Halloween: resurrection wiki

Halloween: resurrection wiki DEFAULT

Halloween H 20 Years Later

horror film directed by Steve Miner

Halloween H 20 Years Later (also known as simply Halloween H20) is a American slasher film directed by Steve Miner, and starring Jamie Lee Curtis, Adam Arkin, Michelle Williams, and Josh Hartnett. It is the seventh installment in the Halloween franchise. Retconning the Jamie Lloyd story arc of the previous three installments, H20 is a direct sequel to the first two films and follows a post-traumaticLaurie Strode, who has faked her death in order to go into hiding from her brother, Michael Myers, who finds her working at a private boarding school in California.

Released in the United States on August 5, , Halloween H20 grossed $75 million worldwide on a budget of $17 million, and received mixed-to-positive reviews from critics, with many considering it to be the best sequel in the series. A sequel, Halloween: Resurrection (), was released four years later.

Plot[edit]

On October 29, , Michael Myers (Chris Durand), burglarizes Dr. Sam Loomis' (voiced by Tom Kane) retirement house in Langdon, Illinois. Loomis' former colleague, Marion Chambers (Nancy Stephens), who took care of Dr. Loomis until he died, arrives and discovers that the file on Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), who is presumed dead in an automobile accident, is missing. Michael murders her, her teenage neighbor Jimmy (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) and his friend Tony (Branden Williams), before leaving the house in Jimmy’s car with Laurie's file.

In Summer Glen, California, Laurie, having faked her death to avoid Michael, lives under an assumed name "Keri Tate", having a career as the headmistress of Hillcrest Academy, a private boarding school. Laurie is also in a relationship with Hillcrest guidance counselor Will Brennan (Adam Arkin). However, Laurie is far from happy, as the tragic events from still haunt her; she lives in fear that her brother may return for her. While a woman and her daughter are at a rest stop, Michael steals their car. At the academy campus, the students leave to attend a school trip to Yosemite, leaving only Laurie, Will, security guard Ronny Jones (LL Cool J), Laurie's son, John, (Josh Hartnett) and his girlfriend Molly Cartwell (Michelle Williams) and their classmates Charlie Deveraux (Adam Hann-Byrd) and his girlfriend Sarah Wainthrope (Jodi Lyn O'Keefe), who are having a Halloween party in the school basement.

Later that night, Laurie reveals her true identity to Will and realizing that Michael has most likely returned to kill her upon realizing that John is the same age she was when the murders from happened. Michael, meanwhile arrives with a stolen old panel truck at Hillcrest and kills Charlie and Sarah. John and Molly are chased by Michael through the school grounds. Will and Laurie save John and Molly from Michael, and he and Laurie come face-to-face for the first time in twenty years. Will accidentally shoots Ronny, who had been patrolling the hallway, when he mistakes Ronny's shadow for Michael, and Michael kills Will while Will and Laurie are examining Ronny's body.

Laurie manages to get John and Molly to safety, and realizing that she'll never be safe from Michael as long as he's alive, starts fighting Michael face to face. Laurie stabs Michael numerous times and pushes him over a balcony. She prepares to stab him again, but Ronny, who survived the shooting, convinces her to stop. The authorities arrive at the scene and load Michael into a coroner's van, but Laurie, knowing that Michael is still alive, steals the van to kill him for good. Michael awakens and attacks Laurie, who stops, causing Michael to fly through the windshield. Laurie drives the van into Michael, and she proceeds to drive off the road, down a steep hill. Laurie tumbles out, and Michael is pinned between the van and a tree. Michael reaches out to Laurie and they almost touch hands right before she decapitates him with a fire axe.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The original idea for the seventh Halloween film began as the second half of the treatment written by Daniel Farrands during pre-production of Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, which he later submitted as a new treatment entitled Michael Myers: Lord of the Dead.[5][6] The story would have opened immediately after the events of the previous film and involved Tommy Doyle discovering that the entire town of Haddonfield was involved in a conspiracy to control Michael Myers. Farrands compared the story to The Wicker Man, The Hitcher, Rosemary's Baby, Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," and Dennis Etchison's rejected screenplay for Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers.[6][7] Farrands later decided not to continue with the series "since I honestly could not bear to watch another one of my scripts turned into a debacle – especially another Halloween."[5]

Another idea pitched after the Farrands treatment was Halloween 7: Two Faces of Evil, written by Robert Zappia. Originally intended to be a direct-to-video film, this would have involved Michael Myers stalking an all women's boarding school. The plot eventually also revealed a copycat killer, causing many fans to compare such a twist to The Silence of the Lambs. The pitch itself was changed a couple of times, changing the title to Halloween: Blood Ties as they involved Laurie Strode into the storyline, before scrapping the idea entirely.[8]

