Cummins service manual pdf

Cummins service manual pdf DEFAULT

Cummins-K19-4021499-Service Manual.pdf

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Service Manual (4021499) K19

Bulletin Number 4021499 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Foreword This manual contains instructions for troubleshooting and repairing this engine in the chassis, complete rebuild procedures and specifications. Disassembly, cleaning, inspection, and assembly instructions are included. A listing of accessory and component suppliers is located in Section M - Component Manufacturers. Suppliers can be contacted directly for any information not covered in this manual. Read and follow all safety instructions. Refer to the WARNING in the General Safety Instructions in Section i - Introduction. The manual is organized to guide a service technician through the logical steps of identifying and correcting problems related to the engine. This manual does not cover vehicle or equipment problems. Consult the vehicle or equipment manufacturer for repair procedures. The repair procedures in this manual are based on the engine or component removed from chassis. Some rebuild procedures require the use of special service tools. Make sure the correct tools are used as described in the procedures. When a specific brand name, number, or special tool is referenced in this manual, an equivalent product can be used in place of the recommended item. A series of specific service manuals (for example: Troubleshooting and Repair, Specifications, and Alternative Repair) are available and can be ordered by Contacting your local area Cummins Regional office. A Cummins Regional office listing is located in Service Literature (Section L). Cummins Inc. encourages the user of this manual to report errors, omissions, and recommendations for improvement. Please use the postage paid, pre-addressed Literature Survey Form in the back of this manual for communicating your comments. The specifications and rebuild information in this manual is based on the information in effect at the time of printing. Cummins Inc. reserves the right to make any changes at any time without obligation. If differences are found between your engine and the information in this manual, contact a Cummins Authorized Repair Location or call 1-800-DIESELS (1-800343-7357) toll free in the U.S. and Canada. The latest technology and the highest quality components are used to manufacture Cummins engines. When replacement parts are needed, we recommend using only genuine Cummins or ReCon® exchange parts. Last Modified: 22-May-2006 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-002 About the Manual

General Information This Service Manual is intended to aid in determining the cause of engine related problems and to provide recommended repair procedures. Additionally the manual is intended to aid mechanics in disassembly, inspecting parts for reuse, rebuilding and assembly of components. The manual is divided into sections. Each section is equivalent to a group used in Cummins' filmcard system. Some sections contain reference numbers and procedure numbers. Reference numbers provide general information, specifications, diagrams, and service tools where applicable. Procedure numbers are used to identify and reference specific repair procedures for correcting the problem and describe specific rebuild procedures. This manual does not contain fuel systems electronic troubleshooting. Use the troubleshooting trees in this manual, if there are no electronic fault codes. This manual is designed so the troubleshooting trees are used to locate the cause of an engine problem. The troubleshooting trees then direct the user to the correct repair procedure. The repair procedures within a section are in numerical order. However, the repair steps within a given procedure are organized in the order the repair must be performed regardless of the numerical order of the steps. The user must use the contents pages or the index at the back of the manual to locate specific topics when not using the troubleshooting trees.

Last Modified: 22-Aug-2011 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-003 How to Use the Manual

General Information This manual is divided into the same group system used for previous manuals and the Cummins' filmcard system. Section 00 is organized into a logical sequence of engine disassemble/assemble, all other sections are in numerical sequence. Refer to the Table of Contents at the front of the book to determine the section that details the desired information. The disassemble/assemble sections of this manual is divided into the same group system used for previous manuals and the Cummins' filmcard system. Section 00 is organized into a logical sequence of engine disassemble/assemble, all other sections are in numerical sequence. Refer to the Table of Contents at the front of the book to determine the section that details the desired information. Each section contains the following in sequence: z z z

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Table of Contents Required Service Tool Listings General Information containing the basic service, maintenance, design and revision information necessary to assist in the rebuild of an engine or a component Procedure instructions for the disassembly, inspection, maintenance, and assembly that can be required to rebuild an engine; additional procedures that are not necessary during every rebuild, but can be necessary, are included. These procedures depend on the length of time an engine has been in service and the conditions of the parts.

All the procedures are identified with a name and a number. Each digit in the procedure number has a specific meaning. The first three digits of the number refer to the specific section that the procedure can be found within the manual. In this example, “001” represents Section 01 - Cylinder Block. This number will range from 000 to 022. The second three digits of the number are unique and refer to a specific subject. In this example, “028” represents Cylinder Liner. This number will range from 001 to 999. Refer to Section V for specifications recommended by Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for your engine. Specifications and torque values for each engine system are

given in that section. NOTE: Discharge of oil or oily water into or upon the water is a direct violation of today's laws. Violators are subject to a penalty of various monetary charges. Dispose of these substances in accordance with standards set by the local enviromental governing agency.

Last Modified: 11-Apr-2012 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-004 Symbols

General Information The following symbols have been used in this manual to help communicate the intent of the instructions. When one of the symbols appears, it conveys the meaning defined below:

Last Modified: 12-Mar-2002 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-005 Illustrations

General Information Some of the illustrations throughout this manual are generic and will not look exactly like the engine or parts used in your application. The illustrations can contain symbols to indicate an action required and an acceptable or not acceptable condition.

The illustrations are intended to show repair or replacement procedures. The procedure will be the same for all applications, although the illustration can differ.

Last Modified: 12-Mar-2002 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-006 General Safety Instructions

Important Safety Notice WARNING Improper practices, carelessness, or ignoring the warnings can cause burns, cuts, mutilation, asphyxiation or other personal injury or death. Read and understand all of the safety precautions and warnings before performing any repair. This list contains the general safety precautions that must be followed to provide personal safety. Special safety precautions are included in the procedures when they apply. z

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Work in an area surrounding the product that is dry, well lit, ventilated, free from clutter, loose tools, parts, ignition sources and hazardous substances. Be aware of hazardous conditions that can exist. Always wear protective glasses and protective shoes when working. Rotating parts can cause cuts, mutilation or strangulation. Do not wear loose-fitting or torn clothing. Remove all jewelry when working. Disconnect the battery (negative [-] cable first) and discharge any capacitors before beginning any repair work. Disconnect the air starting motor if equipped to prevent accidental engine starting. Put a "Do Not Operate" tag in the operator's compartment or on the controls. Use ONLY the proper engine barring techniques for manually rotating the engine. Do not attempt to rotate the crankshaft by pulling or prying on the fan. This practice can cause serious personal injury, property damage, or damage to the fan blade(s) causing premature fan failure. If an engine has been operating and the coolant is hot, allow the engine to cool before slowly loosening the filler cap to relieve the pressure from the cooling system. Always use blocks or proper stands to support the product before performing any service work. Do not work on anything that is supported ONLY by lifting jacks or a hoist. Relieve all pressure in the air, oil, fuel, and cooling systems before any lines, fittings, or related items are removed or disconnected. Be alert for possible pressure when disconnecting any device from a system that utilizes pressure. Do not check for pressure leaks with your hand. High pressure oil or fuel can cause personal injury. To reduce the possibility of suffocation and frostbite, wear protective clothing and ONLY disconnect liquid refrigerant (Freon) lines in a well ventilated area.

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To protect the environment, liquid refrigerant systems must be properly emptied and filled using equipment that prevents the release of refrigerant gas (fluorocarbons) into the atmosphere. Federal law requires capturing and recycling refrigerant. To reduce the possibility of personal injury, use a hoist or get assistance when lifting components that weigh 23 kg [50 lb] or more. Make sure all lifting devices such as chains, hooks, or slings are in good condition and are of the correct capacity. Make sure hooks are positioned correctly. Always use a spreader bar when necessary. The lifting hooks must not be side-loaded. Corrosion inhibitor, a component of SCA and lubricating oil, contains alkali. Do not get the substance in eyes. Avoid prolonged or repeated contact with skin. Do not swallow internally. In case of contact, immediately wash skin with soap and water. In case of contact, immediately flood eyes with large amounts of water for a minimum of 15 minutes. IMMEDIATELY CALL A PHYSICIAN. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. Naptha and Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) are flammable materials and must be used with caution. Follow the manufacturer's instructions to provide complete safety when using these materials. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. To reduce the possibility of burns, be alert for hot parts on products that have just been turned off, exhaust gas flow, and hot fluids in lines, tubes, and compartments. Always use tools that are in good condition. Make sure you understand how to use the tools before performing any service work. Use ONLY genuine Cummins® or Cummins ReCon® replacement parts. Always use the same fastener part number (or equivalent) when replacing fasteners. Do not use a fastener of lesser quality if replacements are necessary. When necessary, the removal and replacement of any guards covering rotating components, drives, and/or belts should only be carried out be a trained technician. Before removing any guards the engine must be turned off and any starting mechanisms must be isolated. All fasteners must be replaced on refitting the guards. Do not perform any repair when fatigued or after consuming alcohol or drugs that can impair your functioning. Some state and federal agencies in the United States of America have determined that used engine oil can be carcinogenic and can cause reproductive toxicity. Avoid inhalation of vapors, ingestion, and prolonged contact with used engine oil. Do not connect the jumper starting or battery charging cables to any ignition or governor control wiring. This can cause electrical damage to the ignition or governor. Always torque fasteners and fuel connections to the required specifications. Overtightening or undertightening can allow leakage. This is critical to the natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas fuel and air systems. Always test for fuel leaks as instructed, as odorant can fade. Close the manual fuel valves prior to performing maintenance and repairs, and when storing the vehicle inside. Coolant is toxic. If not reused, dispose of in accordance with local environmental regulations. The catalyst reagent contains urea. Do not get the substance in your eyes. In case of contact, immediately flood eyes with large amounts of water for a minimum of 15 minutes. Avoid prolonged contact with skin. In case of contact, immediately wash skin with soap and water. Do not swallow internally. In the

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event the catalyst reagent is ingested, contact a physician immediately. The catalyst substrate contains Vanadium Pentoxide. Vanadium Pentoxide has been determined by the State of California to cause cancer. Always wear protective gloves and eye protection when handling the catalyst assembly. Do not get the catalyst material in your eyes. In Case of contact, immediately flood eyes with large amounts of water for a minimum of 15 minutes. Avoid prolonged contact with skin. In case of contact, immediately wash skin with soap and water. The Catalyst substrate contains Vanadium Pentoxide. Vanadium Pentoxide has been determined by the State of California to cause cancer. In the event the catalyst is being replaced, dispose of in accordance with local regulations. California Proposition 65 Warning - Diesel engine exhaust and some of its constituents are known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.

Last Modified: 25-Jan-2010 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-007 General Repair Instructions

General Information This system incorporates the latest technology at the time it was manufactured; yet, it is designed to be repaired using normal repair practices performed to quality standards.

WARNING Cummins Inc. does not recommend or authorize any modifications or repairs to components except for those detailed in Cummins Service Information. In particular, unauthorized repair to safety-related components can cause personal injury or death. Below is a partial listing of components classified as safety-related: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

Air Compressor Air Controls Air Shutoff Assemblies Balance Weights Cooling Fan Fan Hub Assembly Fan Mounting Bracket(s) Fan Mounting Capscrews Fan Hub Spindle Flywheel Flywheel Crankshaft Adapter Flywheel Mounting Capscrews Fuel Shutoff Assemblies Fuel Supply Tubes Lifting Brackets Throttle Controls Turbocharger Compressor Casing Turbocharger Oil Drain Line(s) Turbocharger Oil Supply Line(s) Turbocharger Turbine Casing Vibration Damper Mounting Capscrews Manual Service Disconnect High Voltage Interlock Loop High Voltage Connectors/Connections and Harnesses High Voltage Battery System Power Inverter

27. Generator Motor 28. Clutch Pressure Plate z z

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Follow all safety instructions noted in the procedures Follow the manufacturer's recommendations for cleaning solvents and other substances used during repairs. Some solvents have been identified by government agencies as toxic or carcinogenic. Avoid excessive breathing, ingestion and contact with such substances. Always use good safety practices with tools and equipment Provide a clean environment and follow the cleaning instructions specified in the procedures All components must be kept clean during any repair. Contamination of the components will cause premature wear. Perform the inspections specified in the procedures Replace all components or assemblies which are damaged or worn beyond the specifications Use genuine Cummins new or ReCon® service parts and assemblies The assembly instructions have been written to use again as many components and assemblies as possible. When it is necessary to replace a component or assembly, the procedure is based on the use of new Cummins or Cummins ReCon® components. All of the repair services described in this manual are available from all Cummins Distributors and most Dealer locations. Follow the specified disassembly and assembly procedures to reduce the possibility of damage to the components

Welding on a Vehicle with an Electronic Controlled Fuel System CAUTION Disconnect both the positive (+) and negative (-) battery cables from the battery before welding on the vehicle. Attach the welder ground cable no more than 0.61 meters [2 feet] from the part being welded. Do not connect the ground clamp of the welder to any of the sensors, wiring harness, electronic control units or the components. Direct welding of any electronic components must not be attempted. Sensors, wiring harness, and electronic control unit should be removed if nearby welding will expose these components to temperatures beyond normal operation. Additionally, all electronic control unit connectors must be disconnected

Last Modified: 10-Jul-2012 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-008 General Cleaning Instructions

Definition of Clean Parts must be free of debris that can contaminate any engine system. This does not necessarily mean they have to appear as new. Sanding gasket surfaces until the factory machining marks are disturbed adds no value and is often harmful to forming a seal. It is important to maintain surface finish and flatness tolerances to form a quality sealing surface. Gaskets are designed to fill small voids in the specified surface finish. Sanding gasket surfaces where edge-molded gaskets are used is most often unnecessary. Edge-molded gaskets are those metal carriers with sealing material bonded to the edges of the gasket to seal while the metal portion forms a metal to metal joint for stability. Any of the small amounts of sealing material that can stick to the parts are better removed with a blunt-edged scraper on the spots rather than spending time polishing the whole surface with an air sander or disc. For those gaskets that do not have the edge molding, nearly all have a material that contains release agents to prevent sticking. Certainly this is not to say that some gaskets are not difficult to remove because the gasket has been in place a long time, has been overheated or the purpose of the release agent has been defeated by the application of some sealant. The object however is just to remove the gasket without damaging the surfaces of the mating parts without contaminating the engine (don't let the little bits fall where they can not be removed). Bead blasting piston crowns until the dark stain is removed is unnecessary. All that is required is to remove the carbon build-up above the top ring and in the ring grooves. There is more information on bead blasting and piston cleaning later in this document. Cummins Inc. does not recommend sanding or grinding the carbon ring at the top of cylinder liners until clean metal is visible. The liner will be ruined and any signs of a problem at the top ring reversal point (like a dust-out) will be destroyed. It is necessary to remove the carbon ring to provide for easier removal of the piston assembly. A medium bristle, high quality, steel wire wheel that is rated above the rpm of the power tool being used will be just as quick and there will be less damage. Yes, one must look carefully for broken wires after the piston is removed but the wires are more visible and can be attracted by a magnet. Oil on parts that have been removed from the engine will attract dirt in the air. The dirt will adhere to the oil. If possible, leave the old oil on the part until it is ready to be

cleaned, inspected and installed, and then clean it off along with any attracted dirt. If the part is cleaned then left exposed it can have to be cleaned again before installation. Make sure parts are lubricated with clean oil before installation. They do not need to be oiled all over but do need oil between moving parts (or a good lube system priming process conducted before cranking the engine). Bead blasting parts to remove exterior paint is also usually unnecessary. The part will most likely be painted again so all that needs happen is remove any loose paint.

Abrasive Pads and Abrasive Paper The keyword here is "abrasive". There is no part of an engine designed to withstand abrasion. That is they are all supposed to lock together or slide across each other. Abrasives and dirt particles will degrade both functions.

