright or other rights in any NASA Material used in any of your Videos.
  • You agree that NASA shall in no way be liable for any costs, expenses, claims, or demands arising out of your use of NASA Material.
  • NASA does not indemnify nor hold harmless users of NASA Material, nor release such users from copyright infringement, nor grant exclusive use rights with respect to NASA Material.
  • NASA Material is not protected by copyright unless noted. If copyrighted, permission should be obtained from the copyright owner prior to use. If not copyrighted, NASA Material may be reproduced and distributed without further permission from NASA.
  • If a recognizable person, or talent (e.g., an astronaut or a noted personality engaged to narrate a film) appears in NASA material, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. Therefore, permission should be obtained from the recognizable person or talent, if the proposed use of the NASA Material could be viewed as a commercial exploitation of that person. However, if the intended use of NASA Material is primarily for communicative purposes, i.e., books, newspapers, and magazines reporting facts of historical significance (constitutionally protected media uses), then such uses will generally be considered not to infringe such personal rights.
  • Some NASA audiovisual material may incorporate music or footage, which is copyrighted and licensed for the particular NASA work. Any editing or otherwise altering of the work may not be covered under the original license, and therefore would require permission of the copyright owner.
  • NASA audiovisual material may include visible NASA identifiers (e.g., the name of the vehicle and the NASA Insignia or Logotype in photographs or film footage of Space Shuttle vehicles). Use of such materials is generally non-objectionable, provided the NASA identifiers appear in their factual context.

In addition, and without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Submission must also comply with the restrictions below:

  • The Submission may not contain obscene or pornographic material; contain threats to any entity, place, group, or world peace; or violate any applicable laws.
  • The Submission may not infringe any third party’s intellectual property rights or infringe any third party’s privacy rights.
  • The Submission must not contain any third party work, INCLUDING ANY MUSICAL RECORDING OR COMPOSITION, unless (1) you have a license to use such work in the Submission from the owners/licensors; (2) such work is in the public domain; (3) your use of such work is clearly “fair use” under United States copyright law.
  • Where required by law, you must have obtained appropriate releases for every person who appears recognizably in your Submission.
  • No live animals may be used in the creation of a Submission unless you have obtained the consent of the animal’s owner and an affidavit from the animal owner or wrangler stating that the animal was not harmed in the making of the Submission.
  • You must not breach any contractual obligation in submitting your Submission.
  • You must provide any licenses, permissions, or releases to CineSpace upon request. Failure to provide such documentation or comply with any the foregoing requirements (in CineSpace’s sole determination) may result in the disqualification of your Submission.
  • By entering your Submission, you represent and warrant that it complies with the requirements set forth in this Section 5.

--

Sours: https://www.cinespace.org/guidelines-rules
  1. Crusade channel mike church
  2. Peterbilt 379 blower motor resistor location
  3. React bootstrap styles
  4. Sharp aquos dvd player
  5. Vintage postage rubber stamps

NASA Image Use Policy

Wednesday, May 13,

Permissions for using imagery found on this website are the same as those listed in NASA's official Media Usage Guidelines

For questions about permission for using NASA images and videos, please refer to NASA's official Media Usage Guidelines. For any additional questions please contact [email protected]

A few key points of NASA's media usage policy include:

  • NASA content (images, videos, audio, etc) are generally not copyrighted and may be used for educational or informational purposes without needing explicit permissions.
  • The NASA insignia logo (the blue "meatball" insignia), the retired NASA logotype (the red "worm" logo) and the NASA seal may not be used for any purpose without explicit permission.
  • If a NASA image includes an identifiable person, using the image for commercial purposes may infringe that person's right of privacy or publicity, and permission should be obtained from the person.
  • If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services.
  • NASA should be acknowledged as the source of the material.
  • NASA occasionally uses copyright-protected material of third parties with permission on its website. Those images will be marked identified as copyright protected with the name of the copyright holder. NASA's use does not convey any rights to others to use the same material. Those wishing to use copyright protected material of third parties must contact the copyright holder directly.
  • Please refer to NASA's official Media Usage Guidelines for more information, and direct any questions to [email protected]
Sours: https://gpm.nasa.gov/image-use-policy

How YouTube lets content companies &#;claim&#; NASA Mars videos

Lon Seidman, as seen in his video
with 90 posters participating

Lon Seidman knew he wasn't going to get rich from his three-hour video discussion of the Curiosity rover landing on Mars. The local media entrepreneur did a live Google+ Hangout about the event and posted the resulting video to YouTube, expecting it would earn him a few bucks and attract some new readers to his site, CT Tech Junkie. During the discussion, Seidman played a number of NASA videos about the Curiosity mission. He knew he was on safe ground because works of the federal government are automatically in the public domain.

So he was surprised to find that no fewer than five other media organizations (mostly television stations, including some from overseas) had "claimed" the content of his video through YouTube's Content ID system. It appears that the other media organizations had uploaded their own news broadcasts—which contained the same public domain material—to Content ID's matching system. The fact that Seidman's video used the same content was enough to trigger a content match.