The screenplay was based on a story by Kevin Williamson,[9] with the original working title for the film being Halloween 7: The Revenge of Laurie Strode.[10] Williamson was initially hired to write a script, and the story was situated as a sequel to the previous six films, thereby keeping the timeline's continuity.[10][11][better&#;source&#;needed] When Williamson first outlined Halloween H20, he created the storyline in which Laurie Strode has faked her own death and taken on a new identity as a specific way of retconning the character's death in Halloween 4. In Williamson's original treatment, there are scenes in which a Hillcrest student does a report on Michael Myers' killing spree, mentioning the death of Jamie, complete with flashbacks to 4–6 mentioned in the text. "Keri"/Laurie responds to hearing the student's report on the death of her daughter by going into a restroom and throwing up.[12]

In the film, the voice of Dr. Loomis is heard giving the same speech that he gave to Sheriff Brackett when they were inside Michael's abandoned childhood home in the original film. Audio clips from Halloween were initially considered when playing his monologue.[citation needed] However, instead of the voice of Donald Pleasence himself, sound-alike voice actor Tom Kane provides this voice-over.

John Carpenter was originally in consideration to be the director for this particular follow-up since Curtis wanted to reunite the cast and crew of the original to have active involvement in it. It was believed that Carpenter opted out because he wanted no active part in the sequel; however, this is not the case. Carpenter agreed to direct the film, but his starting fee as director was $10 million, so he demanded a three-picture deal with Dimension Films. Carpenter's bargain was denied by the Weinsteins, and therefore no deal took place. Carpenter rationalized this by believing the hefty fee was compensation for revenue he had never received from the original Halloween, a matter that was still a contention between Carpenter and Halloween producer Moustapha Akkad even after twenty years. When Akkad balked at Carpenter's fee, Carpenter quit the project. Steve Miner assumed directing.

Scream writer/producer Kevin Williamson was involved in various areas of production. Although not directly credited, he provided rewrites in character dialogue and helped make alterations and sketches of the script. He also came up with the paramedic storyline that explained how Michael survived the ending, which was partially filmed the day after principal photography ended and later utilized in the film's sequel. The writers of Halloween H20 were left with a dilemma when Curtis wanted to end the series, but Moustapha Akkad had a clause that legally wouldn't allow the writers to kill Michael Myers off. According to the Blu-ray released by Scream Factory, Curtis almost left the project just weeks before filming, until Kevin Williamson came up with the paramedic storyline and presented it to Akkad. Curtis finally agreed to be a part of the film under the condition that no footage hinting toward a sequel would be presented by the film, and that the audience would believe that Michael was dead until the inevitable sequel was announced. Halloween: Resurrection's first shot of Michael in the paramedic uniform was filmed the day after H20's principal photography ended, according to H20's editor, Patrick Lussier.[13]

Music[edit]

The original music score was composed by John Ottman, but some music from Scream was added to the chase scenes later on during post-production. Ottman expressed some displeasure about this action in an interview featured on the Halloween: 25 Years of Terror DVD released in Ottman's score was supplemented with Marco Beltrami's scores from Scream, Scream 2, and Mimic by a team of music editors as well as new cues written by Beltrami during the final days of sound mixing on the film.[14][better&#;source&#;needed] Dimension Films chief Bob Weinstein demanded musical changes after being dissatisfied with Ottman's score,[15] instating the song "What's This Life For" by rock music group Creed, which is featured in the film during a party sequence and also during the end credits.

In addition a small tribute to Bernard Herrman's score from Psycho can be heard as Janet Leigh's character Norma Watson walks to her car before leaving work for the day.

No official soundtrack was ever released for the film, but a compilation album by Ottman was released in the United States and Germany under the Varèse Sarabande label and includes the original score by Ottman and numerous other cuts.

Alternate television version[edit]

In February , the FX network premiered an alternate version of the film, adding and extending footage not seen in the original release. It has yet to be released anywhere else, but the deleted scenes can be found on YouTube.[16]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Until the release of the film Halloween, Halloween H20 was the highest-grossing film in the Halloween franchise. It was released on August 5, in the US and later in many other countries. H20 cost $17 million to produce and returned $55,, in domestic box office sales with an opening weekend of $16,,, and $24,, since its Wednesday debut.[3] The film also had an gross of €3,, in Germany equivalent to $3,,[17] Internationally it grossed $20 million for a worldwide total of $75 million.[4]

Critical response[edit]

On review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes the film holds an approval rating of 52% based on 61 reviews, with an average rating of / The website's critical consensus reads: "Halloween: H20 is the best of the many sequels, yet still pales in comparison to the original Halloween."[18] On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 52 out of , based on 20 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[19] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B-" on an A+ to F scale.[20]

Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times awarded the film two out of four stars,[21] while Lawrence Van Gelder of The New York Times wrote that "the throwaway jokes are few and far between, and after a pre-title sequence reintroduces Michael and shows just how far up suspense and thrills can be ratcheted, Halloween H20 declines into the routine," adding: "Nobody is going to be surprised by who lives and who dies."[22] Bob Graham of the San Francisco Chronicle praised the film's referentiality, as well as Curtis's performance, writing: "Slasher films often seem merely a joke, and with good reason, but in this case that's too bad. Curtis, with her plain, unglamorous appearance, rises to the occasion and delivers as compelling a performance as any this summer."[23] Writing for the Austin Chronicle, Marc Savlov said of the film: "Miner strives to imbue the film with the requisite autumnal haze of the original but then gives up midway through and instead resorts to the standard stalk 'n' slash formulas. It's heartening to see a beloved character revived like this (at one point during the screening I attended, audience members actually stood up and cheered), but H20—for all its good, gory intentions—is barely a shadow of the original."[24]

Home media[edit]

Halloween H20 was released on VHS and LaserDisc by Buena Vista Home Video. In the United Kingdom, the film was released on VHS on December 15,

The film was first released on DVD by Dimension Films on October 19, as part of the "Dimension Collector's Series". It was released in the UK on October 22, and re-released on April 25, It was also released in the UK in as part of the complete collection consisting of the first eight films, a set that is now out of print. It was re-released in the US by Echo Bridge Home Entertainment on April 26, , although, it does not contain its original aspect ratio of , but rather a widescreen transfer.[25] Echo Bridge later re-released the film in a triple feature set with Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers and Halloween: Resurrection.[26]

Halloween H20 was released in Canada on Blu-ray by Alliance along with Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers and Halloween: Resurrection on January 12, [27] On May 3, it was released by Echo Bridge Home Entertainment in the US but with an open matte transfer, rather than the theatrical aspect ratio of Its sound was downmixed to stereo, rather than the theatrical mix. The Blu-ray received negative reviews, with Blu-ray.com calling it "a mess on every level".[28] It was also released along with Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers in one Blu-ray collection.[29]

It was released again on Blu-ray on September 23, in its original theatrical aspect ratio and with DTS-HD Master Audio in the Halloween: The Complete Collection box set from Anchor Bay Entertainment, with a disc produced by Scream Factory, featuring a new commentary with Jamie Lee Curtis and Steve Miner and extra features including behind the scenes footage and archival interviews not seen on any other release.[28]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Halloween: H20". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 8,
  2. ^"Halloween H20 - 20 Years Later". British Board of Film Classification. Retrieved December 23,
  3. ^ ab"Halloween: H20 ()". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 20,
  4. ^ abKlady, Leonard (January 25, ). "The Top Worldwide". Variety. p.&#;
  5. ^ ab"Daniel Farrands Interview ()". 73 Miles to Haddonfield. Retrieved January 5,
  6. ^ ab"[Interview] Daniel Farrands Reveals 'Halloween 6' and '7' That Could Have Been". Halloween Daily News. October 24, Retrieved January 5,
  7. ^"Halloween 6 writer reveals sequel's insane original ending". Elm. October 3, Retrieved January 5,
  8. ^Millman, Ashleigh (May 8, ). "Every Halloween Movie (They Never Actually Made)". WhatCulture.com. Retrieved September 17,
  9. ^"Halloween H 20 Years Later". HORRORPEDIA. October 20, Retrieved October 5,
  10. ^ ab"Halloween H20 Original Script Continued Jamie Lloyd's Story". ScreenRant. April 14, Retrieved April 15,
  11. ^"Halloween H Twenty Years Later: Did You Know?". LairofHorror.Tripod.com. Retrieved October 5,
  12. ^Williamson, Kevin. "Halloween 7 treatment
  13. ^Wallace, Amy (August 4, ). "Horror Comes Full Circle in 'H20'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 5,
  14. ^Blood is Thicker Than Water – The Making of Halloween: H20. Halloween: The Complete Collection(Blu-ray). Scream Factory.
  15. ^Halloween: H20 score at Filmtracks. Retrieved March 31,
  16. ^Wurm, Gerald (December 6, ). "Halloween H 20 Years Later (Comparison: Theatrical Version - TV Version) - Movie-Censorship.com". Movie-Censorship.com. Retrieved March 31,
  17. ^[1][bare URL]
  18. ^"Halloween H20 ()". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved December 13,
  19. ^"Halloween H 20 Years Later Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved September 8,
  20. ^"CinemaScore". cinemascore.com. Archived from the original on September 16, Retrieved August 22,
  21. ^Ebert, Roger (August 5, ). "Halloween H20". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved October 30, &#; via RogerEbert.com.2/5 stars
  22. ^Van Gelder, Lawrence (August 5, ). "'Halloween H20': Monster and Victim: Older Not Wiser". The New York Times. Retrieved October 31,
  23. ^Graham, Bob (August 5, ). "Sweet Revenge: Jamie Lee Curtis returns to face down her killer brother in 'Halloween: H20'". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved November 5,
  24. ^Savlov, Marc (August 7, ). "Halloween H Twenty Years Later". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved November 5,
  25. ^"Halloween: H20". Amazon. Retrieved October 27,
  26. ^"The Halloween Collection: Halloween Resurrection / Halloween: H2O / Halloween VI: The Curse of Michael Myers", Amazon, September 6, , retrieved March 31,
  27. ^"Halloween Triple Feature Blu-ray". Blu-ray.com. Retrieved October 27,
  28. ^ ab"Halloween H Twenty Years Later Blu-ray". blu-ray.com. Retrieved October 27,
  29. ^"Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers / Halloween: H20 Blu-ray". Blu-ray.com. Retrieved October 27,