WARNING Abrasive material must be kept out of or removed from oil passages and parts wear points. Abrasive material in oil passages can cause bearing and bushing failures that can progress to major component damage beyond reuse. This is particularly true of main and rod bearings. Cummins Inc. does not recommend the use of emery cloth or sand paper on any part of an assembled engine or component including but not limited to removing the carbon ridge from cylinder liners or to clean block decks or counterbores. Great care must be taken when using abrasive products to clean engine parts, particularly on partially assembled engines. Abrasive cleaning products come in many forms and sizes. All of them contain aluminum oxide particles, silicon carbide, or sand or some other similar hard material. These particles are harder than most of the parts in the engine. Since they are harder, if they are pressed against softer material they will either damage the material or become embedded in it. These materials fall off the holding media as the product is used. If the products are used with power equipment the particles are thrown about the engine. If the particles fall between two moving parts, damage to the moving parts is likely. If particles that are smaller than the clearance between the parts while they are at rest (engine stopped), but larger than the running clearance then damage will occur when the parts move relative to each other (engine started). While the engine is running and there is oil pressure, particles that are smaller than the bearing clearance are likely to pass between the parts without damage and be trapped in the oil filter. However, particles larger than the bearing clearance will remove material from one part and can become embedded in one of the parts. Once embedded in one part it will abrade the other part until contact is no longer being made between the two parts. If the damage sufficiently degrades the oil film, the two parts will come into contact

resulting in early wear-out or failure from lack of effective lubrication. Abrasive particles can fly about during cleaning it is very important to block these particles from entering the engine as much as possible. This is particularly true of lubricating oil ports and oil drilling holes, especially those located downstream of the lubricating oil filters. Plug the holes instead of trying to blow the abrasive particles and debris with compressed air because the debris is often simply blown further into the oil drilling. All old gasket material must be removed from the parts gasket surfaces. However, it is not necessary to clean and polish the gasket surface until the machining marks are erased. Excessive sanding or buffing can damage the gasket surface. Many newer gaskets are of the edge molded type (a steel carrier with a sealing member bonded to the steel). What little sealing material that can adhere is best removed with a bluntedged scraper or putty knife. Cleaning gasket surfaces where an edge-molded gasket is used with abrasive pads or paper is usually a waste of time.

WARNING Excessive sanding or grinding the carbon ring from the top of the cylinder liners can damage the liner beyond reuse. The surface finish will be damaged and abrasive particles can be forced into the liner material which can cause early cylinder wear-out or piston ring failures. Tape off or plug all openings to any component interior before using abrasive pads or wire brushes. If really necessary because of time to use a power tool with abrasive pads, tape the oil drillings closed or use plug and clean as much of the surface as possible with the tool but clean around the oil hole/opening by hand so as to prevent contamination of the drilling. Then remove the tape or plug and clean the remaining area carefully and without the tool. DO NOT use compressed air to blow the debris out of oil drilling on an assembled engine! More likely than not, the debris can be blown further into the drilling. Using compressed air is fine if both ends of the drilling are open but that is rarely the case when dealing with an assembled engine.

Gasket Surfaces The object of cleaning gasket surfaces is to remove any gasket material, not refinish the gasket surface of the part. Cummins Inc. does not recommend any specific brand of liquid gasket remover. If a liquid gasket remover is used, check the directions to make sure the material being cleaned will not be harmed. Air powered gasket scrapers can save time but care must be taken to not damage the surface. The angled part of the scraper must be against the gasket surface to

prevent the blade from digging into the surface. Using air powered gasket scrapers on parts made of soft materials takes skill and care to prevent damage. Do not scrape or brush across the gasket surface if at all possible.

Solvent and Acid Cleaning Several solvent and acid-type cleaners can be used to clean the disassembled engine parts (other than pistons. See Below). Experience has shown that the best results can be obtained using a cleaner that can be heated to 90° to 95° Celsius (180° to 200° Fahrenheit). Kerosene emulsion based cleaners have different temperature specifications, see below. A cleaning tank that provides a constant mixing and filtering of the cleaning solution will give the best results. Cummins Inc. does not recommend any specific cleaners. Always follow the cleaner manufacturer's instructions. Remove all the gasket material, o-rings, and the deposits of sludge, carbon, etc., with a wire brush or scraper before putting the parts in a cleaning tank. Be careful not to damage any gasket surfaces. When possible, steam clean the parts before putting them in the cleaning tank.

WARNING When using solvents, acids, or alkaline materials for cleaning, follow the manufacturers recommendations for use. Wear goggles and protective clothing to reduce the possibility of personal injury. Experience has shown that kerosene emulsion based cleaners perform the best to clean pistons. These cleaners should not be heated to temperature in excess of 77°C (170°F). The solution begins to break down at temperatures in excess of 82°C (180° F) and will be less effective. Do not use solutions composed mainly of chlorinated hydrocarbons with cresols, phenols and/or cresylic components. They often do not do a good job of removing deposits from the ring groove and are costly to dispose of properly. Solutions with a pH above approximately 9.5 will cause aluminum to turn black; therefore do not use high alkaline solutions. Chemicals with a pH above 7.0 are considered alkaline and those below 7.0 are acidic. As you move further away from the neutral 7.0, the chemicals become highly alkaline or highly acidic. Remove all the gasket material, o-rings, and the deposits of sludge, carbon, etc., with a wire brush or scraper before putting the parts in a cleaning tank. Be careful to not damage any gasket surfaces. When possible use hot high pressure water or steam clean the parts before putting them in the cleaning tank. Removing the heaviest dirt

before placing in the tank will allow the cleaner to work more effectively and the cleaning agent will last longer. Rinse all the parts in hot water after cleaning. Dry completely with compressed air. Blow the rinse water from all the capscrew holes and the oil drillings. If the parts are not to be used immediately after cleaning, dip them in a suitable rust proofing compound. The rust proofing compound must be removed from the parts before assembly or installation on the engine.

Steam Cleaning Steam cleaning can be used to remove all types of dirt that can contaminate the cleaning tank. It is a good method for cleaning the oil drillings and coolant passages

WARNING When using a steam cleaner, wear safety glasses or a face shield, as well as protective clothing. Hot steam can cause serious personal injury. Do not steam clean the following components: z z z z z z z z z z z

Electrical Components Wiring Harnesses Belts and Hoses Bearings (ball or taper roller) Electronic Control Module (ECM) ECM Connectors Capacitive Coil Driver Module (CCD) Ignition Coils and Leads NOx Sensor Fuel Control Valve Throttle Driver and Actuator.

Plastic Bead Cleaning Cummins Inc. does not recommend the use of glass bead blast or walnut shell media on any engine part. Cummins Inc. recommends using only plastic bead media, Part Number 3822735 or equivalent on any engine part. Never use sand as a blast media

to clean engine parts. Glass and walnut shell media when not used to the media manufacturer's recommendations can cause excess dust and can embed in engine parts that can result in premature failure of components through abrasive wear. Plastic bead cleaning can be used on many engine components to remove carbon deposits. The cleaning process is controlled by the use of plastic beads, the operating pressure and cleaning time.

CAUTION Do not use bead blasting cleaning methods on aluminum pistons skirts or the pin bores in any piston, piston skirt or piston crown. Small particles of the media will embed in the aluminum or other soft metal and result in premature wear of the cylinder liner, piston rings, pins and pin bores. Valves, turbocharger shafts, etc., can also be damaged. Follow the cleaning directions listed in the procedures.

CAUTION Do not contaminate wash tanks and tank type solvent cleaners with the foreign material and plastic beads. Remove the foreign material and plastic beads with compressed air, hot high pressure water or steam before placing them in tanks or cleaners. The foreign material and plastic beads can contaminate the tank and any other engine parts cleaned in the tank. Contaminated parts may cause failures from abrasive wear. Plastic bead blasting media, Part Number 3822735, can be used to clean all piston ring grooves. Do not sure any bead blasting media on piston pin bores or aluminum skirts. Follow the equipment manufacturer's cleaning instructions. Make sure to adjust the air pressure in the blasting machine to the bead manufacturer's recommendations. Turning up the pressure can move material on the part and cause the plastic bead media to wear out more quickly. The following guidelines can be used to adapt to manufacturer's instructions: 1. Bead size: U.S. size Number 16 — 20 for piston cleaning with plastic bead media, Part Number 3822735 2. Operating Pressure — 270 kPa (40 psi) for piston cleaning. Pressure should not cause beads to break. 3. Steam clean or wash the parts with solvent to remove all of the foreign material and plastic beads after cleaning. Rinse with hot water. Dry with compressed air.

CAUTION The bead blasting operation must not disturb the metal surface. If the metal surface is disturbed the engine can be damaged due to increased parts clearance or inadequate surface finish on parts that move against other parts.

When cleaning pistons, it is not necessary to remove all the dark stain from the piston. All that is necessary is to remove the carbon on the rim and in the ring grooves. This is best done by directing the blast across the part as opposed to straight at the part. If the machining marks are disturbed by the blasting process, then the pressure is too high or the blast is being held on one spot too long. The blast operation must not disturb the metal surface. Walnut shell bead blast material is sometimes used to clean ferrous metals (iron and steel). Walnut shell blasting produces a great amount of dust particularly when the pressure if the air pressure on the blasting machine is increased above media manufacturer's recommendation. Cummins Inc. recommends not using walnut shell media to clean engine parts due to the risk media embedment and subsequent contamination of the engine. Cummins Inc. now recommends glass bead media NOT used to clean any engine parts. Glass media is too easily embedded into the material particularly in soft materials and when air pressures greater than media manufacturer's recommend are used. The glass is an abrasive so when it is in a moving part, that part is abrading all the parts in contact with it. When higher pressures are used the media is broken and forms a dust of a very small size that floats easily in the air. This dust is very hard to control in the shop, particularly if only compressed air (and not hot water) is used to blow the media after it is removed from the blasting cabinet (blowing the part off inside the cabinet may remove large accumulations but never removes all the media). Bead blasting is best used on stubborn dirt/carbon build-up that has not been removed by first steam/higher pressure washing then washing in a heated wash tank. This is particularly true of pistons. Steam and soak the pistons first then use the plastic bead method to safely remove the carbon remaining in the grooves (instead of running the risk of damaging the surface finish of the groove with a wire wheel or end of a broken piston ring. Make sure the parts are dry and oil free before bead blasting to prevent clogging the return on the blasting machine. Always direct the bead blaster nozzle "across" rather than directly at the part. This allows the bead to get under the unwanted material. Keep the nozzle moving rather than hold on one place. Keeping the nozzle directed at one-place too long causes the metal to heat up and be moved around. Remember that the spray is not just hitting the dirt or carbon. If the machining marks on the piston groove or rim have been disturbed then there has not been enough movement of the nozzle and/or the air pressure is too high. Never bead blast valve stems. Tape or use a sleeve to protect the stems during bead blasting. Direct the nozzle across the seat surface and radius rather than straight at them. The object is to remove any carbon build up and continuing to blast to remove the stain is a waste of time.

Fuel System

When servicing any fuel system components, which can be exposed to potential contaminants, prior to disassembly, clean the fittings, mounting hardware, and the area around the component to be removed. If the surrounding areas are not cleaned, dirt or contaminants can be introduced into the fuel system. The internal drillings of some injectors are extremely small and susceptible to plugging from contamination. Some fuel injection systems can operate at very high pressures. High pressure fuel can convert simple particles of dirt and rust into a highly abrasive contaminant that can damage the high pressure pumping components and fuel injectors. Electrical contact cleaner can be used if steam cleaning tools are not available. Use electrical contact cleaner rather than compressed air, to wash dirt and debris away from fuel system fittings. Diesel fuel on exposed fuel system parts attracts airborne contaminants. Choose lint free towels for fuel system work. Cap and plug fuel lines, fittings, and ports whenever the fuel system is opened. Rust, dirt, and paint can enter the fuel system whenever a fuel line or other component is loosened or removed from the engine. In many instances, a good practice is to loosen a line or fitting to break the rust and paint loose, and then clean off the loosened material. When removing fuel lines or fittings from a new or newly-painted engine, make sure to remove loose paint flakes/chips that can be created when a wrench contacts painted line nuts or fittings, or when quick disconnect fittings are removed. Fuel filters are rated in microns. The word micron is the abbreviation for a micrometer, or one millionth of a meter. The micron rating is the size of the smallest particles that will be captured by the filter media. As a reference, a human hair is 76 microns [0.003 in] in diameter. One micron measures 0.001 mm [0.00004 in.]. The contaminants being filtered out are smaller than can be seen with the human eye, a magnifying glass, or a low powered microscope. The tools used for fuel system troubleshooting and repair are to be cleaned regularly to avoid contamination. Like fuel system parts, tools that are coated with oil or fuel attract airborne contaminants. Remember the following points regarding your fuel system tools: z z z z

Fuel system tools are to be kept as clean as possible. Clean and dry the tools before returning them to the tool box. If possible, store fuel system tools in sealed containers. Make sure fuel system tools are clean before use.

Last Modified: 30-Apr-2013 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

204-009 Acronyms and Abbreviations

General Information The following list contains some of the acronyms and abbreviations used in this manual. ANSI

American National Standards Institute

API

American Petroleum Institute

ASTM

American Society of Testing and Materials

BTU

British Thermal Unit

BTDC

Before Top Dead Center

°C

Celsius

CO

Carbon Monoxide

CCA

Cold Cranking Amperes

CARB

California Air Resources Board

C.I.B.

Customer Interface Box

C.I.D.

Cubic Inch Displacement

CNG

Compressed Natural Gas

CPL

Control Parts List

cSt

Centistokes

DEF

Diesel Exhaust Fluid

DOC

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst

DPF

Diesel Particulate Filter

ECM

Engine Control Module

EFC

Electronic Fuel Control

EGR

Exhaust Gas Recirculation

EPA

Environmental Protection Agency

°F

Fahrenheit

ft-lb

Foot-Pound Force

FMI

Failure Mode Indentifier

GVW

Gross Vehicle Weight

Hg

Mercury

hp

Horsepower

H2O

Water

inHg

Inches of Mercury

in H20

Inches of Water

ICM

Ignition Control Module

IEC

International Electrotechnical Commission

km/l

Kilometers per Liter

kPa

Kilopascal

LNG

Liquid Natural Gas

LPG

Liquified Petroleum Gas

LTA

Low Temperature Aftercooling

MIL

Malfunction Indicator Lamp

MPa

Megapascal

mph

Miles Per Hour

mpq

Miles Per Quart

N•m

Newton-meter

NOx

Mono-Nitrogen Oxides

NG

Natural Gas

O2

Oxygen

OBD

On-Board Diagnostics

OEM

Original Equipment Manufacturer

OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

PID

Parameter Identification Descriptions

ppm

Parts Per Million

psi

Pounds Per Square Inch

PTO

Power Takeoff

REPTO

Rear Power Take Off

RGT

Rear Gear Train

rpm

Revolutions Per Minute

SAE

Society of Automotive Engineers

SCA

Supplemental Coolant Additive

SCR

Selective Catalytic Reduction

STC

Step Timing Control

SID

Subsystem Identification Descriptions

VDC

Volts of Direct Current

VS

Variable Speed

VSS

Vehicle Speed Sensor

Last Modified: 30-Apr-2012 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

100-001 Engine Identification

Cummins® Engine Nomenclature The model name provides identification data for the engine. The graphic illustrates model name identification. The application codes are: A = Agricultural C = Construction D = Generator drive F = Fire pump G = Generator set L = Locomotive M = Marine P = Power unit R = Railcar T = Tactical military.

Engine Dataplate The engine dataplate shows specific information about the engine. (1) Engine serial number (ESN)

(2) Control parts list (CPL) (3) Model (4) Provide information for ordering parts and service needs. The engine dataplate must not be changed unless approved by Cummins Inc.

Fuel Pump Dataplate The fuel pump dataplate is located on the top of the fuel pump. It provides information for fuel pump calibration.

ECM Dataplate

The external ECM dataplate is located on top of the ECM. The dataplate contains the following: z

z

z

z

z

ECM part number (P/N) ECM serial number (S/N) Manufacturer date code (D/C) Engine serial number (ESN) Calibration loaded in the ECM (ECM code).

On the ECM mounting flange the following information is provided: z

z z

ECM part number Voltage rating ECM serial number.

Last Modified: 06-Oct-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

100-002 Engine Diagrams

Engine Views The illustrations show the locations of the major external engine components, the filters and other service and maintenance points. Some external components will be at different locations for different engine models. The engine shown is a KTTA19, KT19 and KTA19 engines will not have the low pressure turbocharger and piping.

Left Side View 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

Aftercooler Cold start port Oil fill Fuel inlet Rocker lever cover Rocker lever housing Provision for oil pressure gauge Cam follower covers Bypass oil filter supply Full flow oil filters Dipstick tube Flywheel housing Oil pan Provision for sump heater Front plate oil drain Oil pan adapter Fuel filters Accessory drive pulley Fuel pump Front gear cover Tachometer drive

22. 23. 24. 25.

Fuel pressure port Fuel Return to tank Water outlet Engine coolant vent.

Right Side View 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

High pressure turbocharger Low pressure turbocharger Water outlet Water pressure pickup Thermostat housing Fan hub (gear driven) Water pressure or temperature pickup Water bypass tube Alternator Water pump Petcock for water drain Heater return port Water pump inlet housing Water inlet connection Coolant filter Oil drain Flywheel housing Starter Petcock for water drain Oil cooler Exhaust manifold Heater supply port Water shutoff valve Coolant heater port.

CENTRY™ System Models, Left Side 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Fuel shutoff valve Fuel block Rail pressure sensor Fuses (5 amp) System ground connector OEM C5 and C6 connector bracket C5 connector C6 connector Engine speed sensor Engine side datalink connector Engine harness Fuel pump ECM Electronic fuel control valve.

