Handwork designs for embroidery

Handwork designs for embroidery DEFAULT

Zopdeal India Embroidery Export

Hand Embroidery Services

Our range of products include Beautifull Hand Work Designs, Hand Work Embroidery Service, Unique Hand Embroidery Service, Exclusive Hand Work Design, Beautiful Sequence Embroidery Work and Exclusive Designer Hand Work.

Beautifull Hand Work Designs
Interested in this product?
FabricAvailable In Silk, Net and Velvet
PatternEmbroidered
SizeAvailable In S, M, L, XL, XXL
Wash CareDry Clean
Wear TypeWedding Wear

Zopdeal Hand Embroidery is Pune based company that has been delighting the global buyers with its breathtakin embroidery services. The company serves as a pioneering manufacturer, exporter, and supplier of premium quality designer  zardozi embroidery services, handmade zardozi embroidery services, net zardozi embroidery services, beaded embroidery services, lehenga choli embroidery services, and fancy embroidery services. The company has a strong presence in the national as well as international markets. We are able to achieve a prestigious position in the market owing to our exquisite products and unparalleled services.

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Hand Work Embroidery Service
Interested in this product?
Service TypeHand Work Embroidery
Service ModeOffline
FeaturesCost Effective
Service LocationOn Site

Established in the year  at Pune, Maharashtra, we “Zopdeal India Embroidery Export” are a Proprietorship based firm, engaged as the foremost Manufacturer of Bridal Lehenga Choli, Designer Lehenga Choli,Luxury Dress etc. Our products are high in demand due to their premium quality  and affordable prices. Furthermore, we ensure to timely deliver these products to our clients, through this we have gained a huge clients base in the market.Apart from this we also provide Hand Embroidery Services.

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Unique Hand Embroidery Service
Interested in this product?
OccasionWedding Wear
FabricSilk
SizeAvailable In S,M,L,XL,XXL
Wash CareDry Clean
Set ContentBlouse,Dupatta and Lehenga

Price Range:Rs per feet

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Exclusive Hand Work Design
Interested in this product?
Fabricnet
PatternEmbroidered
SizeAvailable In S, M, L, XL, XXL
Wash CareDry clean
Wear TypeWedding Wear

Zopdeal Hand Embroidery is Pune based company that has been delighting the global buyers with its breathtakin embroidery services. The company serves as a pioneering manufacturer, exporter, and supplier of premium quality designer  zardozi embroidery services, handmade zardozi embroidery services, net zardozi embroidery services, beaded embroidery services, lehenga choli embroidery services, and fancy embroidery services. The company has a strong presence in the national as well as international markets. We are able to achieve a prestigious position in the market owing to our exquisite products and unparalleled services.

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Beautiful Sequence Embroidery Work
Interested in this product?
Fabricnet,silk,velvet
PatternEmbroidered
SizeAvailable In S, M, L, XL, XXL
Wash CareDry clean
Wear TypeWedding Wear

Zopdeal Hand Embroidery is Pune based company that has been delighting the global buyers with its breathtakin embroidery services. The company serves as a pioneering manufacturer, exporter, and supplier of premium quality designer  zardozi embroidery services, handmade zardozi embroidery services, net zardozi embroidery services, beaded embroidery services, lehenga choli embroidery services, and fancy embroidery services. The company has a strong presence in the national as well as international markets. We are able to achieve a prestigious position in the market owing to our exquisite products and unparalleled services.

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Exclusive Designer Hand Work
Interested in this product?
OccasionParty Wear
Fabricnet
SizeAvailable In S, M, L, XL, XXL
Wash CareDry Clean

Zopdeal Hand Embroidery is Pune based company that has been delighting the global buyers with its breathtakin embroidery services. The company serves as a pioneering manufacturer, exporter, and supplier of premium quality designer  zardozi embroidery services, handmade zardozi embroidery services, net zardozi embroidery services, beaded embroidery services, lehenga choli embroidery services, and fancy embroidery services. The company has a strong presence in the national as well as international markets. We are able to achieve a prestigious position in the market owing to our exquisite products and unparalleled services.