Five different media organizations "claimed" Seidman's video.

Once a third party has "claimed" a video, the rightsholder has a number of options. It can order the video taken down altogether, as occurred with one of NASA's own videos earlier this week. But more often, the rightsholder will simply begin running ads against the content and pocketing the free cash.

"This is a problem I've had in the past," Seidman told us in a Wednesday interview. For example, he said, he sometimes includes licensed stock music in his videos. "Even though I paid for it and had a right to use it, someone else who licensed the music was claiming ownership over it," he said.

Advertisement

Seidman said that Content ID's dispute-resolution process leaves a lot to be desired. If Seidman disputes another media organization's claim, the other organization has up to a month to respond. "That's a long time for a news agency," he told us. In the meantime, the original owner of the video is blocked from earning any revenue.

"In two instances in the past, the 'rights holder' released the claim on the video, and then YouTube still denied me revenue share for no reason," Seidman told us. In another case, a rightsholder "released claims, and then they re-claimed it. And then you can't do anything."

"My biggest concern is that for every guy like me who will contest this stuff, there are many more people who don't," Seidman told us. "If it goes unanswered, the revenue flows away from the content creator to a corporate entity."

"Not fair to the little guys"

The Content ID system was created because major content owners insisted that the notice-and-takedown regime established by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) didn't go far enough in protecting their rights. YouTube chose to go beyond the letter of the law, creating a system that was supposed to automatically detect infringing videos and either block them or let the rightful owner claim the revenue.

But in accommodating the demands of large copyright holders, YouTube has inadvertently reminded us all of the crucial point that flagging copyright infringement isn't nearly as simple as it is often portrayed by rightsholders. Even scanning videos for exact content matches that exceed certain thresholds (in order to preserve at least some fair uses) actually fails in all sorts of interesting ways.

Rather than acting as a neutral arbitrator between major content companies and independent organizations, YouTube's system favors the larger rightsholders that make use of its Content ID system over smaller creators. And because it's a private system that goes beyond the DMCA, the Content ID system is under no legal obligation to comply with the DMCA's safeguards and timelines.

While the stakes aren't high in this particular case—Seidman estimates he would have earned $3 in advertising revenue from his video—the principle matters to him.

"Working in this independent content space, we have such an opportunity to level the playing field," he said. The current system is "not fair to the little guys."

Sours: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy//08/how-youtube-lets-content-companies-claim-nasa-mars-videos/

Public nasa domain videos

Finding Public Domain & Creative Commons Media

Public Domain LogoWhen you are adding images, videos and other content that you did not create to your presentation, it is important to make sure that you are not violating anyone's copyright. One way to do so is to find public domain images for your presentations. Copyright.gov explains the public domain as follows: "A work of authorship is in the “public domain” if it is no longer under copyright protection or if it failed to meet the requirements for copyright protection. Works in the public domain may be used freely without the permission of the former copyright owner." Because such works can be used without first seeking permission, they are ideal for many projects, particularly those that will extend beyond educational uses.

Note: Even if a work that you use is in the public domain, it is advisable to provide attribution for the work or, at a minimum, keep a record of the attribution of the work, so that you or other interested parties can find it later if necessary.

Creative Commons Logo

If you can't find Public Domain media that fit your needs, you can also use Creative Commons-licensed content as long as you ensure that you correctly attribute this content to its creator and otherwise meet the terms of the license under which the image is offered. You can find more information about this on the Creative Commons FAQ.

Note: Even if content is covered by a Creative Commons license, you must always make sure that your use does not violate that license and that you properly attribute the content.

This video from CreativeCommons.org offers an overview of Creative Commons.

Sours: https://guides.library.harvard.edu/c.php?g=&p=
NASA Video: 50 Years of Mars Exploration - Film
1. ELIGIBILITY

The Screenings and Competition (hereafter “Competition”) is offered and open only to natural persons who are at least 18 years of age at the time of entry. Parents and guardians of film makers younger than 18 can submit on their behalf.

The following persons are not eligible to win prizes: employees of NASA, Houston Cinema Arts Society (hereafter “HCAS”) and their Board, employees of vendors to NASA or HCAS that have contracted to provide services to or in connection with the Competition, members of the Selection Committee, the Competition judges, and members of the households of the foregoing persons (collectively, the “Competition Parties”). However, if they would like to submit videos for viewing and possible inclusion as finalists, individuals affiliated with NASA should contact Dan Jacobs at [email protected] and individuals affiliated with HCAS should contact Patrick Kwiatkowski at [email protected] for more information or to discuss the details. NASA contractors may submit under certain circumstances.

By entering, you agree to these Rules and warrant that you are eligible to enter the Competition.