Oil Pressure Ports 1. Engine oil rifle plug 2. Plug - filtered oil 3. Plug - unfiltered oil. Generator Set Applications

C Power Heat Exchanger Cooled Left Side 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Control panel Lubricating oil filters Fuel filters Sea water inlet connection Sea water outlet connection.

C Power Heat Exchanger Cooled Right Side 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Turbocharger exhaust outlet connection Coolant expansion tank Heat exchanger Sea water pump Base rail Coolant filter Starter Alternator Air Cleaner.

C Power Keel Cooled Right Side 1. Coolant outlet connection to keel cooler 2. Coolant inlet connection from keel cooler.

Last Modified: 03-Oct-2006 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

100-003 Cummins® Service Engine Model Product Identification

General Information The Cummins® Service Engine Model Nomenclature procedure describes how engines are identified within Cummins service organization. This method was introduced for models after and including manufacture year 2007.

Electronic engines are identified by the first two letters, either an "IS" for On-Highway automotive or "QS" for Off-Highway industrial market applications.

The third letter is the engine platform designation followed by the engine liter size.

If the engine operates on a fuel type other than diesel, the type will be identified after the liter size.

The control system is identified with the letters "CM" followed by the control system model number.

The technology identifier after the control system designates the prevailing technology used with the engine. (See table in this procedure for letter designations.)

Example: 1. On-Highway automotive "X" 15 liter engine 2. Control system number 871 3. Technology supported; Electric EGR and Diesel Particulate Filter

Technology Exhaust Gas Recirculation

Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF)

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst

Name

Suffix

Not used

None

Pneumatic

P

Electric

E

Not used

None

Full Flow DPF

F

Partial Flow DPF

F2

Not used

None

DOC

C

3-Way Oxidation Catalytic Converter Selective Catalytic Reduction System

Nox Sensor Modular Common Rail System Integrated Dosing Control Unit

Not used

None

3-Way Catalyst

J

Not used

None

Air Driven

S

Airless

A

Not used

None

Nox Sensor

N

Used only on QSK19, 38, 50 , 60 HHP Engines

MCRS

Not Used

None

Integrated

I

Last Modified: 12-Dec-2012 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

000-999 Complete Engine - Overview

General Information WARNING Lifting the K19 engine improperly can cause equipment damage, severe personnel injury or death. Lifting must be done only by trained, experienced technicians in accordance with instructions in this manual. The procedures required to replace an engine will vary with different engine models, the type of equipment, optional equipment, and the shop facilities. Use the following procedures as a guide. NOTE: All replacement steps do not apply to all types of equipment. Complete only the steps that apply to the equipment involved. Use the equipment manufacturer's recommendations and precautions for removal of chassis parts to gain access to the engine. Rail Applications Because the K19 rail engine is mounted in a horizontal position, the engine has two additional lifting bracket locations to aid in the lifting of the engine. The front lifting bracket is mounted on the lubricating oil pan adapter by

three capscrews. The rear lifting bracket is mounted on the flywheel housing by four metric capscrews. The K19 rail engine also uses the two K19 standard lifting brackets located between the rocker lever housings.

Last Modified: 11-Nov-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

001-999 Cylinder Block - Overview

General Information Barring Mechanism The type of barring mechanism depends on the style of the front cover. On a onepiece front cover, the barring mechanism is inside the front cover. The front cover must be removed from the engine to service or rebuild the barring mechanism. This barring mechanism contains a spring loaded worm gear. The worm gear engages the camshaft gear when the barring shaft is pushed in the front cover and turned in a counterclockwise direction. The barring mechanism will only turn the engine in the direction of normal rotation. Turn the barring shaft in a clockwise direction to disengage the worm gear. If the worm gear remains engaged accidently during engine start, the engine rotation will disengage the parts without damage. The rebuild procedure for this type of barring mechanism is located in Procedure 001031. The barring mechanism on engines that contain a two-piece front cover mounts on the back of the gear housing. The general and information and the rebuild procedures for this type of barring mechanism are located in Procedure 009-035.

Camshaft The injection timing is adjusted by using different camshaft keys. The selection of a key will change the position of the camshaft lobes in relation to the timing mark on the camshaft gear. The gear must be removed to change the injection timing. The camshaft end clearance is determined by the clearance between the camshaft and the thrust plate. The camshaft gear must be removed to adjust the camshaft end clearance. On some marine engines the camshaft gear contains mounting holes for a ring gear to be mounted. The ring gear is designed to power a sea water pump. The camshaft does not have to be removed to remove the camshaft gear. Use the camshaft gear puller kit, Part Number 3376400. The two reversible jaws must point opposite from the center of the gear. Camshafts that are damaged or worn on the injector or the valve lobes must be replaced. Cummins Inc. does not recommend the grinding of camshaft lobes.

Connecting Rod Two styles of connecting rods have been used on K19 engines. The two styles are completely interchangeable and can be mixed. The original style contains two locating dowel rings between the connecting rod and the connecting rod cap. This connecting rod only has one balance pad. The current style contains four locating dowels between the connecting rod and the connecting rod cap. This connecting rod has a balance pad on both the connecting and connecting rod cap.

Crankshaft When the K19 engine was original introduced, the crankshaft contained bolt-on counterweights. These counterweights must be removed before grinding the main bearing journals. The counter weights must be installed in their original location. On the current crankshaft the counterweights are forged in place. Both styles of crankshafts are completely interchangeable. On engines that contain the bolt-on counterweight style crankshaft, the connecting rod journals must be positioned at top dead center before the pistons can be removed. On engines that contain the forged-on counter weight style crankshaft, the pistons can be removed when the connecting rod journals are positioned at top dead center or bottom dead center. Some crankshafts contain a dowel on the vibration damper mounting surface. This dowel is required to align the vibration damper correctly. This type of crankshaft must be used in applications that require the timing marks to be located on the vibration damper. Oversize main bearings and thrust bearings are available for service. Cummins Inc. recommends grinding of all of the main or the connecting rod journals when one requires grinding.

Cylinder Block Since the introduction of the K19 engine, the design of the cylinder liner counterbore has been changed. Refer to Procedure 001-026 to determine the counter bore design of the engine being serviced. On cylinder blocks with engine serial number 31118624 and greater, the top of the main bearing cap contains a 45 degree chamfer around the capscrew. A chamfered plain washer must be used on all blocks that do not contain a chamfer. Current engines contain three vent holes. The vent holes connect the oil cooler water cavity to the water hole. The water hole supplies water to the cylinder heads. The vent holes improve the fill of the coolant and the deaeration of the oil cooler. If the engine being serviced does not have the vent holes, these can be machined by using a 3/16-inch drill. Place the drill in the 3/16-inch water hole between cylinders 1 and 2, cylinders 3 and 4, and cylinders 5 and 6. Drill the hole into the water cavity.

On engines manufactured since 1977 with engine serial number 31103629 and greater, a thick wall camshaft bushing with an oil groove on the outside diameter is used. This oil groove provides sufficient oil pressure to operate a Jacobs® engine brake. During the initial production, the K19 engine contained a thin wall camshaft bushing. This bushing does not contain an oil groove on the outside diameter. Do not use a Jacobs® engine brake on an engine that contains a standard thin wall bushing. An optional thin wall bushing that contains a 131 degree oil groove on the outside diameter is available. This bushing must be used on engines that have a Jacobs® engine brake. The oil groove provides the additional oil pressure required to operate the Jacobs® engine brake. It is permissible, but not necessary, to machine an old block to convert from the thin wall bushing to the thick wall bushing. Both types of bushings are available as a service part. The inside diameter is identical on both types of bushings.

Cylinder Liner Since the introduction of the K19 engine, the design of the cylinder liner has been changed. Refer to Procedure 001-026 to identify the design and the type contained in the engine being serviced. The inside diameter is the same on all of the different designs. The installed liner protrusion is the same for all of the different designs.

Gear Cover Two different styles of front covers are used on the K19 engine. The two styles are not interchangeable. Service parts are available for both styles. The first style was used on engines built before 1980 and is still used on some marine engines. This style is commonly referred to as the two-piece front cover. This design contains two cast parts; a gear housing and a cover. Both pieces are available in cast iron or aluminum. The second style is used o most of the other engines and on some marine engines. It is commonly referred to as the one-piece front cover. This design contains a flat steel plate and an aluminum front cover. Both styles require different rebuild procedures. Instructions for both styles are included in this manual. Special capscrews must be used to attach the gear cover plate or the gear housing to the cylinder block. These capscrews contain a cone shaped washer mounted permanently on the capscrew. A different length capscrew must be used for each style. A gasket sealant or grease must not be used when installing the plate to the block, or the gear housing to the block gasket. This gasket is designed to become larger

when it contact engine oil.

Gears The idler gear bushings are machined after installation in the gear. Replacement bushings that have already been machined are not available as service parts. Engines built before 1978 contained a shaft that was press fit into the block. A 3/8inch capscrew was used to retain the gear on the shaft. Do not remove the press fit shaft from the block unless it is damaged. Other engines contain idler shafts that are attached to the block by use of a capscrew. A 13/16-inch capscrew is used to retain the shaft and the gear in the block. Some engines do not contain a hydraulic pump idler gear and shaft. The oil drilling to this shaft must be plugged by installing a 13/16-inch capscrew and a plain washer.

Oil Seals All crankshaft seals on the K19 are the Teflon™ lay-down lip (scroll) type. Many other shaft seals are also the Teflon™ lay-down lip type. The Teflon™ lay-down lip type seal does not contain a spring on the back of the sealing lip. The sealing lip is a thin, stiff piece of Teflon™. Some Teflon™ type seals contain a second sealing lip that performs as a dust lip. These seals must be used in severe operating environments, such as a high dust environment. Teflon™ seals must be dry before installation. Do not lubricate the seal or the shaft. After the first few turns of the shaft, a thin film of Teflon™ is transferred from the seal lip to the shaft. If the shaft is not clean and dry, this transfer will not occur and the seal will leak. If the seal is not the Teflon™ type, lubricate both the sealing lip and the shaft with either grease or engine oil. All oil seals must be installed in one of two ways; even with the cast surface, or even with the bottom of the entry chamfer on the seal bore.

Pistons A piston is available only as a kit. The kit contains a piston, a piston pin, and two retaining rings. Two styles of pistons are available for the K19 engine. The two styles are the premium piston and the standard piston. On the premium piston both compression ring grooves are machine in the ni-resist insert. The top of the piston is anodized for additional heat resistance. On the standard piston only the top compression ring groove is machined in the niresist insert. The top of the piston is not anodized. The premium piston is designed to perform at higher duty cycles and temperatures

than the standard piston. Use of the premium piston where the standard piston will not perform satisfactorily. All pistons are not interchangeable. Some pistons must not be mixed. The following table indicates pistons that are interchangeable for the 14.5:1 and 15.5:1 compression ratios. The piston part numbers that are noted with an asterisk (*) are premium pistons. Piston Compatibility (Compression Ration 14.5:1) Piston Part Number

Piston Part Number 3036073*

Piston Part Number 3028124

Piston Part Number 3004730

Piston Part Number 206740

3036073* Compatible with

Yes

No

Yes

No

3028124 Compatible with

No

Yes

Yes

No

3004730 Compatible with

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

206740 Compatible with

No

No

Yes

Yes

Piston Part Number

Piston Part Number 3036074*

Piston Part Number 3026270

Piston Part Number 3007750

Piston Part Number 207330

3036074* Compatible with

Yes

No

No

Yes

3026270 Compatible with

No

Yes

Yes

No

3007750 Compatible with

No

Yes

Yes

No

207330 Compatible with

Yes

No

No

Yes

Piston Compatibility (Compression Ration 14.5:1)

Vibration Damper The vibration damper controls the twisting or torsional vibration of the crankshaft. A vibration damper is engineered for use on a specific engine model. There are two types of vibration dampers used on K19 engines. One is a rubber element type and the second is a viscous type. It is not economical to repair a vibration damper in the field. Install a new or rebuilt

vibration damper if the inspection indicates that a vibration damper is defective. The viscous vibration damper has a limited service life. The damper must be replaced after 576,000 km [360,000 mi] or 15,000 hours of service.

Last Modified: 11-Nov-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

002-999 Cylinder Head - Overview

General Information Cylinder Head All K engines use the same cylinder head casting. Some models require different valves and/or valve guides because of special engine applications. Check the parts books and the CPL to determine the correct valves and correct valve guides for the engine application being serviced. After thousands of hours of severe use, small cracks will begin to appear on the combustion surface between the valves and around the injector bore. Cylinder heads with cracks that extend into, but not across the valve seat insert bore of the head can be used again. Cummins Inc. does not recommend the cracks be repaired by pinning or welding. Because of the large surface area of the valves, the valve depth in the cylinder head is critical to the engine operation. Valves that are installed to a depth greater than 0.05 mm [0.020 in] will result in excessive white smoke when an engine is operating in cold temperatures.

Cylinder Head Gasket There are two types of cylinder head gaskets compatible with the K19 engines. The K-profile cylinder head gasket and the QSK19-profile cylinder gasket

K-Profile Gasket

QSK19-Profile Gasket

The QSK19-profile gasket has a single oblong hole surrounding all three push tubes. The overall length on the push tube end of the QSK19-profile gasket is approximately 2 mm [0.08 in] longer than the K-profile gasket, causing the gasket to protrude beyond the edge of the cylinder head. All K19 engines are manufactured with the QSK19-profile gasket. The K-profile gasket is available for service. Use the QSK19-profile gasket if the mating surface of the block and head are refreshed during repair, or if the cylinder head gasket is being replaced. The K-profile gasket uses glued-in grommets to seal the coolant and oil passages. The K-profile gasket has individual holes around each push tube. Use the K-profile gasket when the mating surface of the cylinder block and head are not refreshed during repair, or if a K-profile gasket is being replaced. Field experience has found, in some cases, the K-profile gasket provides better sealing characteristics than the QSK19-profile gasket on worn cylinder blocks.

QSK19-Profile Steel Bridge Enhancement As a product improvement, a steel bridge has been added to the gasket carrier between one of the cylinder head capscrew drillings and the high pressure oil passage. The location of the durability enhancement is shown with an arrow in the illustration above.

Intake and Exhaust Valves An engine with two turbochargers require special valves. The special valves have a higher temperature resistance than the standard valves. The special valves can be used, but are not required in other K engine models. The exhaust valves are manufactured from a material that is capable of operating in higher temperatures than the intake valves. Do not install an intake valve in an exhaust valve location.

Exhaust and Intake Valve Seat Inserts The intake valve seat insert has a wide valve seat area than the exhaust valve seat insert. This change was implemented to reduce the rate of intake valve beat-in. Do not install an intake valve seat insert in an exhaust valve location. Poor engine performance will result because of restricted flow of exhaust gas. Oversize valve seats are available in the listed sizes. Outside Diameter Oversize

Depth (Thickness) Oversize

0.25 mm [0.010 in]

Standard

0.51 mm [0.020 in]

0.13 mm [0.005 in]

0.76 mm [0.030 in]

0.25 mm [0.010 in]

1.02 mm [0.040 in]

0.38 mm [0.015 in]

Anti-Swirl Plate When the K19 engine was introduced, the cylinder head did not contain an anti-swirl plate under the intake valve seat insert. Any engine that is rebuilt to the CPL number 127, 159, or 171 must not contain an anti-swirl plate in the cylinder head. Use any K cylinder head casting with an insert spacer plate installed under the intake valve seat insert. Two anti-swirl plates have been used. These anti-swirl plates are not interchangeable. For optimum engine performance, always use the correct anti-swirl plate or the insert spacer plate. Check the CPL for the correct cylinder head casting number for the engine being serviced.

Valve Guides

The standard valve guide has a tapered top surface. Both the intake valve guide and the exhaust valve guide are the same. There are valve guides with a flat top available for use with the valve stem seal. Cummins Inc. recommends the use of the flat top guides and the valve stem seals in the exhaust location on any engine that operates at idle for extended periods of time, such as a locomotive application. The standard tapered top valve guides are available in two lengths. Both of the tapered type styles must be installed so the top of the guide is within 34.93 to 35.31 mm [1.375 to 1.390 in] above the cylinder head. The flat top guides must be installed so the top of the guide is within 25.58 to 30.23 mm [1.175 to 1.190 in] above the cylinder head. This height allows for the installation of a stem seal. There are valve guides that are oversize on the outside diameter available for both the standard tapered top type and the flat top type. The two oversizes are 0.25 mm [0.010 in] and 0.38 mm [0.015 in].