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween_H_20_Years_Later
This is a good pageThis page is related to the Halloween series

Halloween: Resurrection

Directed By

Rick Rosenthal

Produced By

Michael Leahy,
Paul Freeman

Written By

Story:
Larry Brand
Screenplay:
Larry Brand
Sean Hood
Characters:
John Carpenter

Cast

Busta Rhymes
Bianca Kajlich
Thomas Ian Nicholas
with Tyra Banks
and Jamie Lee Curtis

Cinematography

David Geddes

Editing By

Robert A. Ferretti

Produced By

Dimension Films,
Nightfall Productions

Distributed By

Dimension Films

Release Date(s)

July 12,

Country

Flag of the United States.pngUnited States

Halloween: Resurrection&#;(previously under working titles of&#;Halloween 8&#;or&#;Halloween: Homecoming) is a American&#;slasher film and the eighth installment in the&#;Halloween&#;film series. Directed by&#;Rick Rosenthal, who had also directed&#;Halloween II&#;in , the film builds upon the continuity of&#;Halloween H 20 Years Later.

Halloween: Resurrection continues with the masked serial killer&#;Michael Myers&#;(Brad Loree) continuing his murderous rampage in his hometown of Haddonfield. Yet, this time, the killer's old, derelict childhood home is being used for a live internet horror show.

Plot[]

Warning: this text contains details about the plot/ending of the film.

Three years after the events of the&#;previous film,&#;Laurie Strode&#;is in a psychiatric facility. Flashbacks reveal that a paramedic had located the body of Myers in the dining hall of Hillcrest Academy; Myers attacked him, and crushed his larynx so he wouldn't cry out, and switched clothing and his mask. It was actually the paramedic that Laurie had beheaded. As Laurie drove the coroner's van out of the school, Myers in the paramedic's clothing walked out of the school grounds and went into hiding.

On October 31, , Laurie, pretending to be heavily medicated, prepares herself for the inevitable confrontation. Michael appears at the hospital and kills two security guards, decapitating one and slitting the throat of the other. Laurie lures Michael into a trap, as she attempts to kill him, Michael feigns confusion and pretends to struggle with his mask. Unable to risk killing another innocent person, Laurie starts to remove his mask to make sure that it is her brother. Myers seizes his chances and breaks free of the trap, then stabs Laurie in the back before she pecked his lips and there sending her off the roof to her death.

The following year, college students Bill Woodlake, Donna Chang, Jen Danzig, Jim Morgan, Rudy Grimes and Sara Moyer win a competition to appear on an Internet reality show directed by Freddie Harris and his friend Nora Winston, in which they have to spend a night in Michael's childhood home in order to figure out what led him to kill. On Halloween, each equipped with head-cameras as well as the cameras throughout the house, they search the house and separate into three groups. Sara's messaging friend Deckard watches the broadcast during a Halloween party. Meanwhile, Michael breaches his home and stabs Bill in the head, and kills a cameraman as well.

Donna and Jim begin getting intimate in the basement and a wall filled with corpses falls on them. Jim realizes the corpses are fake and the show is a setup. Jim leaves, but Donna notices a tunnel behind the fallen wall. Myers chases her through the tunnels before impaling her on a spike on the wall. At the party, Deckard and other partygoers witness the murder. Deckard realizes that the murder was real, but the others believe it is an act. Freddie goes through the house dressed as Michael, but is secretly followed by the real Myers. Freddie, mistaking Michael for Charlie (the cameraman who had been killed earlier), tells him to go to the garage and help Nora out; he goes to the garage and promptly kills Nora.

When Rudy, Sara, and Jim find Freddie in the Myers costume, he reveals the scheme to them and begs them to cooperate, telling them that he's set up a nice payday for all of them. When he leaves, the trio decides to gather up the other three and leave. But before they can, Jen discovers the body of Bill (who was stabbed in the head and vanished earlier) and is decapitated by Myers right in front of Rudy, Sara, and Jim. Rudy and Sara flee, but Jim stays to fend off Myers only to have his head crushed. Myers kills Rudy by pinning him to the door with kitchen knives before chasing Sara upstairs.

Locking herself in a bedroom, Sara begs for Deckard to help her. The other party goers realize that the deaths have not been staged. With Deckard messaging her Myers' location, Sara escapes and is found by Freddie. Myers finds and attacks them. Freddie is injured and Sara makes her way to the tunnels. She finds an exit near Donna's body and emerges in the garage, where Myers finds her and starts an electrical fire in the garage. Freddie returns and begins fighting Myers hand-to-hand. When he is overpowered, Freddie instead electrocutes Myers, tangling him up in electrical wiring before carrying Sara out of the burning garage.