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Beautiful Handwork Sequence Work
Interested in this product?
ColorPink
Set ContentHand work on lace fabric
FabricNet, Silk
SizeAvailable In S, M, L, XL, XXL
Wash CareDry clean
Wear TypeWedding Wear

Price Range:Rs To /Set.

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Beautiful Hand Embroidery Designs
Interested in this product?
ColorRed
FabricGeorgette
PatternEmbroidered
SizeAll Sizes
Wash CareDry Clean
Wear TypeWedding Wear

Zopdeal Hand Embroidery is Pune based company that has been delighting the global buyers with its breathtakin embroidery services. The company serves as a pioneering manufacturer, exporter, and supplier of premium quality designer  zardozi embroidery services, handmade zardozi embroidery services, net zardozi embroidery services, beaded embroidery services, lehenga choli embroidery services, and fancy embroidery services. The company has a strong presence in the national as well as international markets. We are able to achieve a prestigious position in the market owing to our exquisite products and unparalleled services.

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Sours: https://www.indiamart.com/zopdeal-india-embroidery-export/hand-embroidery-services.html

Handwork Embroideries

Types of Embroideries:

Zardosi Work:

This pattern is performed with needle and Aari-Hook, using golden, silver and multicolored metal threads on fabric to give the appearance of true embroidery. It is the Queen of all handworks on Garments, originally created for Royal families. In modern times, it is the first choice for Richness and Glitter. For Bridal Wears, this is among the first choices.

Mukesh Work:

It is different type of Handwork, neither using threads, nor needle. Only by use of flat metal wire (called Mukeish/Badla) on Sarees, likes the twinkling stars in a clear sky.  
Generally the work is done in the form of small dots, but to give a fancy & rich look sometimes other techniques are also employed, giving shapes of flowers & leafs etc. Most popular is the silver work, but now-a-days antique, copper & other colored Mukaish is also in trend.

Gota – Patti Work:

This is centuries old typical traditional work from Rajasthan and named after the capital JAIPUR.      
‘GOTA’ is a kind of ribbon, woven on hand-looms, using mainly very fine flat metal instead of yarn. In Real Gota, Silver & Gold metals are used. But in routine, the base metal is copper, coated by Silver etc.              
In latest developments the copper has been replaced by Polyester film; it has good resistance to moisture & does not tarnish as compared to metal-based ‘GOTA’. ‘GOTA’ is available in different width. And with help of materials like Dori, Sitara, Kundan etc., artistic works are created by artisans.   
There is no better choice than ‘Gota Work’ when Rich & Heavy look is desired in Light weight.

Paarsi work:

This Hand-Embroidery originates from the Persian people. Rich and colorful work in silky threads is the result of this detailed work. It is a very fine & time taking Handwork. Hence, a bit costlier.
The Paarsi work mainly incorporates two types of designs, one is rich in flowers and other highlights the figures of Birds etc.

Kashmiri Work:

Kashmiri work has a rich color spectrum and exquisite workmanship with beautifully composed designs depicting common local symbols like the chinar leaf, the grape, the cherry, plum, apple blossom, lily, the saffron flower and various birds of the region.

Phulkari  Work:

The Punjab-Haryana specialty called the Phulkari (flowered work), is traditionally worked on coarse cotton in red or blue or flossed silk. One can find the scenes from Krishna leela and other religious subjects, depicted in the dark silk embroidered 'rumals' of Chamba.

Kasuti Work:

Karnataka's Kasuti is famous for sketching of religious themes. They make use of backstitch, the running stitch, the cross-stitch and the zigzag running stitch on hand woven cloth, using brighter colors like red, purple, green and orange.

Chikan Work:

The practice of the famous Chikan work is now centered at Lucknow (U.P.) and Gaya (Bihar) This Chikan work dates back its origin to the royal courts of Oudh. This is done with white cotton on a fine white muslin base using a variety of stitches minutely worked together with knotted stitches resulting in designs with raised surfaces. The creation of 'jali' or the net effect is one of its specialties.