Crosshead Two crosshead designs have been used on the K19 engine. The current design contains an adjusting screw that has a contact face that is larger than the thread diameter. The previous design contains an adjusting screw that has a contact face slightly smaller than the thread diameter. The previous design can be modified to use the new adjusting screw. The depth of the valve stem pocket must be within 7.24 to 7.75 mm [0.285 to 0.305 in] to use the new adjusting screw. Use a 37/64-inch diameter end mill to machine the valve stem pocket approximately 4.19 mm [0.165 in] deeper. An oversize crosshead guide is available for service. The cylinder head must be machined to maintain a 0.13 to 0.53 mm [0.0005 to 0.0021 in] press fit. The oversize guide is oversize only in the part that presses into the cylinder head. A standard crosshead is used with an oversize guide. Stemless crossheads were introduced on the K19 in July 1995 ESN first 37158462. The stemless crosshead requires no adjustment and can be positioned on the valve stem tips in either direction. Stemless and Stemmed crossheads can be intermixed within an engine. Stemless crossheads can be used with the crosshead guide installed.

Last Modified: 11-Nov-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

003-999 Rocker Levers - Overview

General Information Rocker Lever Adjusting Screw Some of the engines previously manufactured contain a slotted adjusting screw. A non-slotted adjusting screw must be used if a Jacobs® Engine Brake is going to be installed. The non-slotted adjusting screw will maintain sufficient oil pressure to operate the Jacobs® engine brake.

Rocker Levers All of the rocker levers contain replaceable bushings. The rocker lever pad on the intake and exhaust levers is precision ground and must not be repaired. The socket on the injector lever is replaceable. Both the intake and exhaust levers contain a blind rivet. The rivet plugs the oil drilling in the lever. The rivets must be present. The rivets provide sufficient oil pressure to operate a Jacobs® engine brake. A special injector rocker lever must be used if a Jacobs® engine brake is going to be installed. This lever contains an arm that makes contact with the actuator piston on the Jacobs® engine brake.

Rocker Lever Shaft Some rocker lever shafts have two oil holes at the exhaust lever location. If a Jacobs® engine brake is going to be installed, the oil hole that is not in alignment with the oil hole at the intake lever location must be plugged. Use a rocker lever shaft plug. The plug is needed to maintain sufficient oil pressure to allow the Jacobs® engine brake to operate properly.

Last Modified: 20-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

004-999 Cam Followers/Tappets - Overview

General Information Pressurized engine oil is supplied to each cam follower assembly through an oil drilling in the shaft rear mounting capscrew of each assembly. The special slotted capscrews permit the oil on flow to the shaft, levers, sockets, and rollers.

Cam Follower Cover There are four styles of cam follower covers available: z z z z

Plain With an oil fill With a crankcase breather With a tapped hole to mount the high volume variable time oil drain back tube.

All cam follower covers are manufactured from aluminum. The mounting location for each style depends to the selected engine option.

Cam Follower Assembly The cam follower assembly torque is important because of the special slotted screws. the capscrews must be tightened within 39 to 42 N•m [29 to 31 ft-lb]. Excess torque can cause the capscrew to break. Insufficient torque can cause the capscrew to loosen during engine operation. New cam follower lever and roller assemblies are coated with a heavy preservative compound. They must be cleaned and lubricated with engine oil before each assembly is installed on the engine.

Cam Follower Shaft The oil drilling in the shaft is open at both ends. This means that either end of the shaft can be installed toward the front of the engine. The ring dowel bores must not have any burrs to install the assembly by hand. The cup plug in the end of the shaft keeps the flow of the pressurized oil in the shaft instead of dumping the oil into the camshaft cavity in the block. This cup plug must be installed on the end of the shaft, outside the capscrew hole.

Cam Follower Sockets

The Cummins K engine family uses a replaceable cam follower socket. This socket allows pressurized oiling of the roller, pin, and push rod. Sockets in the valve and the injector levers are interchangeable. The sockets have a press fit into the lever. To maintain a press fit, the loose sockets must be replaced if the socket is worn or damaged in the area where it contacts the push rod.

Cam Follower Push Rods Some of the previous Cummins K engine family push rods have hollow tube style injector push rods. The ends of the push rods are press fit into the tube. These push rods can be used again if both ends are secure and not loose. The current push rods are machined from solid bar stock instead of tubing. The ball end and the socket are machined on the rod. A loose socket end retainer on the push rod is acceptable as long as the retainer is not in danger of separating from the rod. It is a good service practice to mark the push rods for location when removing them from the engine. The valve and injector push rods are not interchangeable. The cam follower socket must be replaced if the push rod is worn or damaged in the area where it contacts the socket. Replace both the rocker lever adjusting screw and push rod if the socket surface in the rod or on the adjusting screw is damaged.

Last Modified: 29-Nov-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

005-999 Fuel System - Overview

General Information The listed publications are available to provide fuel system installation recommendations approved by Cummins Inc.: z

Automotive Installation Recommendations (Fuel System), Bulletin 952849

For parts and service publication purchase information, refer to Additional Service Literature Procedure 205-001.

Contact the nearest Cummins authorized repair location for engine fuel system specifications and requirements provided on the engine data sheet for the specific engine and application.

Theory of Operation - STC Fuel System STC was previously referred to as hydraulic variable timing. The STC system allows an engine to operate with advanced injection timing under a light load condition at any engine speed. STC allows an engine to operate with normal injection timing under a heavy load condition. Injection timing is changed by supplying engine oil in metered amounts to a hydraulic tappet located on the injector. When the tappet is filled with engine oil the injection timing is advanced. When the tappet is not filled with engine oil the injection timing is to the normal mode. When the fuel rail pressure exceeds 365 kPa [53 psi], the injection timing will change from the advanced mode to the normal mode. When the fuel rail pressure drops below 159 kPa [23 psi], the injection timing will return from the normal mode to the advanced mode. It will remain in the advanced mode until the fuel rail pressure exceeds 365 kPa [53 psi]. The STC tappet assembly contains a plunger and sleeve that are machined to a very precise tolerance. The assembly is then matched by a selection process at the factory (matched-fit). Never interchange or mix the plungers and the sleeves. The tappet assembly and injector are not matched sets. The tappet assembly can be used in any STC injector. Cummins Inc., recommends STC tappet disassembly only if there is evidence that the debris that caused the failure has moved beyond the full-flow filters. Any debris in the tappet will adversely effect the tappet operation. The method of adjusting the injection timing and injector rocker lever travel on engines with STC is the same as the method used on engines without STC. The specification for injector travel and injection timing on engines with STC is different than engines without STC. The fuel pressure switch is compatible with both the 12 VDC and 24 VDC system. The fuel pressure switch is normally in the closed position. The switch will be in the open position when the fuel rail pressure exceeds 365 kPa [53 psi]. One terminal of the switch is wired to the positive terminal of the fuel pump shutoff valve. The second terminal is wired to the positive terminal on the STC control valve. A STC oil control valve is available for the 12 VDC or 72 VDC systems. It is normally in the closed position. The valve will be in the open position to allow the oil to flow to the STC oil manifold when the solenoid is energized. The STC pressure relief valve contains a 0.51 mm [0.020 in] orifice to control the flow of the oil to the STC oil manifold during normal injection timing. A 14 to 40 kPa [2 to 6 psi] check ball maintains a supply of pressurized oil in the oil manifold to prevent air from entering the system during the normal mode. The wiring harness receives power from the fuel pump solenoid. The wiring will send signals from the fuel rail pressure switch to the oil control valve. A diode is contained in the wiring harness. The wires and the diode can be checked for defects by using a multimeter, Part Numbers 3164488, 3164489, or ay multimeter or volt-ohmmeter that has a rating of 10,000 ohm per volt or greater.

The hydromechanical control valve replaces the electric fuel pressure switch and the electric oil control valve. The hydromechanical valve provides the same function as the parts it replaces. This manual does not cover calibration of the hydromechanical control valve. Refer to Additional Service Literature Procedure 205-001 for further reference.

PT (Type G) AFC Connection and Adjustment Locations 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Tachometer drive AFC air supply AFC fuel return Priming plug Fuel to the injector Shutoff valve electric connection Gear pump fuel return to drain Fuel inlet connection Idle speed screw location Fuel rate (pressure) screw.

PT (Type G) AFC-VS Connection and Adjustment Locations 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Tachometer drive AFC air supply Fuel to the injectors VS high speed screw VS low (idle) speed screw Gear pump fuel return to drain Fuel inlet connection Idle speed screw location Fuel rate (pressure) screw.

Fuel Recommendations Cummins diesel engines have been developed to take advantage of the high energy content and generally lower cost of Number 2 diesel fuels. A Cummins diesel engine will also operate satisfactorily on Number 1 or other fuels within the specifications found in the Fuels for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001. For information on PT fuel pump rebuild and calibration, refer to the Fuel Pump PT (Type G) Rebuild Calibration Instructions, Bulletin 3379084. For PT fuel pump calibration values use the table below to select the correct bulletin. Pump Code Release Date

Calibration Value Bulletin

1970 to 1975

3379068

1976 to 1980

3379182

1981 to 1989

3379352

1990 to 2004

3666011

Last Modified: 30-Jul-2007 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

200-001 Flow Diagram, Fuel System

Flow Diagram

Fuel Flow Through Fuel Pump

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

AFC cavity drain Fuel rail pressure line Injector Injector fuel drain return Fuel return to tank Fuel tank breather Fuel inlet supply Fuel filter Gear pump coolant drain Fuel pump Tachometer drive.

Last Modified: 03-Oct-2006 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

006-999 Injectors and Fuel Lines - Overview

General Information Step Timing Control The step timing control system allows an engine to operate with advanced injection timing under a light load condition at any engine speed. Step timing control allows an engine to operate with normal injection timing under a heavy load condition. Injection timing is changed by supplying engine oil in metered amounts to a hydraulic tappet located on the injector. When the tappet is filled with engine oil the injection timing is advanced. When the tappet is not filled with engine oil the injection timing is in the normal mode. When the fuel rail pressure exceeds 365 kPa [53 psi], the injection timing will change from the advanced mode to the normal mode. When the fuel rail pressure drops below 159 kPa [23 psi], the injection timing will return from the normal mode to the advanced mode. It will remain in the advanced mode until the fuel rail pressure exceeds 365 kPa [53 psi]. The step timing control tappet assembly contains a plunger and sleeve that are machined to a very precise tolerance. The assembly is then matched by a selection process at the factory (match-fit). Never interchange or mix the plungers and the sleeves. The tappet assembly and injector are not matched sets. The tappet assembly can be used in any step timing control injector. Cummins Inc. recommends step timing control tappet disassembly only if there is evidence that the debris that caused the failure has moved beyond the full-flow filters. Any debris in the tappet will adversely effect the tappet operation. The method of adjusting the injection timing and injector rocker lever travel on engines with step timing control is the same as the method used on engines without step timing control. The specification for the injector travel and injection timing on engines with step timing control is different than engines without step timing control. The fuel pressure switch is compatible with both the 12 VDC and 24 VDC system. The fuel pressure switch is normally in the closed position. The switch will be in the open position when the fuel rail pressure exceeds 365 kPa [53 psi]. One terminal of the switch is wired to the positive terminal of the fuel pump shutoff valve. The second terminal is wired to the positive terminal on the step timing control valve.

A step timing control oil control valve is available for either the 12 VDC or the 24 VDC system. It is normally in the closed position . The valve will be in the open position to allow the oil flow to the step timing control oil manifold when the solenoid is energized. The step timing control pressure relief valve contains a 0.51 mm [0.020 in] orifice to control the flow of the oil to the step timing control oil manifold during normal injection timing. A 14 to 40 kPa [2 to 6 psi] check ball maintains a supply of pressurized oil in the oil manifold to prevent air from entering the system during the normal mode. The wiring harness receives power from the fuel pump solenoid. The wiring will send signals from the fuel rail pressure switch to the oil control valve. A diode is contained in the wiring harness. The wires and diode can be checked for defects by using a multimeter or any volt-ohmmeter that has a rating of 10,000 ohm per volt or greater. The junction timing is the relative measurement of the distance remaining between the injector plunger and the injector cup when the piston is 5.16 mm [0.2032 in], or 19 degrees before top dead center on the compression stroke. Injector timing is expressed by the amount of push rod travel remaining.

The injector timing code appears on the engine dataplate. Codes are alphabetic letters that relate to a numerical specification. Specifications can be found in this manual and the CPL manual.

The timing codes and specifications for K19 engines are shown in the graphic.

Advanced timing means the fuel is injected earlier into the cylinder during the compression stroke. Retarded timing means the fuel injection occurs closer to top dead center in the cylinder.

The amount of push rod travel determines the time of fuel injection in relation to the piston position. The higher the numerical value of the push rod travel remaining indicates a greater degree of retarded or slow timing.

The lower the numerical value of the push rod travel remaining indicates a greater degree of advanced or fast timing.

Injector timing changes are accomplished by advancing or retarding the cam follower action in relation to the piston position. This is accomplished by changing the orientation of the camshaft lobe to the cam follower using different camshaft gear keys. Gear train timing (index mark alignment) always remain the same.

The camshaft key provides a means of indexing the camshaft with the gear. Offset keys allow the camshaft profile to be rotated slightly while the gear train timing remains the same. The more the top of the offset is moved in the direction of the camshaft normal rotation, the more

the injection timing will be retarded. The push rod travel numerical value will increase. The direction of normal rotation on a K19 engine crankshaft is clockwise as viewed from the front.

Offset keys can be identified by measuring the offset and referring to the following chart. Each 0.025 mm [0.001 in] of offset will cause a 0.0127 mm [0.0005 in] change in the push rod travel from a straight key.

Use the recommended key shown if the camshaft, gear, or the timing code has been changed. If checking or setting the injection timing, it is recommended to use a testing gear. A testing gear is a camshaft gear that has been modified to provide a slip-fit on the crankshaft.

Last Modified: 29-Nov-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

007-999 Lubricating Oil System - Overview

General Information WARNING Some state and federal agencies have determined that used engine oil can be carcinogenic and cause reproductive toxicity. Avoid inhalation of vapors, ingestion, and prolonged contact with used engine oil. If not reused, dispose of in accordance with local environmental regulations.

The use of low viscosity oil, such as 10W or 10W30, can be used to aid in starting the engine and in providing sufficient oil flow at ambient temperatures below -5°C [23°F], but continuous use of low viscosity oil can decrease engine life due to wear.

A used oil analysis can help diagnose internal damage and determine if it was caused by one of the following:

z

z z z

Intake air filter malfunction Coolant leaks Oil diluted with fuel Metal particles causing wear.

Do not disassemble an engine for repair based only on the results of an oil analysis. Also, inspect the oil filter. If the filter shows evidence of internal damage, find the source of the problem and repair the damage. Refer to Procedure 007-083 for oil filter inspection. The Lubricating Oil Filter Head contains two spring loaded plungers. One plunger controls the oil pressure for the piston cooling nozzles. The second spring plunger will bypass oil if a filter element becomes plugged or clogged. When installing a new filter element, always check to be sure there is no interference between the filter head adapter and the element. The oil filter remote option has a transfer connection and a remote filter head. The transfer connection is attached to the block in the same manner as the standard filter head. The transfer connection also houses the pressure regulator plunger for the piston cooling nozzles. The remote filter head houses the pressure regulator plunger for the filter bypass. NOTE: The transfer connection gasket is the same as the filter head gasket, but the tab on the end of the gasket must be removed. Lubricating Oil Pan sumps are available in various capacities. Refer to Procedure 018-017 for oil pan capacities. When a rear gear train option is specified, add 7.5 liters [2 U.S. gallons] to the sump capacity. Service dipsticks are available in two types. The first type is the locking type. The second is the bottle stopper type that does not lock. When converting from one style to the other, change both the dipstick and oil gauge tube. NOTE: Service dipsticks are supplied by length. The dipsticks do not have the high and low marks indicated. Do not calibrate the dipstick until the engine is installed in the application that its to be used. Lubricating Oil Pumps on engines manufactured after engine serial number 31117701 contain a lubricating oil pump that uses a roll pin to secure the pressure regulator assembly. The lubricating oil pump must be removed from the engine to service the pressure regulator assembly. Engines manufactured prior to engine serial number 31117702 contain a lubricating oil pump that uses a retaining ring to secure the pressure regulator assembly. The lubricating oil pump does not need to be removed to service the pressure regulator assembly. Use a pressure regulator removal tool, Part Number 3375055.