The Myers house burns to the ground. Myers' body and the bodies of his victims are then taken to the morgue. As the medical examiner begins to examine Myers' body, he awakens just as the film ends.

List of Deaths[]

Name Cause of Death Killer On Screen Notes
Franklin Munroe Beheaded with kitchen knife Michael Myers Yes
Willie Haines Throat slit with kitchen knife Michael Myers Yes
Laurie StrodeKnifed in back, pushed off rooftop Michael MyersYes
Charley Albans Throat impaled with tripod leg Michael Myers Yes
Bill Woodlake Knifed in head Michael Myers Yes
Donna Chang Impaled through back by metal spike Michael Myers Yes
Jenna Danzig Beheaded with kitchen knife Michael Myers Yes
Jim Morgan Head crushed Michael Myers Yes
Rudy Grimms Pinned to door with 3 kitchen knives through chest Michael Myers Yes
Nora Winston Knifed in stomach, hung by cable Michael Myers Yes
Nurse Unknown Michael Myers No Debatable

Cast[]

  • Brad Loree&#;as&#;Michael Myers
  • Busta Rhymes&#;as Freddie Harris
  • Bianca Kajlich&#;as Sara Moyer
  • Thomas Ian Nicholas&#;as Bill Woodlake
  • Ryan Merriman&#;as Myles Deckard Barton
  • Daisy McCrackin&#;as Donna Chang
  • Katee Sackhoff&#;as Jennifer 'Jen' Danzig
  • Luke Kirby&#;as Jim Morgan
  • Sean Patrick Thomas&#;as Rudy Grimes
  • Tyra Banks&#;as Nora Winston
  • Jamie Lee Curtis&#;as&#;Laurie Strode
  • Lorena Gale&#;as Nurse Wells
  • Marisa Rudiak&#;as Nurse Phillips
  • Brent Chapman&#;as Franklin Munroe
  • Dan Joffre&#;as Willie Haines
  • Gus Lynch&#;as Harold Trumble
  • Haig Sutherland&#;as Aron
  • Brad Sihvon&#;as Charlie Albans
  • Rick Rosenthal&#;as Professor Mixter

Reception[]

The film came out to widely negative critical reviews, having just a 12% score on&#;Rotten Tomatoes,&#;with many claiming it was an unnecessary sequel to the&#;H20&#;film. Despite the heavy criticism,&#;Resurrection&#;was somewhat of a box office success, with over $30 million made in the box office. Actress&#;Jamie Lee Curtis&#;returned in her long-running role as&#;Laurie Strode; Larry Brand and&#;Sean Hood&#;devised the screenplay.&#;Resurrection&#;is currently the final installment in the original&#;Halloween&#;film series. Although more sequels were planned to follow&#;Resurrection, the series was eventually&#;rebooted&#;with&#;Rob Zombie's&#; remake&#;of the original Halloween, and in a direct sequel to Halloween () was released to positive reviews.

Videos[]

Halloween Resurrection Trailer-0

Halloween Resurrection Trailer-0

Halloween Resurrection - Behind the Scenes Footage

External links[]

Sours: https://horror.fandom.com/wiki/Halloween:_Resurrection
  1. Folding work table costco
  2. 3 4 fridge
  3. Grade 8 module 2a unit 2 lesson 7

Halloween: Resurrection

H8bann.jpg

Halloween: Resurrection is a slasher film in which Michael Myers returns to Haddonfield to deal with the cast and crew of a reality show which is being broadcast from his old home. This movie is a sequel to the film Halloween.

Laurie Strode[edit]

  • You failed, Michael. You want to know why? Because I'm not afraid of you. But what about you? Are you afraid of me? Are you afraid to die, Michael?
  • (after kissing Michael's mask before he sends her falling to her death) I'll see you in Hell.

Dialogue[edit]

Nurse Phillips: Why is this patient in lockdown?
Nurse Wells: They didn't tell you about Laurie Strode?
Nurse Phillips: No.
Nurse Wells: You must have heard of her. Sister of Michael Myers?
Nurse Phillips: Michael Myers, the serial killer?
Nurse Wells: Oh, well, you all hear the gossip soon enough. For now, let's just get
Nurse Phillips: No, no, no, wait. Tell me about her.
Nurse Wells: She decapitated a man.
Nurse Phillips: Oh, my God. Why?
Nurse Wells: Halloween. Three years ago. Twenty years after the first murders, her brother finally found her. Tracked her down at the school where she was working. There were several murders. Lots of confusion.
Nurse Phillips: Oh, my God. She killed the wrong person.
Nurse Wells: Father of three.
Nurse Phillips: Well, why didn't the paramedic say something?
Nurse Wells: His larynx had been crushed. Don't let on, you know.