Kantha Embroidery:

The 'Kantha' Embroidery of Bengal makes imaginative use of waste rugs, which are sewn on a base with simple running stitches to form motifs.

Tribal embroidery:

The tribal embroidery is a class by itself with a wide range and varied style and composition. It generally features bright colors and simple motifs. They are often free hand, with no signs of being marked, or necessarily symmetrical. They are usually done with colored thread, and the types of stitches, subject matter, and layout define the tribes who produced them. Among the most colorful works is the work of the Lambadi and Banjara tribes. The Nilgiris' 'Toda embroidery' is also distinctive.

Shisha Embroidery:

A tribal technique, Shisha mirror embroidery is the process of attaching tiny mirrors to a textile, usually in combination with other types of tribal stitches.

Bandhani: Bandhani is traditional art-work created with a concept of Tie-Dye.

Kundan Work: Kundan are Indian gem stones which are placed on the sarees to give a jewelry effect.

Chikankari: Chikankari work is fine white cotton thread embroidery which is usually created in paisley or floral patterns.

Pitha Work: Pitha work is a traditional handcraft with golden or silver threads that are pressured to give an ethnic look to sarees.

Resham work: Resham work is where silk threads are used to hand-embroider various designs and motifs.

Sequins Work: Sequins are disk-shaped beads used for decorative purposes. They are available in a wide variety of colors and geometrical shapes.

Bead Work: Bead work is a small, decorative object that is usually pierced for threading or stringing.

Applique work : the art of embellishing a fabric or article of clothing with other pieces of fabric sewn on with concealed or decorative stitches or glued also used to create designs with braid, ribbons and other trimmings.

 

Sours: https://www.siricollections.in/
  1. Best fortnite seasons ranked
  2. Ad park animal clinic
  3. Ganley toyota used cars
  4. Optical bluetooth transmitter
  5. Refillable lighters near me

Embroidery

Art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn

This article is about handcraft. For Bradbury's short story, see Embroidery (short story).

Embroidery is the craft of decorating fabric or other materials using a needle to apply thread or yarn. Embroidery may also incorporate other materials such as pearls, beads, quills, and sequins. In modern days, embroidery is usually seen on caps, hats, coats, overlays, blankets, dress shirts, denim, dresses, stockings, and golf shirts. Embroidery is available with a wide variety of thread or yarn colour.

Some of the basic techniques or stitches of the earliest embroidery are chain stitch, buttonhole or blanket stitch, running stitch, satin stitch, cross stitch.[1] Those stitches remain the fundamental techniques of hand embroidery today.

History[edit]

Detail of embroidered silkgauze ritual garment. Rows of even, round chain stitchused for outline and color. 4th century BC, Zhoutomb at Mashan, Hubei, China.

Origins[edit]

The process used to tailor, patch, mend and reinforce cloth fostered the development of sewing techniques, and the decorative possibilities of sewing led to the art of embroidery. Indeed, the remarkable stability of basic embroidery stitches has been noted:

It is a striking fact that in the development of embroidery there are no changes of materials or techniques which can be felt or interpreted as advances from a primitive to a later, more refined stage. On the other hand, we often find in early works a technical accomplishment and high standard of craftsmanship rarely attained in later times.[3]

The art of embroidery has been found worldwide and several early examples have been found. Works in China have been dated to the Warring States period (5th–3rd century BC). In a garment from Migration period Sweden, roughly – AD, the edges of bands of trimming are reinforced with running stitch

, back stitch, stem stitch, tailor's buttonhole stitch, and Whip stitch, but it is uncertain whether this work simply reinforced the seams or should be interpreted as decorative embroidery.[5]

Historical applications and techniques[edit]

A pair of Chinese shoes for bound 'lily' feet

Depending on time, location and materials available, embroidery could be the domain of a few experts or a widespread, popular technique. This flexibility led to a variety of works, from the royal to the mundane.