THIS COMPETITION IS VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

2. PRE-COMPETITION AND KEY DATES

At any time the General Public may visit the NASA IMAGE ARCHIVE and download imagery for public use. Access to this Archive is always available year-round, with the exception of any technical or maintenance related shutdowns. Note that the Archives are constantly updated and refreshed with new material.

The general use of these images is governed by NASA and US Federal Regulations and these regulations supersede any CineSpace Guidelines or Terms. The CineSpace Guidelines, Terms, and FAQ endeavor to indicate important NASA regulations for the use of imagery in connection with this Competition.

You must submit an audiovisual work (a “Submission”) that complies with the requirements of these Guidelines and Terms between March 19,  and July 31, at p.m. (the “Submission Period”) using the means described below. Entries will be judged between August 1, and September 15, (the “Judging Period”). Award winners and Finalist will be notified on or before October 31, The date of a public announcement of Award Winners and Finalist is to be determined at this time.

3. HOW TO ENTER

There is no entry fee to submit to CineSpace. You may submit more than one original work.

Submissions MUST contain at least 10% (based on total running time) of NASA video imagery. More than 10% can be used and still photos can also be used in addition to the video imagery. This imagery may be obtained through the NASA IMAGE ARCHIVE or other publicly available means such as YouTube, etc. For access to NASA still images please go to the JSC Digital Image Collection or the NASA Flickr page.

The Tongal (“Submission Portal”)  Video Submission Phase is open from March 19, – August 1st, p.m PST.

To enter the Competition, you must:

  1. Navigate to Tongal.com/NASACineSpace to access the Challenge Brief, Instructions, and the Submission Form. (You will need to log-in to, or create a Tongal Account to enter your submission)
  2. Upload your video to Tongal through the "Submit" tab of the project page. This will allow judges to view and download the submitted videos. Initial review copies of your works may be uploaded to the Tongal website at HD p  16X9 with acceptable file formats: .mov, .avi, .mp4, .wmv,  and acceptable codecs: H (MP4), MPEG-4, H, MPGV, WMV, DivX. However, Cinespace screens all selections at the highest resolution, p format. Should you win, you will also be required to provide a p .mov master file, using a ProRes, Animation, or Uncompressed Codec. If your film is in any aspect ratio other than 16X9, you are responsible for adding in appropriate pillar boxes or letter boxes, so that the final file comes in at X without distorting your creative intent.  In addition, any non-English language works will be required to submit a version without subtitles and provide either an English subtitle transcript or SRT file with English subtitles – based on p file.
  3. Fill out the required information on the Submission Form, and
  4. Agree to Terms in the Submitter’s Agreement.

CineSpace may use third parties such as Film Freeway for marketing and visibility but all Submissions must come through Tongal.

If you have any issues accessing our submission page or with the submission process please contact [email protected]

The video file that you submit must comply with Tongal’s recommended compression and uploading guidelines (see item 2 above for uploading instructions).

If your Submission is selected as a Finalist (as defined below), you must provide a high-resolution version upon CineSpace’s request.

Once you have submitted a work, it will not be returned. Submissions may be disqualified at any time for non-compliance with these Official Rules. CineSpace makes the final determination as to which Submissions are eligible to take part in this Competition. NASA is the sole judge of the prizewinners. CineSpace will not notify you of any disqualification or the reasons for such disqualification.

ANY ATTEMPT TO ENTER THE COMPETITION EXCEPT AS PROVIDED ABOVE IS VOID.

4. REQUIREMENTS AND JUDGING CONSIDERATIONS

Each Submission must comply with the following rules:

  • It must be an original work by you (apart from the NASA imagery), meaning that you (or the minor you as a parent are submitting for) were one of the work’s principal creators and have the right to submit it to the Submissions Portal and grant the licenses set forth in Terms below.
  • It must have been created after January 1,
  • It must either be in the English language or have English subtitles (to the extent it contains dialogue or text).
  • It must be no longer than 10 minutes, including credits.
  • It must contain at least 10% (total time basis of actual work – not including end credits) of NASA Imagery, which may be found on the NASA Archive or other publicly available sources. (NASA Imagery may be altered with After Effects or other techniques).
  • Initial review copies of your works may be uploaded to the Tongal website at HD p  16X9 with acceptable file formats: .mov, .avi, .mp4, .wmv,  and acceptable codecs: H (MP4), MPEG-4, H, MPGV, WMV, DivX. However, Cinespace screens all selections at the highest resolution, p format. Should you win, you will also be required to provide a p .mov master file, using a ProRes, Animation, or Uncompressed Codec. If your film is in any aspect ratio other than 16X9, you are responsible for adding in appropriate pillar boxes or letter boxes, so that the final file comes in at X without distorting your creative intent.  In addition, any non-English language works will be required to submit a version without subtitles and provide either an English subtitle transcript or SRT file with English subtitles – based on p file.