Cast[edit]

Taglines[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Halloween:_Resurrection

Halloween: Resurrection

Halloween: Resurrection
Halloween Resurrection.jpeg

This is why you don't make a sequel that "resurrects" and negates a fine conclusion with plot holes and Busta Rhymes

Genre: Horror
Slasher
Starring: Jamie Lee Curtis
Busta Rhymes
Bianca Kajlich
Thomas Ian Nicholas
Ryan Merriman
Sean Patrick Thomas
Katee Sackhoff
Photography: Color
Release Date: July 12,
Runtime: 90 minutes
Country: United States
Prequel: Halloween H 20 Years Later
Sequel: Halloween ()


Halloween: Resurrection is the 8th movie in the Halloween franchise, and apart of its H2O timeline; being the sequel to Halloween H2O.

Plot

The original house of horrors, the dilapidated home of infamous serial killer Michael Myers, has now become the set of a webcam reality show. But when the veteran slasher discovers that a group of university students has taken over his old killing grounds, he decides it's time to bring the blades out of retirement.

Why Evil Never Finds It’s Way Home

  1. This movie is unnecessary, as the predecessor, Halloween H20, had a fitting end to the series.
  2. Busta Rhymes was thrown in just so the movie can get a familiar and relevant face, at the time, in there.
  3. The movie humiliates Michael Myers and Laurie Strode in the worst way possible.
    1. Busta Rhymes' character: “Freddie” would always taunt and overpower him in fights with kung-fu, even making Halloween related one liners while he does it.
    2. Laurie Strode gets killed off for making a very stupid decision by trying to reveal Michael Myers’ face, despite that his hands have not been restrained while he’s been hung upside-down. The worst part would be her very little screen-time as stated below.
    3. The scene where Freddie is wearing a Michael Myers costume while the real Michael is walking behind him, causing Freddie to turn around to see him and tells him to go somewhere else and not be Michael Myers: Not only does Michael literally listen to Freddie’s instructions, but he didn’t even go in for the kill. This scene alone just took away Michael’s fear factor and basically turned him into a joke.
  4. Speaking of Laurie Strode’s death: this just makes Michael Myers' motivation to murder completely unnecessary. In the franchise, Michael is known for mainly targeting those who were apart of his bloodline.
    1. Killing off Laurie in such a way was very unnecessary.
  5. Some of the characters are unlikeable.
  6. The movie is responsible for killing the franchise for 5 years.
  7. Awful cinematography and editing that makes it feel more like a direct to video movie than a theatrical film.
  8. Michael Myers' mask is pretty ugly and way too detailed.
  9. Adds in s movie clichés such as found footage tapes. While this is convenient to the plot, this just makes the movie feel predictable.
  10. Michael Myers is pretty weak in the movie, as he gets overpowered by Freddie with kung-fu moves while making stereotypical karate noises. There was literally no statement on how he learned martial arts outside of watching Jackie Chan movies either, so it just feels very unrealistic.
  11. Several unrealistic, cartoony moments, like when Sara screams so loud, she makes glass break.
  12. Misleading poster: On the poster it shows Laurie, as if she's going to be important to the plot, when in reality she only appears in one scene before being killed off.
    • Also in the poster: Laurie has short hair, but in the film: she has long hair.
  13. Some of the dialogue just kills what made the first few Halloween films so terrifying, such as the "Trick or treat, motherfucker!" line.
  14. Ruins the great ending to the franchise of Halloween H2O by having Michael Myers fake his death the whole time and the one Laurie killed being a fake.
  15. Many pointless moments.
  16. It doesn't even feel like a Halloween movie for the most part.

Redeeming Qualities

  1. Despite the poor execution, the premise of the film is actually very interesting on paper.
  2. Jamie Lee Curtis still does a good performance like in the previous movies.
  3. There were at least some decent kills.
  4. There were some funny moments, especially with Busta Rhymes.

Reception

Halloween: Resurrection was released on July 12, in the US to moderate reception which did not change in its later international release. The film peaked at #4 on its opening weekend on US screens raking in $12,, behind Reign of Fire, Road to Perdition and Men in Black II. It grossed $30,, domestically and a further $7,, for a moderate $37,, worldwide gross.

The film received highly unfavorable reviews from several critics. It has garnered a score of 11% on Rotten Tomatoes based on 62 reviews, with the site's consensus being: "The only thing this tired slasher flick may resurrect is nostalgia for when the genre was still fresh and scary." On Metacritic, the film has a score of 19 out of , based on 17 reviews, indicating “overwhelming dislike”. Lou Lumenick of The New York Post said, "It's so devoid of joy and energy it makes even Jason X look positively Shakespearian by comparison." Dave Kehr of The New York Times said, "Spectators will indeed sit open-mouthed before the screen, not screaming but yawning. Peter Travers of Rolling Stone said, "Every sequel you skip will be two hours gained. Consider this review life-affirming." Joe Leydon of Variety said, even more uselessly redundant and shamelessly money-grubbing than most third-rate horror sequels." Glenn Lovell of the San Jose Mercury News was slightly more positive: "No, it's not as single-minded as John Carpenter's original, but it's sure a lot smarter and more unnerving than the sequels.