Elaborately embroidered clothing, religious objects, and household items often were seen as a mark of wealth and status, as in the case of Opus Anglicanum, a technique used by professional workshops and guilds in medieval England. In 18th-century England and its colonies, samplers employing fine silks were produced by the daughters of wealthy families. Embroidery was a skill marking a girl's path into womanhood as well as conveying rank and social standing.[7]

Conversely, embroidery is also a Folk art, using materials that were accessible to nonprofessionals. Examples include Hardanger from Norway, Merezhka from Ukraine, Mountmellick embroidery from Ireland, Nakshi kantha from Bangladesh and West Bengal, and Brazilian embroidery. Many techniques had a practical use such as Sashiko from Japan, which was used as a way to reinforce clothing.[8][9]

While historically viewed as a pastime, activity, or hobby, intended just for women, embroidery has often been used as a form of biography. Women who were unable to access a formal education or, at times, writing implements, were often taught embroidery and utilized it as a means of documenting their lives.[10] In terms of documenting the histories of marginalized groups, especially women of color both within the United States and around the world, embroidery is a means of studying the every day lives of those whose lives largely went unstudied throughout much of history.[11]

Embroidered book[edit]

Before the printing press book covers were often embroidered. Examples surviving from the Elizabethan era include embroidery worked by Elizabeth I herself before ascending the throne.[12]

The Islamic world[edit]

Further information: Islamic embroidery

Embroidery was an important art in the Medieval Islamic world. The 17th-century Turkish traveler Evliya Çelebi called it the "craft of the two hands". Because embroidery was a sign of high social status in Muslim societies, it became widely popular. In cities such as Damascus, Cairo and Istanbul, embroidery was visible on handkerchiefs, uniforms, flags, calligraphy, shoes, robes, tunics, horse trappings, slippers, sheaths, pouches, covers, and even on leatherbelts. Craftsmen embroidered items with gold and silver thread. Embroidery cottage industries, some employing over people, grew to supply these items.[13]

In the 16th century, in the reign of the Mughal EmperorAkbar, his chronicler Abu al-Fazl ibn Mubarak wrote in the famous Ain-i-Akbari: "His majesty (Akbar) pays much attention to various stuffs; hence Irani, Ottoman, and Mongolian articles of wear are in much abundance especially textiles embroidered in the patterns of Nakshi, Saadi, Chikhan, Ari, Zardozi, Wastli, Gota and Kohra. The imperial workshops in the towns of Lahore, Agra, Fatehpur and Ahmedabad turn out many masterpieces of workmanship in fabrics, and the figures and patterns, knots and variety of fashions which now prevail astonish even the most experienced travelers. Taste for fine material has since become general, and the drapery of embroidered fabrics used at feasts surpasses every description."[14]

Classification[edit]

Embroidery can be classified according to what degree the design takes into account the nature of the base material and by the relationship of stitch placement to the fabric. The main categories are free or Surface embroidery, counted embroidery, and needlepoint or canvas work.[15]

In free or surface embroidery, designs are applied without regard to the weave of the underlying fabric. Examples include crewel and traditional Chinese and Japanese embroidery.

Counted-thread embroiderypatterns are created by making stitches over a predetermined number of threads in the foundation fabric. Counted-thread embroidery is more easily worked on an even-weave foundation fabric such as embroidery canvas, aida cloth, or specially woven cotton and linen fabrics. Examples include cross-stitch and some forms of blackwork embroidery.

While similar to counted thread in regards to technique, in canvas work or needlepoint, threads are stitched through a fabric mesh to create a dense pattern that completely covers the foundation fabric. Examples of canvas work include bargello and Berlin wool work.

Embroidery can also be classified by the similarity of appearance. In drawn thread work and cutwork, the foundation fabric is deformed or cut away to create holes that are then embellished with embroidery, often with thread in the same color as the foundation fabric. When created with white thread on white linen or cotton, this work is collectively referred to as whitework. However, whitework can either be counted or free. Hardanger embroidery is a counted embroidery and the designs are often geometric.[18] Conversely, styles such as Broderie anglaise are similar to free embroidery, with floral or Abstract art that are not dependent on the weave of the fabric.[19]

Tea-cloth, Hungary, midth century

Traditional hand embroidery around the world[edit]

This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by adding missing items with reliable sources.