  • If your film was created using a cell phone, please be advised that portrait cell phone footage is difficult to present on screen. It is highly recommended to shoot any video using a cell phone in the landscape or horizontal orientation.
  • It must not be an excerpt from a longer work.
  • It must comply with all of the content restrictions set forth in Terms. Among other things, ANY USE OF THIRD PARTY MUSIC IN THE SUBMISSION MUST BE PRE-CLEARED WITH THE APPLICABLE OWNERS/LICENSORS.
  • You must have the right to grant the licenses set forth in Terms.

When submitting to the Submissions Portal you must select the best-fitting genre. CineSpace reserves the right to change the genre.

Selection of Finalists

A team of specialists from NASA and HCAS will select Finalists based on considerations set forth below. All Finalists will be “CineSpace Finalists” and their works will screen at Houston Cinema Arts Festival November , . The Finalists’ works will also be posted on the HCAS website and various NASA websites. Subsequent screenings may take place at special events throughout the remaining year and a compilation of the finalists may be submitted for screening in its entirety to other collaborating film festivals internationally. All Finalists will be notified of website posts and all screenings.

Awarding of Prizes

One or more NASA judges will award the prizes as listed below:

Competition Awards

  • Grand Prize: USD $10,
  • Second Prize: USD $5,
  • Third Prize: USD $3,

Optional: Special Judging Categories and Awards for

  • Film Best Depicting Innovation and Inclusion in Science and Technology: USD $4,
  • Film Best Depicting Concept of "Moon, Mars, and Beyond": USD $4,

Criteria for Special Judging Categories: In general, the Jury is looking for Submissions that elevate the featured themes using creative and original cinematic and/or storytelling techniques. If the jury feels that a Submission meets these criteria, the Submission may be considered for this Award. If no submissions sufficiently meet the criteria, this category may not be awarded this year.

Film Best Depicting Innovation and Inclusion in Science and Technology: USD $4,

The Jury will use the following NASA statement as a guide: “Innovation and Inclusion encourages open-minded attitudes about the unique diversity of the team and recognizes the contributions to innovation that diversity brings.  The ultimate goal is to create a culture where everyone is valued and contributes fully to the success of the mission and where innovation happens everyday."

Film Best Depicting Concept of "Moon, Mars, and Beyond": USD $4,

The Jury will use the following NASA statement as a guide: “NASA aims to inspire the next generation of human exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, leading to human expansion across the solar system, returning humans to the Moon for long-term exploration and utilization, followed by human missions to Mars and other destinations."

All remaining finalists receive Official Selection mention.

All genres will be considered for all prizes.

The Selection Committee and Competition Judges (collectively the “Jury”) understand that various genres and formats have different dominant qualities.

5. CONTENT RESTRICTIONS

Your Submission must comply with the content restrictions and guidelines in the Terms and any NASA Imagery Archive restrictions.

This summary of key points of Restrictions and Limitations on Use of NASA Material is provided for convenience. The full restrictions are available here:NASA IMAGERY ARCHIVES RESTRICTIONS 

  • You shall not state or imply the endorsement by NASA or by any NASA employee of a commercial product, service, or activity, or use NASA imagery in any manner that might mislead.
  • You are informed that it is unlawful to falsely claim copyright or other rights in NASA material and therefore, you may not claim copyright or other rights in any NASA Material used in any of your Videos.
  • You agree that NASA shall in no way be liable for any costs, expenses, claims, or demands arising out of your use of NASA Material.
  • NASA does not indemnify nor hold harmless users of NASA Material, nor release such users from copyright infringement, nor grant exclusive use rights with respect to NASA Material.
  • NASA Material is not protected by copyright unless noted. If copyrighted, permission should be obtained from the copyright owner prior to use. If not copyrighted, NASA Material may be reproduced and distributed without further permission from NASA.
  • If a recognizable person, or talent (e.g., an astronaut or a noted personality engaged to narrate a film) appears in NASA material, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. Therefore, permission should be obtained from the recognizable person or talent, if the proposed use of the NASA Material could be viewed as a commercial exploitation of that person. However, if the intended use of NASA Material is primarily for communicative purposes, i.e., books, newspapers, and magazines reporting facts of historical significance (constitutionally protected media uses), then such uses will generally be considered not to infringe such personal rights.
  • Some NASA audiovisual material may incorporate music or footage, which is copyrighted and licensed for the particular NASA work. Any editing or otherwise altering of the work may not be covered under the original license, and therefore would require permission of the copyright owner.
  • NASA audiovisual material may include visible NASA identifiers (e.g., the name of the vehicle and the NASA Insignia or Logotype in photographs or film footage of Space Shuttle vehicles). Use of such materials is generally non-objectionable, provided the NASA identifiers appear in their factual context.