Trivia

  • The Halloween film ignores the events of this sequel and all of the others.

Loading comments

Sours: https://awfulmovies.miraheze.org/wiki/Halloween:_Resurrection

Resurrection wiki halloween:

Halloween: Resurrection

American film

Halloween: Resurrection is a American slasher film directed by Rick Rosenthal, who had also directed Halloween II in Larry Brand and Sean Hood devised the screenplay. The film is a direct sequel to Halloween H20 and it stars Busta Rhymes, Bianca Kajlich, Thomas Ian Nicholas, Ryan Merriman, Sean Patrick Thomas, Tyra Banks and Jamie Lee Curtis, with Brad Loree as the primary villain Michael Myers. The eighth installment in the Halloween franchise, it follows Michael Myers continuing his murderous rampage in his hometown of Haddonfield, when his old, derelict childhood home is used for a live internet horror show.

Halloween: Resurrection was released on July 12, to largely negative reviews, with many considering it an unnecessary sequel to Halloween H 20 Years Later. The film earned earning $ million at the box office, with a production budget of $15 million. Although another sequel was planned to follow Resurrection, the next film in the franchise became Halloween, a remake directed by Rob Zombie.

Plot[edit]

Following the murders at Hillcrest Academy, a guilt-ridden and traumatized Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) has been confined to a psychiatric facility, after killing a man whom she had mistaken for her murderous brother Michael Myers. As two nurses talk about what happened, flashbacks reveal that a paramedic had found an unconscious Michael in the school, before he suddenly awakened and attacked the paramedic, crushing his larynx so that he could not speak. Michael then swapped clothes with the unconscious paramedic, and left the school grounds and escaped into the woods behind the school, as Laurie drove off in the ambulance she believed Michael was in.

On October 31, , after three years of hiding, Michael re-emerges to attempt to murder Laurie again, who has been institutionalized at the Grace Andersen Sanitarium. Expecting his arrival, Laurie sets up a trap for him. After killing two security guards, Michael attacks and chases Laurie to the institution's rooftop, where her trap works and temporarily incapacitates Michael. However, Laurie's fears of killing the wrong person again get the better of her, and when she tries to remove his mask to confirm his identity, Michael stabs and throws her off the rooftop to her death.

A year later, college students Sara Moyer (Bianca Kajlich), Bill Woodlake (Thomas Ian Nicholas), Donna Chang (Daisy McCrackin), Jen Danzig (Katee Sackhoff), Jim Morgan (Luke Kirby), and Rudy Grimes (Sean Patrick Thomas) win a competition to appear on an Internet reality show called Dangertainment, directed by Freddie Harris (Busta Rhymes) and Nora Winston (Tyra Banks), in which they have to spend a night in Michael's abandoned childhood house in order to figure out what led him to kill. However, while setting up cameras throughout the house in preparation for the show, cameraman Charlie (Brad Sihvon) is killed by Michael, who has returned to Haddonfield. On Halloween night, equipped with head-cameras, Sara, Bill, Donna, Jen, Jim, and Rudy enter the house and separate into three groups to search for clues, while Sara's messaging friend Deckard watches the live broadcast during a party. During the search, Michael suddenly appears and kills Bill.

Donna and Jim discover a wall filled with fake corpses and realize that the show is a setup, before the former is killed by Michael. At the party, Deckard and other partygoers witness the murder, but only Deckard realizes that it was real. Meanwhile, Freddie enters the house dressed as Michael in order to scare the competitors, and is followed by the real Michael, whom he mistakes for Charlie. When Rudy, Sara, and Jim find Freddie in the Michael costume, he reveals the scheme to them and begs them to cooperate, telling them that they will all be paid well if the show works out. After Freddie leaves, the trio decides to gather up the rest of their friends and leave. Jen discovers Bill's corpse, and Michael decapitates her, in front of Rudy, Sara, and Jim, who soon realize that it isn't Freddie. Michael proceeds to kill Jim and Rudy before chasing Sara upstairs.

Locking herself in a bedroom, Sara begs for Deckard to help her. As the other party goers realize that all the murders were real, Deckard begins to message Sara on Michael's locations to help her avoid him. Sara runs into Freddie just as Michael finds them and stabs the latter. Sara runs into the tunnels and finds an exit leading to the garage, where she discovers Nora's body. Michael again arrives and attacks Sara, but a still-living Freddie finds them and fights Michael as an electrical fire starts in the garage. After electrocuting Michael, Freddie carries Sara to safety, leaving Michael to die in the burning garage. Later, Freddie and Sara are interviewed by the local news, during which Sara thanks Deckard for saving her life. Meanwhile, Michael is presumed dead and his body is taken to the morgue; however, as the coroner prepares to examine his body, Michael suddenly awakens.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The writers of Halloween H 20 Years Later were left with a dilemma when Jamie Lee Curtis wanted to end the series, but Moustapha Akkad had a clause that legally wouldn't allow the writers to kill Michael Myers off. According to the Blu-ray released by Scream Factory, Curtis almost left the project just weeks before filming, until Kevin Williamson came up with the paramedic storyline and presented it to Akkad. Curtis finally agreed to be a part of the film under the condition that no footage hinting toward a sequel would be presented by the film, and that the audience would believe that Michael was dead until the inevitable sequel was announced. Resurrection's first shot of Michael in the paramedic uniform was filmed the day after H20's principal photography ended, according to H20's editor, Patrick Lussier.[2]