Traditional embroidery Origin Stitches used materials Picture
Aari embroidery India Chain stitch Aari needle, beads etc
Assisi embroidery Italy Cross stitch, back stitch red thread, silk, stranded perlé cotton
AssisiBorder.JPG
Brazilian embroidery Brazil bullion knots, French knots, cast-on stitch, drizzle stitch,stem stitch, fly stitch, feather stitch Rayon thread
Bulgarian embroidery Bulgaria straight stitch, cross stitch, loop stitch, two-faced stitch Wool thread, silk thread, golden thread Teteven-History-museum-embroideryjpg
Chikankari embroidery Uttarakhand, India Turpai, Darzdari, Pechani, Bijli, Ghaspatti, Makra, Kauri, Hathkadi, Banjkali, Sazi, Karan, Kapkapi, Madrazi, Bulbul-chasm, Taj Mahal, Janjeera, Kangan, Dhania-patti, Rozan, Meharki, Chanapatti, Baalda, Jora, Keel kangan, Bulbul, Sidhaul, Ghas ki patti, Zanzeera, Rahet, Banarsi, Khatau, Phanda, Murri, Chikankari-Tepchi, Bakhiya, Hool, Jali stitch white thread
Kasuthi embroidery Karnataka,India Gavanthi (double running stitch), Muragi (zigzag running stitch), Negi (running stitch), Menthi (cross stitch) cotton thread Motifs of kasuti embroidery
Phulkari Punjab regionPhulkari embroidery, popular since at least the 15th century, is traditionally done on hand-spun cotton cloth with simple darning stitches using silk floss. Patiala Phulkari.jpg

Materials[edit]

A needle is the main stitching tool in embroidery, and comes in various sizes and types.[20] The fabrics and yarns used in traditional embroidery vary from place to place. Wool, linen, and silk have been in use for thousands of years for both fabric and yarn. Today, embroidery thread is manufactured in cotton, rayon, and novelty yarns as well as in traditional wool, linen, and silk. Ribbon embroidery uses narrow ribbon in silk or silk/organza blend ribbon, most commonly to create floral motifs.

Surface embroidery techniques such as chain stitch and couching or laid-work are the most economical of expensive yarns; couching is generally used for goldwork. Canvas work techniques, in which large amounts of yarn are buried on the back of the work, use more materials but provide a sturdier and more substantial finished textile.

In both canvas work and surface embroidery an embroidery hoop or frame can be used to stretch the material and ensure even stitching tension that prevents pattern distortion.[23] Modern canvas work tends to follow symmetrical counted stitching patterns with designs emerging from the repetition of one or just a few similar stitches in a variety of hues. In contrast, many forms of surface embroidery make use of a wide range of stitching patterns in a single piece of work.

Machine embroidery[edit]

Commercial machine embroidery in chain stitchon a voilecurtain, China, early 21st century.

The development of machine embroidery and its mass production came about in stages during the Industrial Revolution. The first embroidery machine was the hand embroidery machine, invented in France in by Josué Heilmann.[25] The next evolutionary step was the schiffli embroidery machine. The latter borrowed from the sewing machine and the Jacquard loom to fully automate its operation. The manufacture of machine-made embroideries in St. Gallen in eastern Switzerland flourished in the latter half of the 19th century.[26] Both St. Gallen, Switzerland and Plauen, Germany were important centers for machine embroidery and embroidery machine development. Many Swiss and Germans immigrated to Hudson county, New Jersey in the early twentieth century and developed a machine embroidery industry there. Shiffli machines have continued to evolve and are still used for industrial scale embroidery.[27]

Contemporary embroidery is stitched with a computerized embroidery machine using patterns digitized with embroidery software. In machine embroidery, different types of "fills" add texture and design to the finished work. Machine embroidery is used to add logos and monograms to business shirts or jackets, gifts, and team apparel as well as to decorate household linens, draperies, and decorator fabrics that mimic the elaborate hand embroidery of the past.