In addition and without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Submission must also comply with the restrictions below:

  • The Submission may not contain obscene or pornographic material; contain threats to any entity, place, group, or world peace; or violate any applicable laws.
  • The Submission may not infringe any third party’s intellectual property rights or infringe any third party’s privacy rights.
  • The Submission must not contain any third party work, INCLUDING ANY MUSICAL RECORDING OR COMPOSITION, unless (1) you have a license to use such work in the Submission from the owners/licensors; (2) such work is in the public domain; (3) your use of such work is clearly “fair use” under United States copyright law.
  • Where required by law, you must have obtained appropriate releases for every person who appears recognizably in your Submission.
  • No live animals may be used in the creation of a Submission unless you have obtained the consent of the animal’s owner and an affidavit from the animal owner or wrangler stating that the animal was not harmed in the making of the Submission.
  • You must not breach any contractual obligation in submitting your Submission.
  • You must provide any licenses, permissions, or releases to CineSpace upon request. Failure to provide such documentation or comply with any the foregoing requirements (in CineSpace’s sole determination) may result in the disqualification of your Submission.
  • By entering your Submission, you represent and warrant that it complies with the requirements set forth in this Section 5.

NOTE:  For convenience only the Submitter’s Agreement text is copied in this section below. 


SUBMITTER’S AGREEMENT

Please Read This Carefully! You are agreeing to a Submitter Agreement (SA) for this particular competition only. For the purposes of this SA, “Submitter” refers to either the person creating and submitting the Submission or the person submitting the Submission on behalf of an individual under the age of


If you click “I agree” and proceed to the Submission Page for this competition, this Submitter Agreement (“SA”) will be a valid and binding agreement between you and The Service and in addition to the existing Terms of Use for all purposes relating to this competition. Please print and keep a copy of this SA. No provisions you may have agreed to that are specific to any other individual short film competition will apply.

  1. As a Submitter you may submit to CineSpace your idea (e.g., your video submission) (hereinafter referred to as a “Submission”) to the CineSpace Short Film Competition to which this SA relates. The Service will make reasonable efforts to provide access for your Submissions to NASA; however, if the content of the Submission is not appropriate, The Service and NASA reserve the right to exclude the Submission from the competition without prior warning. In addition, by submitting your Submission you thereby agree to provide reasonable assistance and additional information concerning your Submission to CineSpace, Houston Cinema Arts Society, or NASA, if requested.
  1. Acceptance of Submission and License to Use. CineSpace will notify you within a reasonable period of time after the end of the submittal Period whether your Submission has been selected by NASA for an Award. NASA will judge all Submissions against the guidelines set out in the competition and determine, in its sole discretion, which Submission best addresses the competition guidelines. NASA has absolute and sole discretion to determine whether to accept your Submission, or any Submission, and whether to make an Award, or multiple Awards. Submitter acknowledges and agrees that The Service is not responsible for and has no liability for selection of a winning Submission.  Submitter further agrees to hold The Service legally harmless in regard to selection of a winning Submitter. Submitter agrees to hold The Service legally harmless for any advice it may provide as to the quality or suitability of submitted Submissions and agrees to waive any claim against The Service for Submitter’s failure to win an award. The meeting of the CineSpace guidelines does not automatically mean that the Submission will be eligible for an Award. Submissions must NOT contain or include ideas, concepts, solutions or technology in respect of which a third party owns or controls the intellectual property. Submissions and descriptions thereof may not include trademarks or trade names of corporations or entities without the permission of their owners. By entering, you represent and warrant that:
  • your entire Submission is an original work by you and you have not included third-party content (including, but not limited to, writing, text, graphics, artwork, logos, photographs, dialogue from plays, likeness of any third party, musical recordings, clips of videos, television programs or motion pictures) in or in connection with your Submission, unless (a) otherwise requested by NASA and/or disclosed by you in your Submission, (b) provided by NASA for use in this specific Challenge and subject to the limitations and restrictions set forth in Section 6 of this SA; and (c) you have either obtained the rights to use such third-party content or the content of the Submission is considered in the public domain without any limitations on use;
  • you hereby indemnify NASA and any person acting on behalf of NASA against any liability, including costs and expenses incurred as a result of (1) violation of trade secrets, copyrights, or right of privacy or publicity, arising out of the creation, delivery, publication or use of any Submission furnished under this SA; or (2) any libelous or other unlawful matter contained in such Submission;
  • you have all the rights, licenses, permissions and consents necessary to submit the Submission and to grant all of the rights that you have granted to NASA hereunder, including the right for NASA to use and develop derivative works of and from the Submission;
  • you understand, recognize and accept that NASA has access to, may create or has created materials and ideas which may be similar or identical to the Submission in concept, theme, idea, format or other respects. You acknowledge and agree that NASA shall have the right to use such same or similar materials, and that you will not be entitled to any compensation arising from NASA’s use of such materials. In the event that your entry is identical or similar to the Submission of another Submitter, NASA reserves the right, at the sole discretion of NASA, to either score one Submission higher than the other subject to the Challenge Statement guidelines or to randomly choose a Submission from all of those submitted which respond to the Challenge Statement guidelines.
  • all persons who were engaged by you to work on the Submission or who appear in the Submission in any manner have:


      1. given you their express, irrevocable written consent to submit the Submission for unlimited, royalty-free use, exhibition and other exploitation in any manner, for any purpose (including but not limited to public performances in one or more film festivals), and in any and all media, whether now existing or hereafter discovered, throughout the world, in perpetuity;
      2. provided written, irrevocable permission to include their name, image or pictures in or with your Submission (or if a minor who is not your child, you must have the permission of their parent or legal guardian) and you may be asked by NASA to provide permission in writing;
      3. no claims for payment of any kind, including, without limitation, for royalties or residuals, has no approval or consultation rights or any rights of participation arising out of any use, exhibition or other exploitation of the Submission; and
      4. not been and are not currently under any union or guild agreement that results in any ongoing obligations resulting from the use, exhibition or other exploitation of the Submission; and

All intellectual property rights (e.g., Copyrights), if any, in original works CREATED by YOU in ALL Submissions (e.g., in the VIDEO SUBMISSION, COMPILATION, idea, or concept) SUBMITTED BY YOU IN RESPONSE TO THIS CHALLENGE will remain with YOU, the Submitter

By entering, you agree that: (i) you hereby grant to NASA and Houston Cinema Arts Society a fully transferable, paid-up, royalty free, non-exclusive, irrevocable, world-wide license in all intellectual property (e.g., in any copyright asserted by you) in original works created by you in all Submissions submitted by you in response to this challenge for use in any manner, for any purpose, and in any and all media; (ii) NASA, Houston Cinema Arts Society and their authorized representatives have the unlimited right to alter and/or edit all Submission or any part or element thereof; and (iii) NASA, Houston Cinema Arts Society and their licensees, successors and assigns have the paid-up, royalty-free, irrevocable, right to use any and all Submissions, and the names, likenesses, voices and images of all persons appearing in all Submissions in any manner, for any purpose (including but not limited to public performances in one or more film festivals), and in any medium now known or hereafter devised throughout the world in perpetuity.

Please also be aware that your Submission(s) may not be acknowledged and will not be received or held “in confidence” and your Submission(s) does/do not create a confidential relationship or obligation of secrecy between you and any of the entities involved in this Challenge.

  1. If NASA selects your Submission for an Award, the payment amount specified in the CineSpace Guidelines posted on the Service by NASA shall be paid to you by The Service within thirty (30) days after occurrence of each of the following: 1) you are notified by CineSpace of your Submission’s selection, and 2) the completion of certain verification procedures by The Service, and review and acceptance of such results by NASA, and 3) The Service’s receipt of Award payment from NASA. Payment of any Award is conditioned upon your cooperation with The Service’s verification procedures. The Award will be paid to you locally, in U.S. Dollars, or if required by your local law, in your local currency equivalent based on the foreign exchange rate in effect on the date of the disbursement by The Service. The Service is not responsible for payment of any Award, or any part of any Award, to any party other than to the Submitter through whom the Submission was submitted to The Service. You understand that the Award represents a complete payment, net of any local taxes or transfer fees that The Service may be required to withhold, for any Accepted Submission and that you are not entitled to any other compensation of any kind. If local law does not require withholding of taxes, all taxes on Awards shall be your sole responsibility.
  1. GENERAL CONDITIONS. NASA has the right to verify each Submitter’s eligibility and compliance with this SA. NASA is a third-party beneficiary of this SA, with the right to enforce the terms and conditions hereof directly against you. Participation is conditioned on providing data required on the Service. Personal data will be processed in accordance with The Service’s Privacy Policy which can be located at a link to be provided no later than June 1, Submitters should direct any request to access, update, or correct information to CineSpace at [email protected] Neither The Service nor NASA is responsible for human error, theft, destruction, or damage to Submissions, or other factors beyond its reasonable control.

Submitters should not register with multiple e-mail and/or street addresses. In the event of a dispute as to any Submission, the authorized account holder of the email address used to enter will be deemed to be the person who submitted the Submission. The authorized “account holder” is the natural person assigned an email address by an internet access provider, online service provider or other entity responsible for assigning email addresses for the domain associated with the submitted address.