The Lubricating Oil Cooler on engines manufactured prior to 1976 contain two oil transfer tubes. The tubes connect the oil cooler housing to the block. These tubes can be omitted when using the current block to oil cooler housing gasket. Oil cooler housings and covers are cast iron. Oil cooler housings made from aluminum are no longer available for production or service. Do not reuse an oil cooler element after a progressive damage failure has resulted in metal particles in the lube oil filter. There is no practical method to clean the oil cooler core and metal particles can be circulated through the lubricating system and cause engine damage after a repair. Do not allow dirt or gasket material to enter the oil passages when cleaning the oil filter head or cylinder block surfaces. Oil cooler elements used in production and service before September 1997 have 3/8-24 UNF threads in the mounting feet. Oil cooler elements used in production and service beginning September 1997 have 3/8-16 UNC thread in the mounting feet. It is acceptable to use old and new coolers in the same engine. The oil cooler elements used on K19 engines and QSK19 engines are not interchangeable. The QSK19 oil cooler element is larger than the K19. The engine mounted Torque Converter Cooler/Marine Gear Cooler are available as an option. This option can be added to a standard engine by purchasing the torque converter cooler housing, the cooler cover, and the elements. The location of the turbocharger drain line and other components will have to be changed on some engines. The torque converter cooler is mounted and replaces the lubricating oil cooler cover. When the torque converter cooler option is selected, longer mounting capscrews must be used.

Last Modified: 27-Oct-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

200-002 Flow Diagram, Lubricating Oil System

Flow Diagram

Front View 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Oil supply to turbocharger Oil supply to fan hub Oil supply to camshaft bushing Main oil rifle Oil supply to idler gear and hydraulic pump drive Oil supply to air compressor and fuel pump drive Oil supply to main bearing and idler Oil supply to water pump housing.

Left Side View 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Rocker lever Cam follower Main oil rifle Oil supply to main bearings Oil supply to connecting rods Oil supply to piston pin bushing.

Rear View 1. 2. 3. 4.

Oil supply to hydraulic pump driveshaft bushings Main oil rifle Oil supply to lower idler shaft Oil supply to center hydraulic pump driveshaft bushing.

Right Side View 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Oil cooler elements Turbocharger oil supply Oil cooler housing Lubricating oil pump Lubricating oil pump regulator Oil suction tube Oil to filter head Turbocharger oil drain.

Filter Head 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Filter head Filter bypass valve Oil before filter Full flow filter Oil to filter head.

Filter Head 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Main oil rifle Oil filter head Full flow filter Piston cooling control valve Piston cooling oil rifle Piston cooling nozzle Oil after filter.

Last Modified: 03-Oct-2006 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

008-999 Cooling System - Overview

General Information The primary function of the cooling system is to remove heat energy, created by the combustion process, from the engine. The excess heat energy that is not removed by the cooling system is carried away by exhaust gases and radiation into the atmosphere.

The accompanying chart illustrates the Conventional Aftercooling coolant flow through the engine. For more details, refer to the coolant flowcharts in Procedure Refer to Procedure 200-003. A. Pump B. Engine cylinder head C. Thermostat housing D. Radiator E. Oil cooler F. Aftercooler.

The accompanying chart illustrates the Low Temperature Aftercooling coolant flow through the engine. For more details, refer to the coolant flowcharts in Procedure Refer to Procedure 200-003. A. Water pump B. Base engine C. Engine thermostat D. Engine radiator E. Low temperature aftercooling thermostat F. Low temperature aftercooling radiator G. Aftercooler. The Cummins Inc. K19 engine requires a minimum pressure cap rating of 48 kPa [7 psi]. This provides a positive head pressure at the water pump inlet. The Water Pump is a centrifugal type pump. It can have either the cast iron, or the phenolic resin impeller. The cast iron impeller has been the standard for production beginning August, 2001. On aftercooled engines, the water pump impeller maintains 172 kPa [25 psi] block pressure. At 2100 rpm, the water flow is 830 liters per minute [220 U.S. gallons per minute]. The block pressure is measured at the number six rocker lever housing. On non-aftercooled engines, the water pump impeller maintains 241 kPa [35 psi] block pressure. At 2100 rpm, the water flow is 757 liters per minute [220 U.S. gallons per minute]. The block pressure is measured at the number six rocker lever housing. The water pump is gear driven by a splined drive shaft. The shaft connects the pump to the water pump drive. Drive shafts are available in two sizes. One is a 11/16-inch diameter shaft for use with a water pump containing a phenolic impeller. The second is a 3/8-inch diameter for the use with a water pump containing a cast iron impeller.

CAUTION The use of the wrong drive shaft can result in failure of the splines or the impellers.

The water pump contains two antifriction bearings that are ball type. The bearings are lubricated with pressurized oil supplied from the engine. The water pump contains an oil seal and a water seal. The cavity between these seals is vented. The vent prevents contamination of the lubricating or coolant in case of a seal leak. Oil and coolant seeping from the vent will not harm the operation. Check the vent for any obstruction at each scheduled maintenance interval.

CAUTION DO not touch the sealing surfaces of the seal and seat. The oil from your fingers can cause the seal to fail. If necessary, clean the sealing surfaces with a solvent that does not have an oil base. The water pump contains a one-piece or unitized water seal. The seal and the seat are fastened together. This helps prevent failures caused from dirt or oil contacting the seal faces during installation.

CAUTION The water pump seal must be installed to the correct dimension from the water pump body. Correct installation will result in proper spring tension. Incorrect spring tension will cause the seal to fail. One drop of Loctite® 290, Part Number 3823682 (50 mL), 3824039 (10 mL) or equivalent, must be applied at the joint between the seat and the shaft. More than one drop of fluid can get on the sealing faces and cause the seal to fail. Fan Hubs are available in three types: 1. Belt driven assembly with one of two types of spring loaded idler or an idler with a shock absorber. 2. Gear driven assembly 3. Clutch driven assembly NOTE: For installation and operation of the clutch driven assembly, reference Bulletin 3387082, K-1150 Fan Clutch Operation and Installation. For rebuild instructions for the clutch driven assembly, reference Bulletin 3387063, K-1150 Fan Clutch Rebuild. Belt Driven Fan Hub equipped engines have the fan belt tensioned by the spring loaded idler assembly and does not require adjustment.

CAUTION To prevent accidents, always release the spring tension before replacing the fan belt. When the pivot arm cap is aligned properly with the spring, tension is a minimum of 54 n•m [40 ft-lb].

A grease nipple is on some pivot arms. The pivot arm must be greased at each schedule maintenance interval. Do not grease the pivot arm that does not have a grease fitting. If there is no grease fitting then the bushings work without grease. Either a turnbuckle, an enclosed spring, or a shock absorber is used to limit the travel of the idler pulley. Check the shock absorber for fluid leakage and loss of vibration absorption at each scheduled maintenance interval. Fan hubs are available in various drive ratios and fan center locations. When replacing the fan hub, always check the part number to be sure the replacement is compatible. All of the belt driven fan supports contain antifriction bearings that are tapered roller type. Bearing end clearance is controlled by the use of an inner and outer bearing spacer. It is a good service practice to tag the bearings for location when removing them. Always replace both the bearing and bearing race if either piece requires replacement. The idler pulley contains two antifriction bearings that are tapered roller type. The bearing end clearance is set properly by matching select components in the kit.

CAUTION Always replace the complete bearing kit when any one piece requires replacement. Failure to do this will result in premature equipment failure. The kit includes a retaining ring, an inner spacer, two bearings, and two bearing races.

CAUTION Never use too much grease on the bearings. Too much grease will cause an overheating due to the agitation of the grease. Excessive agitation of grease will result in failure. The following is the proper method of applying water pump type grease. Do not use lithium base grease for fan hub bearings. 1. Pack both bearings with grease. 2. Fill the cavity between the bearings 2/3-full with grease. 3. Fill the cavity above the front bearing 2/3-full with grease. Gear Driven Fan Hubs support assemblies are available in various drive ratios. When replacing either the fan support assembly, or the gear and shaft assembly, check the part numbers to be sure the replacement part is compatible.

WARNING To reduce the possibility of personal injury or damage to equipment, never remove the gear from the shaft. Damage to the press can result due to the high press fit or weld between the gear and the shaft.

The fan hub support contains two antifriction bearings that are tapered roller type. The fan hub bearings are pressure lubricated by the engine lubrication system. The bearing end clearance is set properly by matching select components in the bearing kit. Always replace the entire kit if any of the parts require replacement. This kit includes two bearings, two bearing races, two retaining rings, and inner spacer. It is a good service practice to tag the bearings for location when removing. The fan is isolated from gear train vibration by a rubber divider in the fan hub. The hub support assembly does not have to be removed from the engine to replace the fan hub. A retainer is installed on the hub. The retainer will prevent the fan from separating from the engine id the rubber member fails. On some models, this retainer is already cast on the inner part of the hub and can not be removed.

WARNING Never attempt to rotate the engine by pulling or prying on the fan. This practice can result in serious personal injury and damage to the fan. Use only the proper engine barring techniques to manually rotate the engine. Engine Fans must be inspected for missing balance weights at each regular maintenance interval. Do not attempt to repair broken or bent fans, or fans with missing balance weights. Most equipment that has a Cummins® engine uses a radiator and fan. The radiator and fan transfer heat from the cooling water to the atmosphere. The fan selection process must conclude that the fan, the fan mounting arrangement, and the fan drive system are designed and matched for compatibility. Upon request Cummins® Customer Engineering Department will assist in determining the proper selection. Reference any fan changes other than the direct replacement of a fan with precisely the same Cummins® part number first to a Cummins® Authorized Repair Location for assistance. Examples that require approval are: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Using an approved fan from one engine model on a different engine model. Using an approved fan on an engine with a different fan mounting arrangement. Using an approved fan on an engine with a different fan drive arrangement. Converting an engine from one market model to another. An example is the conversion of a G-drive engine to a power unit application. 5. Converting an engine model to a different model. An example is converting a KT19 to a KTA19 model.

This list is not inclusive. Always contact Application Engineering for assistance. At times an existing fan can yield ONLY marginal cooling capability when being considered for a new application.

CAUTION Never repitch (bend) the blades to obtain additional air delivery. Bending the blades or

spider creates stress in the material used for the construction of the fan. Repitching (bending) will cause fan failure. The proper diameter fan must be selected. Never modify an existing fan. The following publications, available through a Cummins® Authorized Repair Location, provide cooling system installation recommendations and specifications approved by Cummins Inc. z

z

z

Operation of Diesel Engines in Cold Climates, Bulletin 3379009. Generator Drive and Generator Set Installation Recommendations (Cooling System), Bulletin 3382395. Coolant Requirements and Maintenance, Bulletin 3666132.

NOTE: Refer to Procedure 205-002 (Service Literature Ordering Location) in section L for literature ordering information.

Last Modified: 01-Mar-2010 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

200-003 Flow Diagram, Cooling System

Flow Diagram

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Coolant inlet Coolant filter Coolant pump Coolant supply to engine block Lubricating oil cooler Coolant supply to turbocharger Coolant return from turbocharger Cabin heater port Coolant flow to cylinder liners Coolant flow to cylinder head Coolant return to thermostat housing Coolant bypass from thermostat.

1. Coolant out of aftercooler 2. Coolant to aftercooler

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Cylinder liner Water pump Coolant bypass from thermostat Water inlet Water filter.

Aftercooled Engines

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. LTA

Coolant flow from cylinder heads Rocker housing Coolant manifold Coolant before thermostat Thermostats Coolant return to radiator Coolant bypass to coolant pump Vent to radiator.

Vent to radiator top tank Coolant to radiator Vent line from aftercooler Coolant out of aftercooler Thermostats Coolant before thermostats Coolant bypass Coolant manifold.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

To aftercooler radiator From aftercooler radiator To radiator From aftercooler To aftercooler From coolant pump.

Single Loop LTA Cooling 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Coolant return from turbocharger Coolant return to thermostat housing Aftercooler Coolant return from aftercooler Coolant supply to aftercooler Coolant flow to cylinder head Coolant flow to cylinder liners Coolant pump Coolant return to coolant pump Emergency pump connection outlet Emergency pump connection inlet Coolant supply to thermostat housing Coolant supply to engine block Lubricating oil cooler Coolant supply to turbocharger.

Single Loop LTA Keel Cooling 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Aftercooler coolant supply Aftercooler coolant return to thermostat housing Coolant supply from keel cooler Coolant bypass flow to aftercooler Aftercooler coolant return to coolant pump Coolant make-up line from expansion tank Thermostat Coolant supply to keel cooler Coolant return to coolant pump Coolant return to thermostat housing Coolant supply to thermostat housing Coolant pump Coolant supply to engine block.

Single Loop LTA Thermostat Housing Coolant Flow A. Thermostat closed (up to 66°C [150°F]) B. Thermostat partially open (66 to 79°C [150 to 175°F]) C. Thermostat open (above 79°C [175°F]). 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Aftercooler coolant supply Coolant bypass flow to aftercooler Coolant return to coolant pump Coolant supply from coolant pump Block coolant return to thermostat housing Aftercooler coolant return to thermostat housing Coolant from keel cooler

8. Coolant to keel cooler.

Last Modified: 03-Oct-2006 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

011-999 Exhaust System - Overview

General Information Exhaust Manifold

CAUTION Failure can result if the high strength manifold is not used on the KTTA engines. The exhaust manifold on an engine with two turbochargers is manufactured from a higher strength material that the exhaust manifold used on an engine with one turbocharger. The high strength manifold can be used on KT and KTA engines.

Last Modified: 20-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

200-005 Flow Diagram, Exhaust System

Flow Diagram

Exhaust System 1. Exhaust valve ports 2. Exhaust manifold 3. Turbocharger exhaust outlet.

KTTA Exhaust System 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Exhaust valve ports Exhaust manifold High stage turbocharger Low stage turbocharger Turbocharger exhaust outlet.

Last Modified: 03-Oct-2006 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

012-999 Compressed Air System - Overview

General Information The compressed air system normally consists of a geardriven air compressor, an air governor, air tanks and all necessary plumbing. The Holset and Cummins single and two cylinder air compressors are engine-driven, piston-type compressors which supply compressed air to operate air activated devices. The compressor runs continuously, but has a loaded and unloaded operating mode.

Holset SS and ST model air compressors built with the E-Type unloader can be identified by the letter “E” (SS296E, SS338E, ST676E, and ST773E), and by the caution on the data plate.

All QE (QE296 and QE338) model air compressors are equipped with the EType unloader.

Vehicles equipped with air dryers vented to the atmosphere during unloaded compressor operation, using the Holset E-Type air compressor, require the installation of an econ valve to prevent excessive oil consumption. NOTE: Some air dryers can have a built-in econ valve. Check with the manufacturer as to which type is installed.

Air systems without air dryers, or with air dryers not vented to the atmosphere during unloaded compressor operation, can use the Holset E-Type unloader valve without modifying

the air system.

Last Modified: 29-Nov-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

200-006 Flow Diagram, Compressed Air System

Compressed Air System

1. 2. 3. 4.

Air governor signal Air Lubrication Coolant

Last Modified: 03-Oct-2006 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

013-999 Electrical Equipment - Overview

General Information The basic heavyduty electrical system consists of: z

z

z

z

z

z

Batteries (1) (usually two or four connected in parallel) Starting motor (2) Alternator (3) Magnetic switch (4) Ignition switch (5) Necessary wiring

All components must be carefully matched.

The accompanying illustrations show typical parallel and series battery connections. z

Parallel connection

z

Series connection

Last Modified: 27-Oct-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

016-999 Mounting Adaptations - Overview

General Information The Mounting Adaptations group consists of the flywheel housing, flywheel, and the front engine support. Flywheel Housings for various applications, are available in different styles, sizes, and materials. Check the appropriate parts book and the engine parts listing for the correct part number for the engine application being serviced. The Flywheel and Ring Gear is available only as an assembly. The assembly includes the flywheel and the ring gear. The ring gear is available for service. Flywheel Housing - redowel to the cylinder block, Procedure 016-006, will describe how to install the oversize locating dowel pins in a flywheel housing and a cylinder block. There are two dowel pins in the cylinder block. The pins protrude into holes in the flywheel housing. The pins are used to align the housing properly to the cylinder block when it is installed. The flywheel housing must be in proper alignment. If the housing is not in proper alignment, the holes in the flywheel housing and the block must be reamed for a bigger dowel. The dowel holes on K19 engine blocks and flywheel housings are precision doweled. The holes are machined to 12.7 mm [0.500 in] separately. The parts are assembled and the alignment is checked. If the alignment is not within specifications, oversize dowels are installed at the factory. Replacing the block or the flywheel housing does not necessarily mean that the flywheel housing and the cylinder block have to be redoweled.

Last Modified: 07-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Air Compressor Air Pressure Rises Slowly Symptom Tree t004 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Air system leaks

Block the vehicle wheels and check the air system for leaks with spring brakes applied and released. Check for leaks from the air compressor gaskets and the air system hoses, fittings, tanks, and valves. Refer to Procedure 012-019 and the OEM service manual.

Air governor is malfunctioning or not set correctly

Check the air governor for correct operation. Refer to Procedure 012-017.