Machine embroidery is most typically done with rayon thread, although polyester thread can also be used. Cotton thread, on the other hand, is prone to breaking and should be avoided if under 30 wt.[28]

There has also been a development in free hand machine embroidery, new machines have been designed that allow for the user to create free-motion embroidery which has its place in textile arts, quilting, dressmaking, home furnishings and more. Users can use the embroidery software to digitize the digital embroidery designs. These digitized design are then transferred to the embroidery machine with the help of a flash drive and then the embroidery machine embroiders the selected design onto the fabric.

Resurgence of hand embroidery[edit]

Japanese free embroidery in silk and metal threads, contemporary.

Since the late s, there has been an exponential growth in the popularity of embroidering by hand. As a result of visual media such as Pinterest and Instagram, artists are able to share their work more extensively, which has inspired younger generations to pick up needle and threads.

Contemporary embroidery artists believe hand embroidery has grown in popularity as a result of an increasing need for relaxation and digitally disconnecting practices.[29]

Modern hand embroidery, as opposed to cross-stitching, is characterized by a more "liberal" approach, where stitches are more freely combined in unconventional ways to create various textures and designs.

In literature[edit]

In Greek mythology the goddess Athena is said to have passed down the art of embroidery (along with weaving) to humans, leading to the famed competition between herself and the mortal Arachne.[30]

Qualifications[edit]

City and Guilds qualification[31] in embroidery allows embroiderers to become recognized for their skill. This qualification also gives them the credibility to teach. For example, the notable textiles artist, Kathleen Laurel Sage,[32] began her teaching career by getting the City and Guilds Embroidery 1 and 2 qualifications. She has now gone on to write a book on the subject.[33]

Gallery[edit]

  • Traditional embroidery in chain stitch on a Kazakh rug, contemporary.

  • Englishcope, late 15th or early 16th century. Silk velvet embroidered with silk and gold threads, closely laid and couched. Contemporary Art Institute of Chicago textile collection.

  • Traditional Turkish embroidery. Izmir Ethnography Museum, Turkey.

  • Traditional Croatian embroidery.

  • Brightly coloured Korean embroidery.

  • Uzbekistan embroidery on a traditional women's parandja robe.

  • Woman wearing a traditional embroidered Kalash headdress, Pakistan.

  • Bookmark of black fabric with multicolored Bedouin embroidery and tassel of embroidery floss

  • Chain-stitch embroidery from England circa

  • Traditional Bulgarian Floral embrodery from Sofia and Trun.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^"Top 12 Basic Hand Embroidery Stitches". Sarah's Hand Embroidery Tutorials. Retrieved
  2. ^Marie Schuette and Sigrid Muller-Christensen, The Art of Embroidery translated by Donald King, Thames and Hudson, , quoted in Netherton & Owen-Crocker , p.&#;2.
  3. ^Coatsworth, Elizabeth: "Stitches in Time: Establishing a History of Anglo-Saxon Embroidery", in Netherton & Owen-Crocker , p.&#;2.
  4. ^Power, Lisa (27 March ). "NGV embroidery exhibition: imagine a year-old spending two years on this"The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 30 May
  5. ^"Handa City Sashiko Program at the Society for Contemporary Craft". Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania. 7 Oct Archived from the original on 5 July Retrieved 25 January
  6. ^Siddle, Kat. "Sashiko". Seamwork Magazine. Colette Media, LLC. Retrieved
  7. ^Murphy, A. Mary (July ). "The Theory and Practice of Counting Stitches as Stories: Material Evidences of Autobiography in Needlework". Women's Studies. 32: &#; via EBSCOhost.
  8. ^van der Merwe, Ria (November ). "From a silent past to a spoken future. Black women's voices in the archival process". Archives and Records. 40: –
  9. ^Church, Ella Rodman (). Artistic Embroidery: Containing Practical Instructions in the Ornamental Branches of Needlework. p.&#;
  10. ^Stone, Caroline (May–June ). "The Skill of the Two Hands". Saudi Aramco World. Vol.&#;58 no.&#;3.
  11. ^Werner, Louis (July–August ). "Mughal Maal". Saudi Aramco World. Vol.&#;62 no.&#;4. Archived from the original on Retrieved
  12. ^Corbet, Mary (October 3, ). "Needlework Terminology: Surface Embroidery". Retrieved November 1,
  13. ^Yvette Stanton. Early Style Hardanger. Vetty Creations. ISBN&#;.
  14. ^Catherine Amoroso Leslie (1 January ). Needlework Through History: An Encyclopedia. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp.&#;34, , ISBN&#;. Retrieved 13 September
  15. ^"Needles". Sarah's Hand Embroidery Tutorials. Retrieved
  16. ^"Materials Required for Hand Embroidery". Sarah's Hand Embroidery Tutorials. Retrieved
  17. ^Willem. "Hand Embroidery Machine". trc-leiden.nl. Retrieved
  18. ^Röllin, Peter. Stickerei-Zeit, Kultur und Kunst in St. Gallen –. VGS Verlagsgemeinschaft, St. Gallen , ISBN&#; (in German)
  19. ^Schneider, Coleman (). Machine Made Embroideries. Globe Lithographing Company.
  20. ^"Choosing Machine-Embroidery Threads". Threads Magazine. The Taunton Press, Inc. Retrieved
  21. ^Elin (). "History of embroidery and its rise in popularity". Charles and Elin. Retrieved
  22. ^Synge, Lanto (). Art of Embroidery: History of Style and Technique. Woodbridge, England: Antique Collectors' Club. p.&#; ISBN&#;.
  23. ^"Creative". City & Guilds.
  24. ^"A Little About Me". Kathleen Laurel Sage.
  25. ^The Zen Cart® Team; et&#;al. "Embroidered Soldered and Heat Zapped Surfaces by Kathleen Laurel Sage".