  1. Representations and Warranties. You represent and warrant that:
  • All information provided by you regarding yourself and, if applicable, your business (“Submitter Information”) is true, accurate, current, and complete information and you will maintain and update the Submitter Information to keep it true, accurate, current and complete.
  • If you are an individual representing a business or other entity, you are authorized to enter into this Agreement on behalf of that business or entity.
  • Unless otherwise disclosed in the Submission, you are the owner of the Submission and the Submission does not infringe or violate any patent, copyright, trade secret, trademark or other third-party intellectual property right.
  • You have the right to grant the license in the Submission as required by Section 2 of this SA.
  1. Restrictions and Limitations on Use of NASA Materials.
  • You shall not state or imply the endorsement by NASA or by any NASA employee of a commercial product, service, or activity, or used in any manner that might mislead.
  • You are informed that it is unlawful to falsely claim copyright or other rights in NASA material and therefore, you may not claim copyright or other rights in any NASA material used in any of your Submissions.
  • You agree that NASA shall in no way be liable for any costs, expenses, claims, or demands arising out of your use of NASA material.
  • NASA does not indemnify nor hold harmless users of NASA material, nor release such users from copyright infringement, nor grant exclusive use rights with respect to NASA material.
  • NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted. If copyrighted, permission should be obtained from the copyright owner prior to use. If not copyrighted, NASA material may be reproduced and distributed without further permission from NASA.
  • If a recognizable person, or talent (e.g., an astronaut or a noted personality engaged to narrate a film) appears in NASA material, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. Therefore, permission should be obtained from the recognizable person or talent, if the proposed use of the NASA material could be viewed as a commercial exploitation of that person. However, if the intended use of NASA material is primarily for communicative purposes, i.e., books, newspapers, and magazines reporting facts of historical significance (constitutionally protected media uses), then such uses will generally be considered not to infringe such personal rights.
  • Some NASA audiovisual material may incorporate music or footage, which is copyrighted and licensed for the particular NASA work. Any editing or otherwise altering of the work may not be covered under the original license, and therefore would require permission of the copyright owner.
  • NASA audiovisual material may include visible NASA identifiers (e.g., the name of the vehicle and the NASA Insignia or Logotype in photographs or film footage of Space Shuttle vehicles). Use of such materials is generally non-objectionable, provided the NASA identifiers appear in their factual context.
  1. In the case of any conflict between the terms of this SA and the Terms of Use, this SA controls.
Sours: https://tongal.com/project/NASACinespace_/

You will also be interested:

Best Websites to Download Public Domain Videos

In historic terms, cinema is still a relatively new art, and yet the amount of footage that has been filmed since the Lumière brothers released their first film is staggering. Capturing unique materials that were never seen by the world before has become the question of prestige among the filmmakers. Nonetheless, certain genres of film are almost entirely dependent on the public domain footage. Documentaries about historic events, space or any other topic that is impossible to stage rely on the videos that entered the public domain for one reason or the other. That’s why in this article, we are going to take you through some of the best websites that let you download public domain videos.

What is Public Domain Video?

Any video that is not subject to copyright can be considered a public domain video. This means that anyone can use this footage for free without having to ask for permission to do so. Videos can enter the public domain under the following circumstances:

  • If the footage was produced by a government because governments are obligated by the law to offer the footage to the public domain.
  • In case the author of the footage has forfeited his or her copyrights and dedicated the footage to the public domain
  • A film or any other work of art becomes public domain 70 years after the death of the copyright holder. The expiration date of the copyrights is not the same in all the countries around the world, which is why you must make sure that the video you want to use is, in fact, a public domain video.

In addition, you should avoid using the footage that contains art or music that can be described as third-party intellectual property because you may unintentionally infringe copyrights.

Best Online Websites Where You Can Download Public Domain Videos

Finding free public domain footage or public movies on the Internet has never been too difficult, as you can watch thousands of public domain movies on YouTube, but you cannot download them. Over the course of the last couple of decades, the websites where you can download public domain footage have grown in number, which makes it somewhat easier to find the video clips you can use in your projects for free. Here are some of the best online destinations where you can download public domain videos.

1.Prelinger Archive

Public Domain Video Download

With more than 17, items in the collection, the Prelinger Archive is probably one of the largest public domain video libraries on the Internet. The archive was founded in by Rick Prelinger, but by it became a part of the Library of Congress Motion Picture Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Divison’s collection. You can download public domain video clips created by educational institutions, advertising companies, trade associations or corporations from this impressive collection. There are different download options available for each file, so you can choose the size of a file and the method you’re going to use to download a file to your computer.

2.The Public Domain Review

Public Domain Video Collections

This is an excellent resource for researchers looking for essays, books, audio recordings, images or old films. The movies are divided into different categories such as Animals&Beasts, Politics, War or Sports which makes locating and downloading public domain videos faster and easier. The Public Domain Review offers footage that is available within different public domain licenses, so you must make sure that the film you want to download can be used for the purpose you have in mind. The vast majority of the films in this archive are from the last decade of the 19th and the first half of the 20th century. That’s why The Public Domain Review’s selection of films can only be useful if you are researching a topic from that era.

3.The National Screening Room

National Screening Room Public Domain Video Collection

The National Screening Room is a project created by the Library of Congress National Audio-Visual Conservation Center with the aim of making the videos from their collection available to the viewers around the world. The vast majority of the videos in the collection were filmed during the 20th century, but there are only a few videos available that are produced outside of the United States. The National Screening Room can be a valuable asset if you are looking for videos you can use for educational or research videos that cover topics that range from the development of the arms industry to the daily life of great American inventors.