Carbon buildup is excessive in the air discharge line, check valve, or cylinder head

Check for carbon buildup. Replace the air compressor discharge line, if necessary. Check the turbocharger for oil leaks. Check the intake tube for oil. Refer to Procedures 012-003 and 010-033.

E-type system is not plumbed correctly

Install an Econ valve, a check valve, and system hoses. Refer to the Master Repair Manual Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121.

Air system component is malfunctioning

Check the operation of check valves, alcohol evaporators, air dryers, and other OEM-installed air system components. Refer to manufacturer's instructions.

Unloader valve is malfunctioning

Check the unloader valve and unloader body seal. Refer to Procedure 012-013.

Air compressor intake or exhaust valve leaks air

Inspect the air compressor intake and exhaust valve assemblies. Refer to Procedures 012-013, 012-104, and 012106.

Last Modified: 09-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Air Compressor Noise is Excessive Symptom Tree t006 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Carbon buildup is excessive in the air discharge line, check valve, or cylinder head

Check for carbon buildup. Replace the air compressor discharge line, if necessary. Check the turbocharger for oil leaks. Check the intake tube for oil. Refer to Procedures 012-003 and 010-033.

Unloader valve is malfunctioning

Check the unloader valve and unloader body seal. Refer to Procedure 012-013.

Air compressor intake or exhaust valve leaks air

Inspect the air compressor intake and exhaust valve assemblies. Refer to Procedure 012-103, 012-104, or 012106.

Splined drive coupling or gear is excessively worn

Check the coupling for wear. Refer to Procedure 012-014.

Pin bore wear is excessive

Check for pin bore wear. Refer to Procedure 012-010.

Air compressor is excessively worn or internally damaged

Replace or rebuild the air compressor. Refer to Procedure 012-014 and the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121. Replace the desiccant element on the Turbo/CR 2000 air dryer (if equipped). Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Air compressor drive gear or engine gear train is worn or damaged

Inspect the accessory drive gears and gear train. Refer to Procedure 009-011.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Air Compressor Pumping Excess Lubricating Oil into the Air System Symptom Tree t007 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Follow this symptom tree to identify and repair the source of excessive lubricating oil in the air system. Then check for carbon buildup in the air discharge line, check valve, and air compressor cylinder head. Clean or replace the air system components if necessary. Refer to Procedures 012-003, 012-103, 012-104, 012-106, or the manufacturer's instructions.

Lubricating oil drain interval is excessive

Verify the correct lubricating oil drain interval. Refer to Procedure 102-002, Maintenance Schedule, in the Operation and Maintenance Manual, K19, KTA19, and KTTA19 Series Engine, Bulletin 3666013.

Engine angularity during operation exceeds specification

Refer to the engine specification data sheet.

Air compressor pumping time is excessive

Replace the desiccant cartridge on the Turbo/CR 2000 air dryer. Refer to the OEM service manual. Check the air compressor duty cycle. Install a larger air compressor, if necessary. Refer to the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121.

E-type system is not plumbed correctly

Install an Econ valve, a check valve, and system hoses. Refer to the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121.

Lubricating oil drain line is restricted

Remove the air compressor and check the oil drain holes in the air compressor and the accessory drive. Refer to Procedures 012-103, 012-104, and 012106.

Turbocharger compressor oil seal is leaking

Check the compressor oil seal. Refer to Procedure 010-033.

Air compressor is excessively worn or internally damaged

Replace or rebuild the air compressor. Refer to Procedure 012-014 and the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121. Replace the desiccant element on the Turbo/CR 2000 air dryer (if equipped). Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Air Compressor Will Not Maintain Adequate Air Pressure (Not Pumping Continuously) Symptom Tree t008 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Air system leaks

Block the vehicle wheels and check the air system for leaks with spring brakes applied and released. Check for leaks from the air compressor gaskets and the air system hoses, fittings, tanks, and valves. Refer to Procedure 012-019 and the OEM service manuals.

Air governor is malfunctioning or not set correctly

Check the air governor for correct operation. Refer to Procedure 012-017.

E-type system is not plumbed correctly

Install an Econ valve, a check valve, and system hoses. Refer to the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121.

Air compressor intake or exhaust valve leaks air

Inspect the air compressor intake and exhaust valve assemblies. Refer to Procedures 012-103, 012-104, and 012106.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Air Compressor Will Not Pump Air Symptom Tree t009 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Air governor is malfunctioning or not set correctly

Check the air governor for correct operation. Refer to Procedure 012-017.

E-type system is not plumbed correctly

Install an Econ valve, a check valve, and system hoses. Refer to the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121.

Unloader valve is malfunctioning

Check the unloader valve and unloader body seal. Refer to Procedure 012-013.

Air compressor intake or exhaust valve leaks air

Inspect the air compressor intake and exhaust valve assemblies. Refer to Procedures 012-103, 012-104, and 012106.

Splined drive coupling or gear is excessively worn

Check the coupling for wear. Refer to Procedure 012-014.

Air compressor is excessively worn or internally damaged

Replace or rebuild the air compressor. Refer to Procedure 012-014 and the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121. Replace the desiccant element on the Turbo/CR 2000 air dryer (if equipped). Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Air Compressor Will Not Stop Pumping Symptom Tree t010 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Air system leaks

Block the vehicle wheels and check the air system for leaks with spring brakes applied and released. Check for leaks from the air compressor gaskets and the air system hoses, fittings, tanks, and valves. Refer to Procedure 012-019 and the OEM service manuals.

Air governor is malfunctioning or not set correctly

Check the air governor for correct operation. Refer to Procedure 012-017.

Air governor signal line or actuator line is plugged

Inspect the signal line and actuator line. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

E-type system is not plumbed correctly

Install an Econ valve, a check valve, and system hoses. Refer to the Master Repair Manual, Holset Air Compressors, Bulletin 3666121.

Unloader valve is malfunctioning

Check the unloader valve and unloader body seal. Refer to Procedure 012-013.

Air compressor intake or exhaust valve leaks air

Inspect the air compressor intake and exhaust valve assemblies. Refer to Procedures 012-103, 012-104, and 012106.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Alternator Not Charging or Insufficient Charging Symptom Tree t013 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Alternator belt is loose

Check the alternator belt tension. Refer to Procedure 013-005.

Alternator pulley is loose on the shaft

Tighten the pulley. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Battery cables or connections are loose, broken, or corroded (excessive resistance)

Check the battery cables and connections. Refer to Procedure 013009.

Batteries have malfunctioned

Check the condition of the batteries. Replace the batteries, if necessary. Refer to Procedure 013-007 and the OEM service manual.

Voltmeter is malfunctioning

Inspect the voltmeter. Replace as needed. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Alternator or voltage regulator is malfunctioning

Test the alternator output. Replace the alternator or voltage regulator if necessary. Refer to Procedure 013-001 and the OEM service manual.

Electrical system is "open" (blown fuses, broken wires, or loose connections)

Check the fuses, wires, and connections. Refer to the OEM service manual and the manufacturer's wiring diagram.

Battery temperature is above specification

Position the batteries away from heat sources. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Alternator is overloaded, or alternator capacity is below specification

Install an alternator with a higher capacity. Refer to Procedure 013-001 and the OEM service manual.

Battery isolator malfunctioned (if equipped)

Refer to boat manufacturer's specification and wiring.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Alternator Overcharging Symptom Tree t014 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Battery cables or connections are loose, broken, or corroded (excessive resistance)

Check the battery cables and connections. Refer to Procedure 013-009.

Battery condition poor

Load-test the battery. If the battery charge is low, charge the battery. If battery fails the second load test, replace the battery. Refer to Procedure 013-007.

Voltage regulator is malfunctioning

Check the voltage regulator. Replace the voltage regulator, if necessary. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Battery isolator malfunctioned (if equipped)

Refer to boat manufacturer's specifications and wiring.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Coolant Loss - External Symptom Tree t020 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Coolant level is above specification

Check the coolant level. Refer to the OEM service manual.

External coolant leak

Inspect the engine for coolant leaking from hoses, draincocks, the water manifold, jumper tubes, the heat exchanger, expansion and pipe plugs, fittings, the turbocharger, cylinder head gaskets, the lubricating oil cooler, the water pump seal, and OEM-mounted components that have coolant flow. If necessary, pressure-test the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008-018.

Pressure cap is not correct or is malfunctioning

Replace pressure cap with the correct rating for the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008-047.

Cooling system is contaminated with dirt, scale, or sludge

Clean the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008-018.

Fill line or vent lines are restricted, obstructed, or not routed correctly

Check the vent lines and the fill line for correct routing and for restriction. Refer to Procedure 008-017.

Coolant is frozen due to incorrect antifreeze concentration

Check the antifreeze concentration. Refer to Procedure 008-022.

Air or combustion gases are entering the cooling system

Check for air or combustion gases in the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008019.

Engine is overheating

Refer to the Coolant Temperature Above Normal - Sea Water Cooling System symptom tree.

Cylinder block counterbore leak

Inspect the cylinder block for coolant leaking from the counterbore area. Conduct a leak test. Refer to Procedure 001-026.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Coolant Loss - Internal Symptom Tree t021 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Air compressor cylinder head is cracked or porous, or has a leaking gasket

Inspect the air compressor cylinder head and gasket. Refer to Procedures 012103, 012-104, and 012-106.

Lubricating oil cooler is leaking

Check the lubricating oil cooler for coolant leaks. Refer to Procedure 007007.

Fuel heater is leaking coolant

Check the fuel heater for coolant leaks. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Transmission oil cooler or torque converter cooler is leaking

Check the transmission oil cooler and torque converter cooler for coolant leaks. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Combustion gases are entering the cooling system

Check for combustion gases in the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008019.

Heat exchanger core leaks internally

Pressure-test the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008-018.

Cylinder liner is corroded or cracked, or the cylinder block is cracked or porous

Remove the oil pan. Pressure-test the cooling system to check for leaks. Refer to Procedure 008-018.

Cylinder block is cracked or porous

Inspect the cylinder block. Refer to Procedure 001-026.

Cylinder head is cracked or porous

Pressure-test the cylinder head. Refer to Procedure 002-004.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Coolant Temperature Above Normal - Gradual Overheat Symptom Tree t022 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Coolant temperature gauge is malfunctioning

Test the temperature gauge. Repair or replace the gauge, if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-004 and the OEM service manual.

Cold weather radiator cover or winterfront is closed

Open the cold weather radiator cover or the winterfront. Maintain a minimum of 784 cm2 [122 in2] or approximately 28 x 28 cm [11 x 11 in] of opening at all times. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Coolant level is below specification

Inspect the engine and cooling system for external coolant leaks. Repair if necessary. Add coolant. Refer to Procedure 008-018.

Radiator fins or air conditioner condenser fins are damaged or obstructed with debris

Inspect the radiator fins and air conditioner condenser fins. Clean if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-042.

Cooling system hose is collapsed, restricted, or leaking

Inspect the hoses. Refer to Procedure 008-045.

Fan drive belt is loose

Check the belt tension and tighten if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-002.

Lubricating oil level is above or below specification

Check the oil level. Add or drain oil, if necessary. Refer to Procedure 007-025.

Fan shroud is damaged or missing or the air recirculation baffles are damaged or missing

Inspect the shroud and the recirculation baffles. Repair, replace, or install, if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-038.

Pressure cap is not correct or is malfunctioning

Replace pressure cap with the correct rating for the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008-047.

Supplemental coolant additive (SCA) level is above specification or the coolant is overconcentrated with antifreeze

Check the SCA level. Verify the antifreeze concentration. Refer to Procedure 008-022.

Fill line or vent lines are restricted, obstructed, or not routed correctly

Check the vent lines and the fill line for correct routing and for restriction. Refer to Procedure 008-017.

Intake manifold air temperature is above specification

Refer to the Intake Manifold Air Temperature Above Specification symptom tree.

Fan drive or fan controls are malfunctioning

Check the fan drive and controls. Refer to Procedure 008-040.

Thermostat is not correct or is malfunctioning

Check the thermostat for the correct part number and for correct operation. Refer to Procedure 008-013.

Air or combustion gases are entering the cooling system

Check for air or combustion gases in the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008019.

Cooling system component is malfunctioning

Perform the cooling system diagnostics test. Refer to Procedure 008-020.

Water pump is malfunctioning

Check the water pump. Replace the water pump if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-062.

Radiator core is internally obstructed or damaged, or the check valve or J-tube is malfunctioning

Inspect the radiator and clean if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-042.

Check valve is damaged (with remotemounted engine coolant heater)

Inspect the check valve. Replace if necessary. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Engine is overfueled

Check the engine fuel rate. Refer to the OEM specifications.

Torque converter is malfunctioning

Check the torque converter. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Vehicle cooling system is not adequate

Verify that the engine and vehicle cooling systems are using the correct components. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Keel cooler or heat exchanger is malfunctioning or not adequately sized

Refer to the engine performance data sheet for heat rejection specification.

Sea water cooling system is malfunctioning

Troubleshoot the sea water system. Refer to the Coolant Temperature Above Normal - Sea Water Cooling System symptom tree.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Coolant Temperature Above Normal - Sudden Overheat Symptom Tree t023 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Fan drive belt is broken

Check the fan drive belt. Replace the belt, if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-002.

External coolant leak

Inspect the engine for coolant leaking from hoses, draincocks, water manifold, jumper tubes, expansion and pipe plugs, fittings, radiator core, air compressor and cylinder head gaskets, lubricating oil cooler, water pump seal, cylinder block, and OEM-mounted components that have coolant flow. If necessary, pressure-test the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008-018.

Fan drive or fan controls are malfunctioning

Check the fan drive and controls. Refer to Procedure 008-040.

Radiator fins or air conditioner condenser fins are damaged or obstructed with debris

Inspect the radiator fins and air conditioner condenser fins. Clean if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-042.

Cooling system hose is collapsed, restricted, or leaking

Inspect the hoses. Refer to Procedure 008-045.

Pressure cap is not correct or is malfunctioning

Replace pressure cap with the correct rating for the cooling system. Refer to Procedure 008-047.

Fill line or vent lines are restricted, obstructed, or not routed correctly

Check the vent lines and the fill line for correct routing and for restriction. Refer to Procedure 008-017 and the OEM specifications.

Cooling system component is malfunctioning

Perform the cooling system diagnostics test. Refer to Procedure 008-020.

Thermostat is not correct or is malfunctioning

Check the thermostat for the correct part number and for correct operation. Refer to Procedure 008-013.

Water pump is malfunctioning

Check the water pump. Replace the water pump if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-062.

Sea water cooling system is malfunctioning

Troubleshoot the sea water system. Refer to the Coolant Temperature Above Normal - Sea Water Cooling System symptom tree.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Coolant Temperature Below Normal Symptom Tree t024 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Engine is operating at low ambient temperature

Check the winterfront, shutters, and under-the-hood air. Use under-the-hood intake air in cold weather. Refer to the Operation of Diesel Engines in Cold Climates, Bulletin 3379009.

Coolant temperature gauge is malfunctioning

Test the temperature gauge. Repair or replace the gauge, if necessary. Refer to Procedure 008-004 and the OEM service manual.

Coolant temperature sensor is malfunctioning

Use an electronic service tool to check the coolant temperature sensor circuit. Refer to Procedure 019-019 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Cooling system component is malfunctioning

Perform the cooling system diagnostics test. Refer to Procedure 008-020.

Thermostat seal is damaged, missing, or not installed correctly

Check the thermostat seal. Check the thermostat for correct seating. Refer to Procedure 008-016.

Thermostat is not correct or is malfunctioning

Check the thermostat for the correct part number and for correct operation. Refer to Procedure 008-013.

Coolant flow through the radiator is not correct

Check for correct coolant flow through the radiator. Refer to Procedure 008-042.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

View Related Topic

Crankcase Gases (Blowby) Excessive Symptom Tree t027 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Excessive engine blowby

Before troubleshooting, it is important to determine the exact complaint by interviewing the operator, looking at the service history, oil consumption records, oil sampling information, and looking at the ECM information and fault codes.

Engine oil pan is overfilled

Inspect the oil level. Refer to Procedure 018-017 (Lubricating Oil System) in Section V.

Crankcase breather tube is plugged downstream of the blowby sensor

Inspect the breather tube for signs of debris or any other blockage or restriction. Refer to Procedure 003-001 (Crankcase Breather, External) in Section 3.

Air intake system restriction

Check the air intake system for restriction. Refer to Procedure 010-031 (Air Intake Restriction) in Section 10.