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gillow, John; Sentance, Bryan (). World Textiles. Bulfinch Press/Little, Brown. ISBN&#;.
  • Levey, S. M.; King, D. (). The Victoria and Albert Museum's Textile Collection Vol. 3: Embroidery in Britain from to . Victoria and Albert Museum. ISBN&#;.
  • Netherton, Robin; Owen-Crocker, Gale R., eds. (). Medieval Clothing and Textiles, Volume 1. Boydell Press. ISBN&#;.
  • Readers Digest (). Complete Guide to Needlework. Readers Digest. ISBN&#;.
  • van Niekerk, Di (). A Perfect World in Ribbon Embroidery and Stumpwork. ISBN&#;.

Further reading[edit]

  • Berman, Pat (). "Berlin Work". American Needlepoint Guild. Retrieved
  • Caulfeild, S.F.A.; B.C. Saward (). The Dictionary of Needlework.
  • Crummy, Andrew (). The Prestonpans Tapestry . Burke's Peerage & Gentry, for Battle of Prestonpans () Heritage Trust.
  • Embroiderers' Guild Practical Study Group (). Needlework School. QED Publishers. ISBN&#;.
  • Koll, Juby Aleyas (). Sarah's Hand Embroidery Tutorials.
  • Lemon, Jane (). Metal Thread Embroidery. Sterling. ISBN&#;.
  • Vogelsang, Gillian; Vogelsang, Willem, eds. (). TRC Needles. The TRC Digital Encyclopaedia of Decorative Needlework. Leiden, The Netherlands: Textile Research Centre.
  • Wilson, David M. (). The Bayeux Tapestry. Thames and Hudson. ISBN&#;.

External links[edit]

Look up embroider in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embroidery

Flirt as much as you like, but offer sex yourself. I got used to it being a man's privilege. - What do you think, when you flirt, this is not an offer to have sex.

Embroidery handwork designs for

Besides, she was still short and I could see her hips and ass in tight jeans. - Wow wow mom, this t-shirt is perfect for you. - Whoa whoa, boy, she's too small for me, I can't go anywhere in her. - Yes, right now, so all the bodies. the girls are dressing.

Latest Designing and Embroidery Work in Handwork Ladies Suits

Katya rose slowly to her feet, her cheeks puffed out, and semen was dripping from the tips of her lips. She spat cum into the sink. Mark poured the brandy and she rinsed it out in her mouth. - Sorry.

Now discussing:

Sparkles. Teeth. With eyes.



153 154 155 156 157