Both Whitney Ransick and Dwight H. Little were approached to direct the film but turned it down. Later Rick Rosenthal, the director of Halloween II, was chosen to direct. During the casting period of the film, producers considered Danielle Harris (who played Jamie Lloyd in Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers and Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers) for a role in the film. In post-production, Bianca Kajlich's screams had to be dubbed because of her inability to scream. The film's trailer was delivered on April 26, , with the release of Jason X. Principal photography began in Vancouver, British Columbia on May 14, with the opening scene filmed at Riverview Hospital in Coquitlam, BC.[3]

Originally known as Halloween: Homecoming, Halloween H2K, and Halloween: MichaelMyers.com before the producers chose the final title as they wanted one that let audiences know Michael Myers was alive. [4]

Music[edit]

For this eighth installment of the series, Danny Lux created a genuine score relying upon the original instead of generating something new. He approaches the score with an electro-acoustic feel that dates back to the synthesizer scores of the '80s.[5] The film also features several rap and hip-hop songs.[6]

In direct contrast to general critical reviews of the film, some assessments of its sound and theme music have been praising. For example, critic Steve Newton complimented the film's "creepy" and "unsettling" revival of the original iconic theme, while criticising the film itself, as well as the rap tracks included.[6]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Halloween: Resurrection was released on July 12, in the US to moderate reception which did not change in its later international release. The film peaked at #4 on its opening weekend on US screens raking in $12,, behind Reign of Fire, Road to Perdition and Men in Black II. It grossed $30,, domestically and a further $7,, for a $37,, worldwide gross.[7]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes the film has an approval rating of 12% based on 67 reviews, with the site's consensus being: "The only thing this tired slasher flick may resurrect is nostalgia for when the genre was still fresh and scary."[8] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 19 out of , based on 17 reviews, indicating "overwhelming dislike".[9] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B+" on an A+ to F scale.[10]

Lou Lumenick of the New York Post said, "It's so devoid of joy and energy it makes even Jason X look positively Shakespearian by comparison."[11] Dave Kehr of The New York Times said, "Spectators will indeed sit open-mouthed before the screen, not screaming but yawning."[12]Peter Travers of Rolling Stone said, "Every sequel you skip will be two hours gained. Consider this review life-affirming."[13] Joe Leydon of Variety said, "[Seems] even more uselessly redundant and shamelessly money-grubbing than most third-rate horror sequels."[14] Glenn Lovell of the San Jose Mercury News gave a positive review: "No, it's not as single-minded as John Carpenter's original, but it's sure a lot smarter and more unnerving than the sequels."[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc"The Numbers Halloween Resurrection". The Numbers. Retrieved March 25,
  2. ^Wallace, Amy (August 4, ). "Horror Comes Full Circle in 'H20'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 5,
  3. ^"Halloween Resurrection Behind The Scenes". HalloweenMovies. Archived from the original on January 24, Retrieved December 6,
  4. ^"Halloween: Resurrection () - IMDb".
  5. ^Halloween: Resurrection Music Review at Music from the MoviesArchived at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ abNewton, Steve (February 8, ). "Horror Review: Halloween–Resurrection". earofnewt.com. The Georgia Straight (published July 18, ). Retrieved December 6,
  7. ^Halloween: at Box Office Mojo
  8. ^"Halloween: Resurrection". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved October 21,
  9. ^"Halloween: Resurrection Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 6,
  10. ^"HALLOWEEN: RESURRECTION () B+". CinemaScore. Archived from the original on December 20,
  11. ^Lumenick, Lou (July 13, ). "NO TREAT". New York Post.
  12. ^Halloween: Resurrection Movie Review at New York Times
  13. ^Travers, Peter (July 8, ). "Halloween: Resurrection". Rolling Stone.
  14. ^Leydon, Joe (July 14, ). "Halloween: Resurrection". Variety.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween:_Resurrection
Halloween: Resurrection (5/10) Movie CLIP - Imposter (2002) HD

You, too, deserve satisfaction, and of course, the right to lie in the hospital. With these words, the sister got cancer on the same couch, but warned at once: - Just fuck faster, my husband will come soon. Completely stunned, Kusachkin put his spear to her hole and briskly entered.

You will also like:

I want more, - said Inna. - What does my girl want. - Ruslan whispered, bending over to her ear. - I want everything, - said Inna and rolled over onto her stomach. Ruslan started massaging her shoulders.



1566 1567 1568 1569 1570