Engine blowby sensor has failed in range, or the electronic control module (ECM) calibration is incorrect

Connect the electronic control module (ECM) with INSITE™ electronic service tool and look for active, or recently active, Fault Codes 555, 719, or 729. If any are found active, perform the troubleshooting for the appropriate fault code. Inspect the blowby sensor and verify the blowby measurement. Refer to Procedure 019043 (Engine Wiring Harness), Procedure 019-201 (Weather-Pack™ Connector Series), and Procedure 019-202 (MetriPack™ Connector Series) in Section 19 of the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual, CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Blowby sensor wiring harness connector is damaged

Connect to the electronic control module (ECM) with INSITE™ electronic service tool and look for active, or recently active, Fault Codes 555, 719, or 729. If any are found active, perform the troubleshooting for the appropriate fault code. Inspect the blowby sensor wiring harness connector for signs of corrosion or other damage. Refer to Procedure 019-043 (Engine Wiring Harness), Procedure 019-201 (Weather-Pack™ Connector Series), and Procedure 019-202 (Metri-Pack™ Connector Series) in Section 19 of the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual, CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Air compressor is malfunctioning

Isolate the air compressor by disconnecting the air inlet and outlet lines. Refer to Procedure 008-019 (Cooling System - Air or Combustion Gas Test) in Section 8. Check blowby. If blowby is within specifications, rebuild or replace the air compressor.

One or more turbochargers are damaged

Isolate the turbocharger(s) one at a time by disconnecting the oil return lines. Check blowby and compare to data taken before disconnecting the oil return lines. Alternatively, check the turbocharger compressor and turbine seals. Refer to Procedure 010-033 (Turbocharger) in Section 10.

One or more power cylinders are damaged

If equipped with a MCRS fuel system, use INSITE™ electronic service tool to shut off injectors/cylinders. First bank by bank, then cylinder by cylinder. Check blowby and compare to data taken before shutting off the back or cylinder. Alternatively, for all engines, perform a cylinder compression check. If a cylinder is found suspect, inspect the piston, piston rings, liner, and cylinder head for damage. Refer to Procedure 001-028 (Cylinder Liner), Procedure 001-043 (Piston), and Procedure 001-047 (Piston Rings) in Section 1, and Procedure 002004 (Cylinder Head) in Section 2.

Cylinder head valve guides are excessively worn

Inspect the valve guides for wear and proper lubrication. Confirm the part number on the guide seal is correct. Refer to Procedure 002-004 (Cylinder Head) in Section 2.

Engine has incorrect size valve guides installed

Measure the valve guides and compare against the rebuild specifications for the cylinder head. Refer to Procedure 002004 (Cylinder Head) in Section 2.

Last Modified: 05-Dec-2007 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Acceleration or Response Poor Symptom Tree t033 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Verify the complaint

Test the engine operation while under load. Perform an engine acceleration test. Perform an engine load test. Observe the percent load with an electronic service tool. Refer to the Driveability/Low Power form.

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Accelerator pedal or lever position sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check for accelerator pedal or lever restriction. Check the percent throttle reading on the electronic service tool or Cummins Digital Display. Check the position sensor and the circuit. Verify the accelerator position sensor provides 0- to 100-percent input to the ECM. Adjust as required. Refer to Procedures 019-085 and 019-086 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Programmable parameters or selected features are not correct or are not set the same as the values in comparable vehicles

Check the programmable parameters and the selected features with an electronic service tool. Make sure that gear-down protection road speeds are set to the same values as in comparable vehicles. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-032 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070, and the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Vehicle parasitics are excessive

Check the vehicle brakes for dragging, transmission malfunction, cooling fan operation cycle time, and engine-driven units. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Vessel is malfunctioning or parasitics are excessive

Check the vessel bottom, propeller, transmission, and driven accessories. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Drivetrain or propeller is damaged or is not correctly matched to the engine

Check for the correct gearing, drivetrain components, or propeller. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Intake manifold air temperature is below specification

Refer to the Coolant Temperature Below Normal symptom tree.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Gear pump is malfunctioning

Check the gear pump output pressure. Replace the gear pump if necessary. Refer to Procedure 005-016.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Fuel drain line restriction

Check the fuel drain lines for restriction. Clear or replace the fuel lines, check valves, or tank vents as necessary. Refer to Procedure 006-012.

Engine is operating above recommended altitude

Engine power decreases above recommended altitude. Refer to the Engine Data Sheet for specifications.

Air intake or exhaust leaks

Inspect the air intake and exhaust systems for air leaks. Refer to Procedure 010-024.

AFC signal line is restricted or leaking

Check the AFC signal line for restriction and leaks. Refer to Procedure 005-001.

Air intake system restriction is above specification

Check the air intake system for restriction. Clean or replace the air filter and inlet piping as necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-031.

Exhaust system restriction is not within specification

Check the exhaust system for restrictions. Refer to Procedure 011-009.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Turbocharger is not correct

Check the turbocharger part number and compare it to the Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 3379133 or 4021327. Replace the turbocharger if necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-033.

Fuel inlet temperature to pump is above specification

Fill the fuel tank, turn off or bypass the fuel heaters, and check the fuel cooler. Refer to the OEM service manual.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Rail pressure sensor is malfunctioning

Check the rail pressure sensor. Refer to Procedure 019-115 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

OEM rail pressure lines are excessively long or trapped with air, which causes an accumulator effect (vehicles equipped with cab rail pressure gauges only)

Vent the air from the OEM devices. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Debris in the fuel passages

Check the fuel tubes and fuel manifold for debris. Refer to Procedure 006-024 or 006-022.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Static injection timing is not correct

Check the static injection timing. Refer to Procedure 006-025.

Crankcase pressure is excessive

Check for excessive blowby. Refer to the Crankcase Gases (blowby) Excessive symptom tree.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Decelerates Slowly Symptom Tree t041 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Accelerator pedal position sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check for accelerator pedal or lever restriction. Check the percent throttle reading on an electronic service tool. Check the accelerator pedal position sensor and the circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-085 and 019-086 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Programmable parameters or selected features are not correct

Check the programmable parameters and the selected features with an electronic service tool. Set the parameters and features again if necessary. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored

in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls

Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-032 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070, and the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

OEM rail pressure lines are excessively long or trapped with air, which causes an accumulator effect (vehicles equipped with cab rail pressure gauges only)

Vent the air from the OEM devices. Refer to the OEM service manuals.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Injector is malfunctioning

Replace the malfunctioning injector. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Difficult to Start or Will Not Start (Exhaust Smoke) Symptom Tree t043 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Fuel level is low in the tank

Fill the supply tank. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Vehicle parasitics are excessive

Check the vehicle brakes for dragging, transmission malfunction, cooling fan operation cycle time, and engine-driven units. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Vessel is malfunctioning or parasitics are excessive

Check the vessel bottom, propeller, transmission, and driven accessories. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications.

Starting aid is necessary for cold weather or starting aid is malfunctioning

Check for the correct operation of the starting aid. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions. Refer to the Operation of Diesel Engines in Cold Climates, Bulletin 3379009.

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-031 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070, and the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Engine cranking speed is too slow

Check the engine cranking speed with a handheld tachometer or electronic service tool. If the cranking speed is slower than 150 rpm, refer to the Engine Will Not Crank or Cranks Slowly (electric start) symptom tree.

Engine idle speed is set too low (electronically controlled fuel systems)

Verify the correct idle speed setting. Increase the idle speed with the idle increment switch or an electronic service tool. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Engine speed sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check the engine speed sensor for correct adjustment and for debris on the sensor. Check the engine speed sensor circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-042 and 019-106 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Gear pump is malfunctioning

Check the gear pump output pressure. Replace the gear pump if necessary. Refer to Procedure 005-016.

Low or no rail pressure to the injectors

Check the rail pressure with an electronic service tool. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual. If the pressure is low, check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Rail pressure sensor is malfunctioning

Check the rail pressure sensor. Refer to Procedure 019-115 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel shutoff valve solenoid or circuit is malfunctioning (electronic controlled fuel systems)

Check the fuel shutoff valve solenoid and circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-049 and 019-050 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Air intake system restriction is above specification

Check the air intake system for restriction. Clean or replace the air filter and inlet piping as necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-031.

Exhaust system restriction is not within specification

Check the exhaust system for restrictions. Refer to Procedure 011-009.

Incorrect datalink adapter being used

Engines using multiple engine synchronization must communicate on J1587. The INLINE, INLINE I, or INLINE II adapter must be used to complete this task.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Injector o-rings are damaged or missing

Remove and check the injectors. Replace the injector o-rings. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Debris in the fuel passages

Check the fuel tubes and fuel manifold for debris. Refer to Procedure 006-022 or 006-024.

Base engine problem

Check the engine for high crankcase pressure, low compression, static injection timing, damaged pistons, camshaft, and other parts. Procedure

006-022 or 006-024

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Difficult to Start or Will Not Start (No Exhaust Smoke) Symptom Tree t044 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Fuel level is low in the tank

Fill the supply tank. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Fuse(s) malfunctioning

Replace the fuse(s) in the OEM interface harness. Refer to Procedure 019-198 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel shutoff valve solenoid or circuit is malfunctioning (electronic controlled fuel systems)

Check the fuel shutoff valve solenoid and circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-049 and 019-050 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-031 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070, and the electronic service tool manual.

Battery voltage supply to the electronic control module (ECM) is low, interrupted, or open

Check the battery connections, the fuses, and the unswitched battery supply circuit. Refer to Procedures 013-009 in this manual, 019-198 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Gear pump is malfunctioning

Check the gear pump output pressure. Replace the gear pump if necessary. Refer to Procedure 005-016.

Low or no rail pressure to the injectors

Check the rail pressure with an electronic service tool. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual. If the pressure is low, check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

In-line check valve(s) is installed backward or has an incorrect part number

Check the in-line check valve(s) for the correct part number. Check the arrow on the check valve(s) for the correct orientation. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Engine speed sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check the engine speed sensor for correct adjustment and for debris on the sensor. Check the engine speed sensor circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-042 and 019-106 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Air intake system restriction is above specification

Check the air intake system for restriction. Clean or replace the air filter and inlet piping as necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-031.

Exhaust system restriction is not within specification

Check the exhaust system for restrictions. Refer to Procedure 011-009.

Internal engine damage

Analyze the oil and inspect the filters to locate an area of probable damage. Refer to Procedure 007-083.

Last Modified: 16-Aug-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Noise Excessive Symptom Tree t047 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

When troubleshooting engine noise complaints, make sure the engine accessories (air compressor, fan clutch, freon compressor, or hydraulic pump) are not the cause of the noise. Refer to Engine Noise Diagnostic Procedures - General Information at the end of Section TS before using this symptom tree.

Lubricating oil level is below specification

Check the oil level. Verify the dipstick calibration and the oil pan capacity. Fill the system to the specified level. Refer to Procedure 007-009.

Lubricating oil pressure is below specification

Check the oil pressure. If the pressure is low, refer to Procedure 007-028.

Coolant temperature is above specification

Check the coolant level. Refer to Procedure 008-018.

Lubricating oil is thin or diluted

Refer to Cummins Engine Oil Recommendations, Bulletin 3810340. If the oil pressure is low, refer to the Lubricating Oil Pressure Low symptom

tree.

Fan drive belt is loose, tight, or not in alignment

Check the fan drive belt. Refer to Procedure 008-002.

Fan is loose, damaged, or not balanced

Check the fan. Refer to Procedure 008040.

Engine mounts are worn, damaged, or not correct

Check the engine mounts. Refer to Procedure 016-010 and the OEM service manual.

Air intake or exhaust piping is contacting the chassis or cab

Inspect the air piping, chassis, and cab for contact points. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Air intake or exhaust leaks

Inspect the air intake and exhaust systems for air leaks. Refer to Procedure 010-024.

Turbocharger noise

Refer to Engine Noise Excessive Turbocharger symptom tree.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Injector is malfunctioning

Replace the malfunctioning injector. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Overhead components are damaged

Inspect the rocker levers, rocker shafts, cam followers or tappets, push rods, and valves for damage or excessive wear. Refer to Procedure 003-009, 004-001, 004-014, or 002-004.

Accessory drive is worn (axial end play is out of specification)

Check the accessory drive axial end play. Inspect the shaft for wear. Refer to Procedure 009-011.

Static injection timing is not correct

Check the static injection timing. Refer to Procedure 006-025.

Vibration damper is damaged

Inspect the vibration damper. Refer to Procedure 001-052.

Air compressor noise is excessive

Refer to the Air Compressor Noise Excessive - Air Compressor symptom tree.

Fan clutch, hydraulic pump, or refrigerant compressor noise is excessive

Isolate each component and check for noise. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Drivetrain noise is excessive

Disconnect the drivetrain. Check for engine noise. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Gear train backlash is excessive or the gear teeth are damaged

Check the gear backlash and the gear teeth. Refer to Procedure 001-036, 001039 and 001-040.

Main bearing or connecting rod bearing noise

Refer to the Engine Noise Excessive Main Bearing symptom tree.

Flywheel or flexplate capscrews are loose or broken

Check the flywheel or flexplate and the mounting capscrews. Refer to Procedure 016-005.

Piston, piston rings, or cylinder liner is worn or damaged

Refer to the Engine Noise Excessive Piston symptom tree.

Internal engine damage

Analyze the oil and inspect the filters to locate an area of probable damage. Refer to Procedure 007-083.

Rear engine power take-off (REPTO) noise is excessive

Disassemble and repair the REPTO as necessary. Refer to the Rear Gear Drive Shop Manual, Bulletin 3666060.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004

Engine Noise Excessive — Combustion Knocks Symptom Tree t048 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Refer to Engine Noise Diagnostic Procedures - General Information at the end of Section TS before using this symptom tree.

Intake manifold air temperature is below specification

Refer to Coolant Temperature Below Normal symptom tree.

Ether starting aid is malfunctioning

Repair or replace the ether starting aids. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Injector is malfunctioning

Replace the malfunctioning injector. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Static injection timing is not correct

Check the static injection timing. Refer to Procedure 006-025.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Noise Excessive — Connecting Rod Symptom Tree t049 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Refer to Engine Noise Diagnostic Procedures - General Information at the end of Section TS before using this symptom tree.

Lubricating oil level is below specification

Check the oil level. Verify the dipstick calibration and the oil pan capacity. Fill the system to the specified level. Refer to Procedure 007-009.

Lubricating oil pressure is below specification

Check the oil pressure. If the pressure is low, refer to Procedure 007-028.

Lubricating oil is thin or diluted

Refer to Cummins Engine Oil Recommendations, Bulletin 3810340. If the oil pressure is low, refer to the Lubricating Oil Pressure Low symptom tree.

Connecting rod capscrews are loose or not tightened correctly

Check the torque on the connecting rod capscrews. Refer to Procedure 001-054.

Connecting rod is bent or out of alignment

Remove and inspect the connecting rods. Refer to Procedure 001-014.

Connecting rod and bearings are damaged or worn, are not assembled correctly, or are the wrong bearings

Inspect the connecting rod and bearings. Refer to Procedure 001-005.

Crankshaft journals are damaged or out of round

Inspect the crankshaft journals. Refer to Procedure 001-006.

Last Modified: 10-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Noise Excessive — Main Bearing Symptom Tree t050 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Refer to Engine Noise Diagnostic Procedures - General Information at the end of Section TS before using this symptom tree.

Main bearing capscrews are loose, worn or not tightened correctly

Check the torque on the main bearing capscrews. Inspect the capscrews for wear. Refer to Procedure 001-006.

Main bearings are damaged or worn, or the wrong bearings are installed

Inspect the main bearings for damage, excessive wear, and the correct part number. Refer to Procedure 001-006.

Crankshaft journals are damaged or out of round

Inspect the crankshaft journals. Refer to Refer to Procedure 001-016.

Last Modified: 20-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Noise Excessive — Piston Symptom Tree t051 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Refer to Engine Noise Diagnostic Procedures - General Information at the end of Section TS before using this symptom tree. Listen to the engine before using this symptom tree. Listen for a light tapping noise, which is more noticeable with no load on the engine. Piston noise can usually be noticed when the engine is decelerating.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Injector is malfunctioning

Replace the malfunctioning injector. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Remove the cylinder head and check for carbon deposits on the pistons. If

Carbon deposits on the top of the pistons are contacting the cylinder head

deposits are excessive, remove and clean the pistons. Check the piston rings for damage or wear. Refer to Procedure 002-004, 001-054, 001-043 and 001-047.

Piston pin or bushing is loose, worn, or not installed correctly

Remove the pistons and inspect the piston pin and bushing for damage, wear, and correct installation. Refer to Procedure 001-043.

Cylinder liner, pistons, or piston rings are worn or damaged

Check the pistons, piston rings, and cylinder liner. Refer to Procedure 001043, 001-047 and 001-028.

Connecting rod is bent or out of alignment

Remove and inspect the connecting rods. Refer to Procedure 001-014 and the engine shop manual.