4.Pond5’s Public Domain Project

Pond 5 Public Domain Video Download

Industry professionals don’t need an introduction to the Pond5 platform, because it is probably the largest online marketplace for royalty-free media at the moment. Their Public Domain Project contains a thousand public videos that can be downloaded for free, but the duration of these videos is limited to just two minutes To make things worse, most of these public domain videos don’t have audio, so you can only use them if you already have a soundtrack for the video you’re making. The platform offers powerful search tools that enable you to look for videos based on different parameters. You can download public domain videos in HD resolution, but you must create an account on Pond5 before you can save them to your computer. 

5.Pexels

Pexels Public Domain Video Collection

Free public domain stock footage can be used on different types of projects, and it is usually a great choice if you’re looking for some extra shots that will make a scene in your video more cinematic. Pexels offers an impressive collection of free public domain stock videos, so you just have to insert a search term and pick a video clip that best fits your needs. The duration of the free videos you can find on Pexels rarely exceeds thirty seconds, which makes it difficult to make an entire video exclusively from free public domain stock footage. Hence it is better to use Pexels as a complementary source of shots in case you can’t go back to the filming location.

6.Vidsplay

All video clips you can find on this platform are free, so you just have to select one of the categories and start browsing through the available public domain stock footage. The only condition to use the stock footage on private or commercial projects for free is to credit the Vidsplay platform in the end credits, on the website or in the description of the videos you upload to your social media channels. All stock videos on Vidsplay are available in HD or 4K resolution, and you simply have to click on the Download button below a particular video to save it.

7.The Moving Image Archive

This is yet another archive of public domain videos you can find on the Arhive.org that features countless collections of texts, images, and videos. Within the Moving Image Archive, you can find different collections that contain full feature movies, art videos, animations, cartoons or television footage. The public domain videos hosted on The Moving Image Archive cover a broad range of topics, but some of them can be in poor resolution. The Moving Image Archive can be an excellent source of footage for anyone who wants to download public domain video clips and use them in their commercial or non-commercial projects.

8.PublicDomainFootage

BBC, National Geographics or NBC are just a few among many famous television networks that use the services of PublicDomainFootage. All content on the platform is divided into Archival Footage and Historic Newsreels sections that contain categories like Atomic Age, Civil Rights or Pop Culture. You can also use PublicDomainFootage to research a particular topic and request content that is not uploaded to the website. You can download a public domain video after you pay a one time fee that enables you to use that video as many times as you want. The platform’s YouTube channel provides an easy way of searching for public domain videos you are going to use in your next documentary film.

9.NASA’s Video Gallery

Space exploration is undoubtedly one of the hottest topics of our era, so if you are looking for some space public domain videos NASA’s website is the best place to start. Like all other government institutions, NASA is obligated by the law to offer all images and videos to the public domain. This means that all content you download from their website is free to use. Simply insert the search term and browse the results until you find the video clip you want to save to your computer. However, most public domain videos you can download from NASA’s website last only a couple of minutes.

Motion Elements

The collection of free public domain stock footage, this website offers contains more than 4, clips. Categories like Cityscape, Animals or Water contain hundreds of stock videos, so you just have to open one of the available categories and locate the video clip you want to download. However, you must first create an account on Motion Elements before you can save video files to your computer. In addition, the platform doesn’t allow you to make more than five downloads per week and you must invite your friends to join the platform if you want to increase the weekly number of downloads. Even so, Motion Elements is a great source of stock footage you can use without any restrictions.

Is It Okay to Use Public Domain Videos for Commercial Purposes?

All public domain videos can be used for both commercial and non-commercial projects, but you must approach using public domain videos for commercial purposes with caution. Crediting the author or providing the source from which you acquired the footage will reduce the likelihood of legal complications. The public domain videos that feature famous actors or third party intellectual property can also be a subject of legal disputes, which is why it is better to avoid using them on commercial projects.

What Should You Do If You Can’t Find Public Domain Footage for Your Project?

Opting for videos that are protected by the Creative Commons licenses is probably the safest option if you’re struggling to find the public domain footage you’d like to use in your project. Respecting the terms of the license under which a video is protected is of utmost importance, since failing to properly credit the author of the video, for instance, can have legal consequences. There are several different types of Creative Commons licenses and you must find out which one covers the video you’d like to use, before publishing your video. You can find more information about Creative Commons licenses at the FAQ.

Conclusion

Public domain videos cover very different topics, which means that the nature of your project determines the source from which you’ll acquire the footage. If you are researching the early days of cinema, then you’ll have no trouble downloading the public domain videos, but if the topic you’re exploring is more contemporary, finding the content you can use without any restrictions can prove to be troublesome. Which website do you like to use the most to download public domain videos? Leave a comment and share your opinions with us.

author avatar

Liza Brown

Liza Brown is a writer and a lover of all things video.

Follow @Liza Brown

Sours: https://filmora.wondershare.com/video-editing-tips/best-websites-download-free-public-domain-footage.html


13099 13100 13101 13102 13103