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Noise Excessive — Turbocharger Symptom Tree t052 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Refer to Engine Noise Diagnostic Procedures - General Information at the end of Section TS before using this symptom tree.

Turbocharger is not correct

Check the turbocharger part number and compare it to the Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 3379133 or 4021327. Replace the turbocharger if necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-033.

Air intake or exhaust piping is contacting the chassis or cab

Inspect the air piping, chassis, and cab for contact points. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Air intake or exhaust leaks

Inspect the air intake and exhaust systems for air leaks. Refer to Procedure 010-024.

Air intake system restriction is above specification

Check the air intake system for restriction. Clean or replace the air filter and inlet piping as necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-031.

Exhaust system restriction is not within specification

Check the exhaust system for restrictions. Refer to Procedure 011-009.

Turbocharger compressor wheel, turbine wheel, or nose cone is damaged

Check the compressor and turbine wheels for damage. Check the nose cone for damage. Refer to Procedure 010-033.

Turbocharger is worn or damaged

Check the turbocharger for damage. Measure the turbine and compressor wheel clearances. Refer to Procedure 010-033 .

Last Modified: 07-Jul-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Power Output Low Symptom Tree t057 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Interview the operator to verify the complaint

Refer to the Driveability - General Information, Driveability/Low Power Customer Complaint Form, and Driveability Checklist. Follow the instructions on the forms before continuing with this tree.

Perform a stall speed test (if applicable)

Perform a stall speed test. Refer to Procedure 014-008.

Vehicle parasitics are excessive

Check the vehicle brakes for dragging, transmission malfunction, cooling fan operation cycle time, and engine-driven units. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Drivetrain is not correctly matched to the engine

Check for correct gearing and drivetrain components. Refer to the OEM vehicle specifications.

Vessel is malfunctioning or parasitics are excessive

Check the vessel bottom, propeller, transmission, and driven accessories. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications.

Drivetrain or propeller is damaged or is not correctly matched to the engine

Check for the correct gearing, drivetrain components, or propeller. Refer to the manufacturer's specifications.

Lubricating oil level is above specification

Check the oil level. Verify the dipstick calibration and oil pan capacity. Fill the system to the specified level. Refer to Procedures 007-009 and 007-025.

Fuel level is low in the tank

Fill the supply tank. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-032 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070, and the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Programmable parameters or selected features are not correct

Check the programmable parameters and the selected features with an electronic service tool. Set the parameters and features again if necessary. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Accelerator pedal or lever position sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check for accelerator pedal or lever restriction. Check the percent throttle reading on the electronic service tool or Cummins Digital Display. Check the position sensor and the circuit. Verify the accelerator position sensor provides 0- to 100-percent input to the ECM. Adjust as required. Refer to Procedures 019-085 and 019-086 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Air intake system restriction is above

Check the air intake system for restriction. Clean or replace the air filter

specification

and inlet piping as necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-031.

Tachometer is not calibrated or is malfunctioning

Compare the tachometer reading with a handheld tachometer or an electronic service tool reading. Calibrate or replace the tachometer as necessary. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Engine speed sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check the engine speed sensor for correct adjustment and for debris on the sensor. Check the engine speed sensor circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-042 and 019-106 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel leak

Check the fuel lines, fuel connections, and fuel filters for leaks. Check the fuel lines to the supply tanks. Refer to Procedure 006-024 and the OEM service manual.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Check the fuel drain lines for restriction. Clear or replace the fuel lines, check

Fuel drain line restriction

valves, or tank vents as necessary. Refer to Procedure 006-012.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Intake manifold air temperature is above specification

Refer to the Intake Manifold Air Temperature Above Specification symptom tree.

Exhaust system restriction is not within specification

Check the exhaust system for restrictions. Refer to Procedure 011-009.

Air intake or exhaust leaks

Inspect the air intake and exhaust systems for air leaks. Refer to Procedure 010-024.

Turbocharger is malfunctioning

Monitor the turbocharger boost pressure with an electronic service tool. Refer to Procedure 010-037.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Fuel inlet temperature to pump is above specification

Fill the fuel tank, turn off or bypass the fuel heaters, and check the fuel cooler. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Low or no rail pressure to the injectors

Check the rail pressure with an electronic service tool. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual. If the pressure is low, check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Debris in the fuel passages

Check the fuel tubes and fuel manifold for debris. Refer to Procedure 006-022 or 006-024.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

AFC signal line is restricted or leaking

Check the AFC signal line for restriction and leaks. Refer to Procedure 006-002.

Engine is operating above recommended altitude

Engine power decreases above recommended altitude. Refer to the Engine Data Sheet for specifications.

Injector is malfunctioning

Replace the malfunctioning injector. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Base engine problem

Check the engine for high crankcase pressure, low compression, static injection timing, damaged pistons, camshaft, and other parts. Procedure 003-006

Last Modified: 20-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Runs Rough at Idle Symptom Tree t061 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Engine is cold

Allow the engine to warm to operating temperature. If the engine will not reach operating temperature, refer to the Coolant Temperature Below Normal symptom tree.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Fuel drain line restriction

Check the fuel drain lines for restriction. Clear or replace the fuel lines, check valves, or tank vents as necessary. Refer to Procedure 006-012.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

Engine idle speed is set too low (electronically controlled fuel systems)

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-031 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070, and the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Verify the correct idle speed setting. Increase the idle speed with the idle increment switch or an electronic service tool. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Engine mounts are worn, damaged, or not correct

Check the engine mounts. Refer to Procedure 016-010.

Engine speed sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check the engine speed sensor for correct adjustment and for debris on the sensor. Check the engine speed sensor circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-042 and 019-106 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

STC oil delivery system is restricted or has a flow loss

Check the STC oil delivery system. Refer to Procedure 019-181 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Gear pump is malfunctioning

Check the gear pump output pressure. Replace the gear pump if necessary. Refer to Procedure 005-016.

Injector is malfunctioning Replace the malfunctioning injector.

Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Debris in the fuel passages

Check the fuel tubes and fuel manifold for debris. Refer to Procedure 006-024 or 006-022.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Base engine problem

Check the engine for high crankcase pressure, low compression, static injection timing, damaged pistons, camshaft, and other parts. Procedure 003-006

Last Modified: 20-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Runs Rough or Misfires Symptom Tree t062 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Fuel drain line restriction

Check the fuel drain lines for restriction. Clear or replace the fuel lines, check valves, or tank vents as necessary. Refer to Procedure 006-012.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ Systems, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-032 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ Systems, Bulletin 3666070, and the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

STC oil delivery system is restricted or has a flow loss

Check the STC oil delivery system. Refer to Procedure 019-181 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ Systems, Bulletin 3666070.

Engine speed sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check the engine speed sensor for correct adjustment and for debris on the sensor. Check the engine speed sensor circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-042 and 019-106 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ Systems, Bulletin 3666070.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ Systems, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel drain line restriction

Check the fuel drain lines for restriction. Clear or replace the fuel lines, check valves, or tank vents as necessary. Refer to Procedure 006-012.

Electronic control module (ECM) is malfunctioning

Replace the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-031 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ Systems, Bulletin 3666070.

Base engine problem

Check the engine for high crankcase pressure, low compression, static injection timing, damaged pistons, camshaft, and other parts. Procedure 019-031 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ Systems, Bulletin 3666070

Last Modified: 20-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Shuts Off Unexpectedly or Dies During Deceleration Symptom Tree t064 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Engine will not restart

Refer to the Engine Difficult to Start or Will Not Start (exhaust smoke) symptom tree.

Keyswitch circuit is malfunctioning

Check the vehicle, equipment, or vessel keyswitch circuit. Refer to Procedure 019-064 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Battery voltage supply to the electronic control module (ECM) is low, interrupted, or open

Check the battery connections, the fuses, and the unswitched battery supply circuit. Refer to Procedure 013-009 and Procedures 019-198 and 019-050 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel shutoff valve(s) closed (electronically controlled injection)

Check the fuel shutoff valve and circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-049 and 019050 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

OEM engine protection system is malfunctioning

Isolate the OEM engine protection system. Follow the OEM service manuals to check for a malfunction.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Injector is malfunctioning

Replace the malfunctioning injector. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Gear pump is malfunctioning

Check the gear pump output pressure. Replace the gear pump if necessary. Refer to Procedure 005-016.

Engine mounts are worn, damaged, or not correct

Check the engine mounts. Refer to Procedure 016-010.

Overhead adjustments are not correct

Measure and adjust the overhead settings. Refer to Procedure 003-006.

Debris in the fuel passages

Check the fuel tubes and fuel manifold for debris. Refer to Procedure 006-022 or 006-024.

Base engine problem

Check the engine for high crankcase pressure, low compression, static injection timing, damaged pistons, camshaft, and other parts. Procedure

006-022 or 006-024

Last Modified: 16-Aug-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Speed Surges at Low or High Idle Symptom Tree t066 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Fuel level is low in the tank

Fill the supply tank. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Verify the ECM calibration is correct. Check the calibration revision history for applicable fixes to the calibration stored in the ECM. Refer to the calibration history spreadsheet Click here to see ecm_calibration_rev_history.xls Electronic control module (ECM) calibration is malfunctioning

on QuickServe® Online or the INCAL™ CD-ROM. Compare the calibration stored in the ECM with the engine rating and Control Parts List (CPL), Bulletin 4021326 or 4021327. If necessary, recalibrate the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-032 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070, and the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Engine idle speed is set too low (electronically controlled fuel systems)

Verify the correct idle speed setting. Increase the idle speed with the idle increment switch or an electronic service tool. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Accelerator pedal or lever position sensor or circuit is malfunctioning

Check for accelerator pedal or lever restriction. Check the percent throttle reading on the electronic service tool or Cummins Digital Display. Check the position sensor and the circuit. Verify the accelerator position sensor provides 0- to 100-percent input to the ECM. Adjust as required. Refer to Procedures 019-085 and 019-086 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Engine speed sensor or circuit is

Check the engine speed sensor for correct adjustment and for debris on the sensor. Check the engine speed sensor

malfunctioning

circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-042 and 019-106 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Fuel drain line restriction

Check the fuel drain lines for restriction. Clear or replace the fuel lines, check valves, or tank vents as necessary. Refer to Procedure 006-012.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

STC oil delivery system is restricted or has a flow loss

Check the STC oil delivery system. Refer to Procedure 019-181 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Vehicle parasitics are excessive

Check the vehicle brakes for dragging, transmission malfunction, cooling fan operation cycle time, and engine-driven units. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Vessel is malfunctioning or parasitics are excessive

Check the vessel bottom, propeller, transmission, and driven accessories. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications.

Injector is malfunctioning

Replace the malfunctioning injector. Refer to Procedure 006-026.

Base engine problem

Check the engine for high crankcase pressure, low compression, static injection timing, damaged pistons, camshaft, and other parts. Procedure 006-026

Last Modified: 20-Dec-2004 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Starts But Will Not Keep Running Symptom Tree t072 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Air in the fuel system

Check for air in the fuel system. Refer to Procedure 006-003.

Fuel level is low in the tank

Fill the supply tank. Refer to the OEM service manual.

Engine-driven units are engaged

Disengage engine-driven units.

Fuel is waxing due to cold weather

Check the fuel heater, if installed. Weather conditions sometimes require a fuel heater.

Fuel inlet restriction

Check for fuel inlet restriction. Refer to Procedure 006-020.

Fuel drain line is bent

Check the fuel drain line. Repair if necessary. Refer to Procedure 006-013.

Fuel shutoff valve solenoid or circuit is malfunctioning (electronic controlled fuel systems)

Check the fuel shutoff valve solenoid and circuit. Refer to Procedures 019-049 and 019-050 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

OEM engine protection system is malfunctioning

Isolate the OEM engine protection system. Follow the OEM service manuals to check for a malfunction.

Keyswitch circuit is malfunctioning

Check the vehicle keyswitch circuit. Refer to Procedure 019-064 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual

CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Auxiliary shutdown circuit malfunctioning

Check auxiliary shutdown circuit. Refer to the OEM service manuals.

Fuel grade is not correct for the application or the fuel quality is poor

Operate the engine from a tank of highquality fuel. Refer to the Fuel for Cummins Engines, Bulletin 3379001.

Air intake system restriction is above specification

Check the air intake system for restriction. Clean or replace the air filter and inlet piping as necessary. Refer to Procedure 010-031.

Exhaust system restriction is not within specification

Check the exhaust system for restrictions. Refer to Procedure 011-009.

Fuel pump is malfunctioning

Check the fuel pump output pressure, pulsation damper, and pressure regulator. Replace the fuel pump if necessary. Refer to Procedures 005-016 and 005-031.

Electronic control module (ECM) is malfunctioning

Replace the ECM. Refer to Procedure 019-031 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Static injection timing is not correct

Check the static injection timing. Refer to Procedure 006-025.

Battery voltage supply to the electronic control module (ECM) has been lost

Check the engine harness, fuses, and ground connection. Refer to the OEM service manuals and Procedure 013-009.

EFC valve is malfunctioning

Check the EFC valve for sticking or leakage. Refer to Procedure 019-102 in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070.

Last Modified: 12-Jan-2005 Copyright © 2000-2010 Cummins Inc. All rights reserved.

Engine Vibration Excessive Symptom Tree t075 This is symptom tree Cause

Correction

Electronic fault codes active or high counts of inactive fault codes

Refer to Section TF in the Troubleshooting and Repair Manual CENTRY™ System, Bulletin 3666070 for fault code troubleshooting.

Engine is misfiring

Refer to the Engine Runs Rough or Misfires symptom tree.

Engine idle speed is set too low (electronically controlled fuel systems)

Verify the correct idle speed setting. Increase the idle speed with the idle increment switch or an electronic service tool. Refer to the appropriate electronic service tool manual.

Fan is loose, damaged, or not balanced

Check the fan. Refer to Procedure 008040.

Belt-driven accessories are malfunctioning

Check the fan hub, alternator, refrigerant compressor, and hydraulic pump for interference. Isolate belt-driven accessories and check for vibration. Refer to the OEM service manual.

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Cummins Qsk19 Series Diesel Engine Service Repair Manual

This Cummins Qsk19 Series Diesel Engine manual contains complete rebuild procedures and specifications. Disassembly, cleaning, inspection, and assembly instructions are included. A listing of accessory and component suppliers is located in Section M – Component Manufacturers. Suppliers can be contacted directly for any information not covered in this manual. Read and follow all safety instructions. Refer to the WARNING in the General Safety Instructions in Section i Introduction.

The repair procedures in this manual are based on the engine or component removed from chassis. Some rebuild procedures require the use of special service tools. Make sure the correct tools are used as described in the procedures.

When a specific brand name, number, or special tool is referenced in this manual, an equivalent product can be used in place of the recommended item. A series of specific service manuals (for example: Troubleshooting and Repair, Specifications, and Alternative Repair) are available and can be ordered by filling out and mailing the Literature Order Form located in Section L – Service Literature. Cummins Engine.

CONTENTS

  • Introduction
  • Engine Identification
  • Complete Engine
  • Cylinder Block
  • Cylinder Head
  • Rocker Levers
  • Cam Followers/Tappets
  • Fuel System
  • Injectors and Fuel Lines
  • Lubricating Oil System
  • Cooling System
  • Drive Units
  • Air Intake System
  • Exhaust System
  • Compressed Air System
  • Electrical Equipment
  • Engine Testing
  • Mounting Adaptations
  • Electronic Engine Controls
  • Service Literature
  • Component Manufacturers
  • Specifications
  • Index

Language: English
Format: PDF
Pages: 634

Cummins Qsk19 Series Diesel Engine Service Repair Manual PDF free online

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Cummins Engines PDF Service Repair Manuals, Parts Catalog and Wiring Diagrams

See also:

Cummins Engine PDf manuals

Cummins Engine logo

Cummins Engines PDF manuals

If you want to download Cummins engines service repair manuals – visit the official site of Cummins. The links from this web site to Cummins web sites are for informational purposes only. Our web site is not affiliated with Cummins, and Cummins is not responsible for the content of this web site or the accuracy of the links.

Cummins Engines

The production activities of Cummins are concentrated in three main areas:

  • Diesel engines for trucks and buses, ships, railway transport, agricultural, road-building and other industrial equipment;
  • Diesel-generator sets;
  • Components for engines: filters, turbochargers, exhaust systems, etc.

Diesel engines and diesel generators are designed and manufactured in 56 manufacturing plants located in the USA, Great Britain, Japan, Turkey, South Korea, China, India, Mexico, Australia, South Africa. The components are manufactured at Cummins subsidiaries with trademarks: Fleetguard, Nelson, Holset, and others.

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CUMMINS ISX12

 

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